Mr Sam Hanks
Lecturer in Criminology
Criminology
Telephone: (01792) 513285
Room: Office - 143
First Floor
Richard Price Building
Singleton Campus

Publications

  1. John Hanks, S., Hanks, S. Embodying masculinity in female dominated research settings: A male reflection of ‘doing research’ in massage parlours Sexualities
  2. Robinson , A., Clancy , A., Hanks, S. Prevalence and Characteristics of Serial Domestic Abuse Perpetrators: Multi-Agency Evidence from Wales
  3. Robinson , A., Clancy, A., Hanks, S. Defining and Profiling Serial Domestic Abuse Perpetrators: An All-Wales Feasibility Review
  4. Hanks, S., Hanks, S. Book Review: Julie Ham, Sex Work, Immigration and Social Difference Theoretical Criminology 21 4 561 563

Teaching

  • ASC204 Penology and Punishment

    This module examines contemporary approaches to the punishment of crime, taking account of the history and philosophy of criminal justice responses to offending behaviour, especially within prisons. It considers the purpose and justification for different forms of punishment in modern society, including the death penalty; prisoner experiences including solitary confinement and prisoner rape; as well as critically analysing the treatment of different types of offenders, paying particular attention to disadvantaged/marginalised social groups. The module also examines `newer¿ forms of criminality including peer to peer abuse and online child sex abuse and considers the difficulties that presently exist in successfully identifying and punishing these types of offending behaviours.

  • ASC208 Research Methods in Criminology

    This module will introduce students to the development, application and realities of research methods in Criminology. Students will learn about: ¿ The description, discussion and critical evaluation of quantitative and qualitative research methods employed in applied criminological research ¿ Experimental methods and experimental evaluation, questionnaire, interview, focus group, observation and documentary analysis ¿ The ways that research methodologies are applied in practice, by drawing upon existing examples of research in Criminology

  • ASC212 Criminological Theory: Content and Application

    This module provides students with an understanding of criminology as a theoretical and applied discipline. Therefore, the module analyses criminological theories of crime and deviance, and explores the application of the theories in real life cases. The module analyses competing orthodox, critical and realist theories and perspectives. It is delivered through interactive sessions that give students the opportunity to evaluate the extent to which each of the theories applies in real life cases. Students are guided through the processes of applying each theory to topical and sometimes contentious crimes, acts of deviance, and punishments. By applying the theories to real life cases, students have the opportunity to evaluate the competing theories, their limitations, their contributions as explanations of crime and deviance, and their impact on crime control policies.

  • ASC222 Developing and Planning a Research Project

    Developing and Planning a Research Project is available as an optional 10 credit module to all Criminology and Criminal Justice Single Honours students, and Joint Honours Social Policy and Criminology students. It is important to note that Developing and Planning a Research Project is a pre-requisite to ASC324 Dissertation; therefore if you want to take the Dissertation in your final year then you must select this module. Students need to achieve a 2.1 or above in the assessment of this module in order to be eligible to undertake an empirical research project in their third year dissertation. The module builds on the knowledge and skills gained form the ASC208 Research Methods module and introduces students to the research skills required to develop a rigorous research project. A mixture of lecturer-led and independent learning methods will be used to prepare students for the task of completing their dissertation. All teaching materials will be available through Blackboard. Other relevant material will also be made available through Blackboard.

  • ASC324 Dissertation

    This module will equip students with the skills needed to produce a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words. A series of 6 compulsory meetings with dissertation supervisors followed by optional meetings, enables students to complete this task

  • ASCM27 Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery

    This module discusses what Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery is and examines Human Trafficking and Anti-Slavery legislation and policy at both a global and local level. It considers how the United Kingdom and, in particular Wales, is responding to this global concern. The module considers the application of criminological theories that seek to explain Human Trafficking and looks at practical examples of projects that are working to protect victims.

  • ASCM44 Developing Criminological Research

    The module provides students with an understanding of key methodological approaches which are used in the field of Criminology to help them undertake either literature-based or empirical research themselves in partial completion of their dissertation in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology. A keen focus will be afforded, through this module, both the conceptual and applied natures of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and how these can be utilised to address specific types of research questions. This optional module will be of particular interest to students whose first degree was not in Criminology and/or social science.

  • ASCM45 Developing Criminological Research (DTP Criminology Pathway)

    The module provides DTP students with an understanding of key methodological approaches which are used in the field of Criminology to help them undertake either literature-based or empirical research themselves in partial completion of their dissertation in Social Research (focusing upon a Criminological matter). A keen focus will be afforded, through this module, both the conceptual and applied natures of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and how these can be utilised to address specific types of research questions. This optional module will be of particular interest to students whose first degree was not in Criminology and/or social science.