Dr Rocio Hernandez-Clemente

Publications

  1. & Early Diagnosis of Vegetation Health From High-Resolution Hyperspectral and Thermal Imagery: Lessons Learned From Empirical Relationships and Radiative Transfer Modelling. Current Forestry Reports 5(3), 169-183.
  2. & Diurnal Changes in Leaf Photochemical Reflectance Index in Two Evergreen Forest Canopies. IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing 12(7), 2236-2243.
  3. & (2018). Implications of Diurnal Changes in Leaf PRI on Remote Measurements of Light Use Efficiency. Presented at IGARSS 2018 - 2018 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium,, 9007-9010. Valencia, Spain: IGARSS 2018 - 2018 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. doi:10.1109/IGARSS.2018.8517554
  4. & (2018). Using Sentinel-2 Imagery to Track Changes Produced by Xylella Fastidiosa in Olive Trees. Presented at IGARSS 2018 - 2018 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium,, 9060-9062. Valencia, Spain: IGARSS 2018 - 2018 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. doi:10.1109/IGARSS.2018.8517697
  5. & Chlorophyll content estimation in an open-canopy conifer forest with Sentinel-2A and hyperspectral imagery in the context of forest decline. Remote Sensing of Environment 223, 320-335.

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Teaching

  • GEG236 The Earth from Space: Monitoring Global Environmental Change

    This module introduces the growing role of Earth Observation in Geography, in the context of monitoring global environmental change. Emphasis will be given to practical use of airborne and satellite imagery in a range of geographical applications. In addition to a grounding in the principles of remote sensing, the course will offer in-depth understanding of the use of satellite observations in the study of global change in particular of deforestation and desertification. Practical exercises will teach image processing skills and familiarity with the range of information sources available for remotely sensed imagery.

  • GEG252M Geographical Fieldwork skills: Mallorca

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions within the Mallorca, which serves as an example of a region with a Mediterranean climate, and applying relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. The general aims are to observe, analyse and achieve an understanding of the varied geographical landscape and inherent features of Mallorca and the Mediterranean. Students taking this module will gain experience in research design, methodologies, data analysis and presentation methods, including seminars, posters and reports. Students taking this field course focus on either the physical or human geography on the region and conduct project work appropriate to their specialism. The module comprises preparatory lectures in Swansea during teaching block 2 and a one week field course, which typically runs in the last week of teaching block 2.

  • GEG264B Environmental Research Methods B

    The module builds upon student knowledge covers research project design, data collection and data analysis. Students are introduced to a range of laboratory and field techniques in physical geography along with statistical analyses and presentation skills. They gain experience in describing and interpreting results derived from laboratory techniques concerned with reconstructing the depositional history of sediments, chemical analysis of sediments from a variety of sources and the simulation of geomorphological processes. Students are also introduced to dissertation research. The module culminates in a poster presentation (including short oral introduction to poster) on one of the projects they have undertaken.

  • GEG268 Dissertation Preparation

    The module prepares students for their independent research dissertation through dissertation fairs, lectures and a series of tutorials focusing upon the formulation and construction of a research proposal. The module also includes three lectures which explore career opportunities for Geography graduates and skills to enhance graduate employability.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG332 Dissertation Support: Geography

    This module provides structured, student-led peer-group support and academic staff group supervision for students undertaking the 30-credit 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module. This support and supervision is assessed through the submission of a PowerPoint Poster in TB1 and the submission in TB2 of an individually composed, critical and reflective log of the 5 dissertation peer-group meetings and the 4 group supervisory meetings (with a verified record of attendance at meetings). Working within a supervised Student Peer Group, you will also have the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This module complements the 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG333 Geographical Research Frontiers

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)