Professor Andrew R. Barron is the Sêr Cymru Chair of Low Carbon Energy and Environment, where his research involves the application of nanotechnology to fundamental problems in energy research.

He is the founder and director of the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI), a £38 million investment on the new Science and Innovation Campus which will concentrate elements of the University’s energy research with a unique focus on safety.

Educated at Imperial College (London), Professor Barron has held posts at the University Texas at Austin and Harvard and he continues to hold the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. - Welch Chair of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science at Rice University.

Professor Barron is the author of over 400 publications, 20 Patents, 5 books, and is the recipient of numerous awards including the Hümboldt Senior Scientist Research Award, the Corday Morgan Medal, the Meldola Medal, and the first Welch Foundation Norman Hackerman Award.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and in 2009 was appointed as the Prince of Wales Visiting Innovator. In 2011 he won both the Houston Technology Center's Lifetime Achievement Award in Nanotechnology and the World Technology Award for Materials.

 

Areas of Expertise

  • Energy
  • Nanotechnology
  • Oil & gas
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organometallic chemistry
  • Materials science

Publications

  1. Barron, A. Temperature-Induced Structural Transformations in Undoped and Eu3+-Doped Ruddlesden–Popper Phases Sr2SnO4 and Sr3Sn2O7: Relation to the Impedance and Luminescence Behaviors Inorganic Chemistry 58 17 11410 11419
  2. Barron, A. Analysis of commercial glasses with different strengthening treatments: Emphasis on the tin side, defects, structure connectivity and cracking behavior Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 518 1 9
  3. Barron, A. The recycling and reuse of steelmaking slags — A review Resources, Conservation and Recycling 146 244 255
  4. Barron, A. Investigation of the Reduction of a Molybdenum/Iron Molecular Nanocluster Single Source Precursor Inorganics 6 4 104
  5. Li, C., Barron, A., Owen, R. Propagation of a Plane Strain Hydraulic Fracture With a Fluid Lag in Permeable Rock Journal of Applied Mechanics 85 9 091003

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Teaching

  • EGSM31 Project Management

    At the end of this course, students will be able to recognise and define the key characteristics and components of a project. Understand the advantages/disadvantages associated with the management of both small and large projects. Have an appreciation of the strategic tools and techniques available to enable "Effective Project Management" as well as the concepts leading to the creation of a high performance team.

Supervision

  • Value Generation by Recovering By-Products from Steel Making Processes: Dezincification of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Slurry (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Dr David Warren
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Alvin Orbaek White
  • Engineering for the circular economy. Using nanotechnology to upcycle waste materials into higher value products such as carbon nanomaterials«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /» (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Alvin Orbaek White
  • Engineering of tailored membranes for specific separation (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Prof Nidal Hilal
  • The use of Steelmaking slags in marine applications (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • Accounting Conservatism and differences in corporate approaches (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Nicholas Rich
  • Various functionalized nanoparticles for enhanced oil recovery applications. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Shirin Alexander
  • Novel Nanomaterials and Surfactants as Emerging Platforms for Enhanced Fluid Flow Transport (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Shirin Alexander
  • CO2 management: defining the future long-term approach to sequestration and re-use (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • Homogenisation and Upscaling Modelling Technology for Oil & Gas Applications (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Chenfeng Li
  • Characterisation of metal slags (awarded 2019)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr David Warren
  • 'Development and Characterisation of an electrochemical cell for detection and extraction of Hydrogen' (awarded 2018)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Charlie Dunnill

Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI)

Professor Barron is facilitating the creation and growth of the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI).

The goal is to build the bridge from present energy infrastructure to a sustainable, affordable and secure energy future through the discover and implementation of new technology. Research within ESRI is aimed at realizing a future in which global energy demand is met by affordable energy from renewable and sustainable sources; however, with the realization that the near-term need is to maximize the availability and minimize the environmental impact derived from fossil fuels. 

ESRI is committed to the near-term need to maximize the availability of fossil fuels as well as the realization of a future in which global energy demand is met by affordable energy from renewable and sustainable sources. Key areas of research for ESRI include: making hydrocarbon recovery safe and environmentally responsible (through the development of new materials, new processes and computational science of rock fracture modelling), water usage and recycling, carbon dioxide capture and conversion, hydrogen as an energy vector, wave and tidal energy (including environmental impact), and energy management. 

Key areas of research for ESRI include: making hydrocarbon recovery safe and environmentally responsible (through the development of new materials, new processes and computational science of rock fracture modelling), water usage and recycling, carbon dioxide capture and conversion, hydrogen as an energy vector, wave and tidal energy, and energy management.