Personal Chair
Legal Studies
Telephone: (01792) 602411
Room: Office - 147
First Floor
Richard Price Building
Singleton Campus

My research interests lie in criminal law and counterterrorism, particularly cyberterrorism and terrorists’ use of the internet. I am a Co-Director of the University’s EPSRC-funded £7.6m CHERISH Digital Economy Centre and Director of the University’s multidisciplinary cyberterrorism research project. To date the Cyberterrorism Project has conducted a survey of the global research community, compiled a database of definitions of cyberterrorism, conducted a study of online terrorist magazines, compiled a database of news stories on cyberterrorism, hosted numerous events including a NATO Advanced Research Workshop and an international conference on terrorism and social media, and published four edited collections and six policy reports (see further www.cyberterrorism-project.org). In 2016/17 I was also the holder of a Fulbright Cyber Security Award.

Previously I have completed projects on the construction and application of principles in counterterrorism policy, the notion that counterterrorism policy must balance security and liberty (funded by the British Academy) and Swansea’s approach to youth anti-social behaviour (funded by the Welsh Government). I have also written a number of other articles on the regulation of anti-social behaviour, considering such issues as the use of ASBOs against young people, the definition of anti-social behaviour and the classification of the ASBO as a civil remedy.

Areas of Expertise

  • Criminal law
  • Criminal justice policy
  • Counterterrorism legislation and policy
  • Cyberterrorism and terrorists' use of the internet

Publications

  1. Text, Cases and Materials on Criminal Law (2nd edition). Pearson.
  2. & (2018). Who disseminates Rumiyah? Examining the relative influence of sympathiser and non-sympathiser Twitter users. Europol Headquarters, The Hague: 2nd European Counter Terrorism Centre Advisory Group Conference.
  3. & Purposive and Performative Persuasion: The Linguistic Basis for Criminalising the (Direct and Indirect) Encouragement of Terrorism. In Using Law to Fight Terror: Legal Approaches to Combating Violent Non-State and State-Sponsored Actors. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  4. & Online jihadist magazines and the “religious terrorism” thesis. Critical Studies on Terrorism, 1-14.
  5. & Othering the West in the online Jihadist propaganda magazines Inspire and Dabiq. Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict 6(1), 79-106.

See more...

Teaching

  • LA-362 Criminal Law for Graduate Diploma in Law regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar

    Conversion course for non law graduates to fulfil academic requirements of professional bodies and enable progression to those wishing to become solicitors or barristers.

  • LAA200 Criminal Law 1

    After examining a number of the criminal law¿s basic principles and fundamental concepts, this fifteen credit module examines the law governing homicide offences, non-fatal offences against the person and sexual offences. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAA200C Cyfraith Troseddol 1

    After examining a number of the criminal law¿s basic principles and fundamental concepts, this fifteen credit module examines the law governing homicide offences, non-fatal offences against the person and sexual offences. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAA205 Criminal Law 2

    This fifteen credit module examines the law governing property offences, intoxicated defendants, mental condition defences, substantive defences, inchoate offences and accessories. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAA205C Cyfraith Troseddol 2

    This fifteen credit module examines the law governing property offences, intoxicated defendants, mental condition defences, substantive defences, inchoate offences and accessories. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAA208 Criminal Law 2

    This ten credit module examines the law governing property offences, intoxicated defendants, mental condition defences and substantive defences. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAA208C Cyfraith Troseddol 2

    This ten credit module examines the law governing property offences, intoxicated defendants, mental condition defences and substantive defences. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAA320 Terrorism: The Legal Response

    The UK¿s CONTEST strategy for countering terrorism has four strands. This module focuses on the pursue strand, the aim of which is to disrupt terrorist activity. The module begins by evaluating the UK¿s statutory definition of terrorism, examining debates on the definition¿s scope and clarity. It then looks at the prosecution of terrorist suspects, focussing particularly on ¿precursor¿ criminal offences and the UK¿s self-imposed ban on the use of intercept as evidence in criminal trials. Where prosecution is not possible, the UK will seek to deport foreign suspected terrorists. One of the major obstacles to deportation ¿ the Article 3 ECHR prohibition on torture or ill-treatment ¿ is examined, along with the policy of deportation with assurances. Finally, where neither prosecution nor deportation is possible, suspected terrorists may as a last resort be issued with Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures. The use of these is evaluated, with particular focus on the possibility of closed sessions being held during the application process.

  • LAA340 Work Placement Research Project

    This module offers students the opportunity to complete a dissertation of no more than 10,000 words that builds upon research completed as part of of one of the College's research-based work placements. The student will have the opportunity to write up the work they completed on placement and supplement it with further independent, in-depth study under the supervision of their placement provider and an academic supervisor.

  • LAMM24 Research Methods and Ethics

    This module will provide students with detailed and applied knowledge about empirical research in digital crime and terrorism. It also equips them with the necessary critical and analytic skills to be able to design, implement and disseminate the findings of empirical research projects focusing on a range of challenges linked to digital crime and terrorism. The module is structured into four blocks: (1) Empirical research design; (2) Analytic frameworks; (3) Research ethics/integrity, and researcher well-being; and (4) Co-developing research methodologies with stakeholders. As the above structure shows, Research Methods in Digital Crime and Terrorism covers the principles guiding decision making in empirical research projects ¿ from formulating viable aims and identifying (in)dependent analytic variables through to devising sound data collection methods and triangulating results. It also critically reviews established and new qualitative and quantitative frameworks for the analysis of digital crime and terrorism data, such as surveys, multimodality (image / sound), thematic, network and textual (linguistic) analysis. Within this, an emphasis is placed on the use of mix-methods approaches from a range of disciplines. The module moreover emphasises the importance of research ethics and integrity, paying particular attention to the responsibilities and welfare of researchers. Finally, the module introduces students to the practicalities of working with stakeholders (internet providers, law enforcement, policy makers, legislators, etc.) to co-develop scientifically rigorous and professionally implementable research methodologies that can address stakeholders¿ practical needs.

  • LAQ300 Criminal Law 1

    After examining a number of the criminal law¿s basic principles and fundamental concepts, this fifteen credit module examines the law governing homicide offences, non-fatal offences against the person and sexual offences. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

  • LAQ305 Criminal Law 2

    This fifteen credit module examines the law governing property offences, intoxicated defendants, mental condition defences, substantive defences, inchoate offences and accessories. As well as furthering students¿ ability to analyse and apply the law to factual situations, the module develops students¿ ability to independently assess and evaluate competing arguments by considering certain topics, of particular contemporary relevance, in especial detail.

Supervision

  • Cyber Warfare: Rules and Regulations for States (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
    Other supervisor: Prof Helen Quane
  • Cybercrime and fraud in Wales: patterns of victimisation (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Nuria Lorenzo-Dus
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    LLM
    Other supervisor: Dr Alastair Reed
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
  • Counter-terrorsim and the role of the new security actors: An ethnographic study (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Lella Nouri
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
  • In what ways can the Internet affect radicalisation to violent extremism? (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Lella Nouri
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
  • Surveillance of Social Media and International Human Rights (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Katy Vaughan
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
  • Respecting Human Rights and the Rule of Law in cyberspace: The challenges posed by trans-border access to data in criminal cases (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
    Other supervisor: Prof Helen Quane
  • Regulation of terrorist content on social media: A conceptual framework of different tech companies (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Lella Nouri
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
  • 'The compatability of closed material proceedings with the ECHR standards of fairness' (awarded 2017)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Stuart Macdonald
    Other supervisor: Prof Helen Quane

External Responsibilities

  • Member, editorial board, Studies in Conflict & Terrorism

    2018 - Present

  • Visiting Scholar, University of California, Santa Barbara

    2017 - 2017

  • Visiting Lecturer, Université de Grenoble Faculté de Droit

    2015 - 2015

  • Contributor, Westlaw UK Insight

    2014 - Present

  • Visiting Scholar, University of Sydney Law School

    2011 - 2011

  • Visiting Scholar, Columbia University Law School

    2007 - 2007

  • Fellow, Higher Education Academy

    2005 - Present

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Co-Director, CHERISH - Digital Economy Research Centre

    2016 - Present

  • Co-Lead, Research Environment - School of Law

    2015 - 2018

  • Deputy Director - Centre for Criminal Justice & Criminology, Swansea University

    2011 - 2018

  • Acting Head - Department of Criminology, Swansea University

    2011 - 2012

  • Work Placements Co-ordinator, College of Law - Swansea University

    2008 - 2015

  • Director of Postgraduate Research - College of Law, Swansea University

    2008 - 2011

Key Grants and Projects

  • An examination of the dissemination of online terrorist magazines 2016 - 2016

    The CHERISH-Digital Economy Centre, £3486

  • Fulbright Cyber Security Award 2016 - 2017

    Fulbright Commission, $15,000

  • Advanced Research Workshop on terrorists’ use of the Internet 2016 - 2016

    NATO Emerging Security Challenges Division, with Maura Conway, €45,000

  • Cybercrime in Wales 2015 - 2019

    ESRC 0.5 PhD Studentship, £36,000

  • The CHERISH-DE Centre 2015 - 2020

    EPSRC, with PI: Prof Matt Jones, £3,091,610

  • Symposium on terrorists’ use of the Internet 2014 - 2014

    US Office for Naval Research Global, Collaborative Science Program, £1771

  • Symposium on terrorists’ use of the Internet 2014 - 2014

    Curtin University Countering Violent Extremism research funding, £5875

  • Multidisciplinary Cyberterrorism Conference 2013 - 2013

    NATO Public Diplomacy Programme, with Lee Jarvis, Thomas Chen, £3844

  • Multidisciplinary Cyberterrorism Conference 2013 - 2013

    US Office for Naval Research Global, Collaborative Science Program, with Lee Jarvis, Thomas Chen, £7685

  • Cyberterrorism: A Multidisciplinary Approach 2012 - 2013

    Bridging The Gaps Escalator Funding, with with Lee Jarvis, Thomas Chen, £4880

  • The Articulation and Presentation of the Threat of Cyberterrorism 2012 - 2016

    ESRC 0.5 PhD Studentship, £36,000

  • Swansea’s Tiered Approach to Youth Anti-Social Behaviour 2009 - 2010

    Welsh Government New Ideas Fund, with Simon Hoffman, £9625

  • Balancing Defendants’ Rights and Victims’ Interests 2006 - 2007

    British Academy Small Research Grant, £4217

Awards

Winner, Outstanding Research Collaboration (The Cyberterrorism Project), Swansea University Research and Innovation Awards, 2016

Winner, Outstanding Research Supervision, Swansea University Research and Innovation Awards, 2016

Nominated for LawCareers.Net Law Lecturer of the Year award, 2016

Nominated for Oxford University Press Law Lecturer of the Year Award, 2016

Outstanding Contribution to Student Employability Award, Swansea Employability Academy, 2015

Runner-Up, Outstanding Impact in Law and Public Policy, Swansea University Impact Awards, 2015

Nominated for Swansea University Excellence in Learning and Teaching Award, 2015

Runner-Up, Swansea University Research Community Award, (The Cyberterrorism Project), 2013

Runner-Up, Swansea University Research as Art Competition, (The Cyberterrorism Project), 2013

Pro Vice Chancellor’s Award for Promoting Student Employability, 2013

Nominated for LawCareers.Net Law Lecturer of the Year award, 2012

Nominated for Swansea University Excellence in Learning and Teaching Award, 2012

 

 

Innovation and Engagement activities

  • Member, European Counter Terrorism Centre Advisory Group on Online Terrorist Propaganda
  • Organiser, Terrorism and Social Media Conference, Swansea University, June 2017
  • Director, NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Terrorists’ Use of the Internet (June 2016)
  • Summer Work Placements Coordinator (including research placements with organizations such as the Youth Justice Board for Wales) 2008 - 2015
  • Member, Organization Committee, NATO Advanced Training Course on Terrorists’ Use of Cyberspace (December 2014)
  • Convener, Symposium on Terrorists’ Use of the Internet, Swansea University, June 2014 (attendees included representatives from the Home Office and South Wales Police’s Cybercrime Unit)
  • Speaker, NATO Advanced Training Course on Terrorists’ Use of Cyberspace (Ankara, November 2013)