I am a specialist in the archaeology of ancient Egypt and Nubia. I am particularly interested in using material culture to explore broader cultural aspects, for example, colonial relations, shifting perceptions of the dead, or the relationship of material cultural boundaries to social groups within the Egyptian Nile Valley. My research draws on fieldwork projects in Egypt and the Sudan. I am an assistant director of the University of Michigan Abydos Middle Cemetery Project and I co-direct with Laurel Bestock (Brown University) the Uronarti Regional Archaeological Project. The focus of the latter work is the wonderful Middle Kingdom fortress on the island of Uronarti. I look forward to involving Swansea University students in both projects in the future.

I did my undergraduate and postgraduate at Macquarie University in Sydney and got my PhD in 2008 for a thesis completed as a guest at the Freie University in Berlin. Prior to my appointment at Swansea, I taught at Sydney University, Macquarie University, Monash University and the University of Vienna. Most recently, I was a post-doctoral researcher at the Austrian Academy of Sciences. I am currently completing a monograph based on that research titled Material Culture and Society: Abydos Assemblages from the Late Middle Kingdom until the Early New Kingdom. I also drink coffee.

Areas of Expertise

  • Archaeology
  • Egyptian Archaeology and Material Culture
  • Ancient Sudan
  • The Archaeology of Ancient Colonies

Publications

  1. Knoblauch, C. A New Group of Middle King dom Em balming Deposits? Another look at Pottery Dumps an d Repositories for Building Materials in Middle King dom Cemeteries Ägypten und Levante 26 329 356
  2. Knoblauch, C. Serving the Dead: Some Thoughts on Changes in Cultic Deposits at Abydos from the Late Old Kingdom to the Early Middle Kingdom (Ed.), Abydos: The Sacred Land at the Western Horizon Leuven Peeters
  3. Knoblauch, C. Between Egypt and Kerma: A Strange Tulip-Beaker from Mirgissa (Ed.), Studies on Ancient Egypt in Honour of Colin A. Hope Leuven Peeters
  4. Knoblauch, C. Middle Kingdom Fortresses (Ed.), Handbook of Ancient Nubia 367 392 De Gruyter
  5. Knoblauch, C. The Late Middle Kingdom in the Cemeteries at Mirgissa: Pottery and Relative Chronology Cahiers de la céramique égyptienne (CCE) Céramiques égyptiennes au Soudan ancien Importations, imitations et influences 11 47 72

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Teaching

  • CL-M09 Dissertation in Ancient History and or Classical Literature

    Dissertation in Ancient History or an approved Classical subject.

  • CL-M95 Enhanced research skills and methodology in Egyptology

    Egyptology is by nature a multi-disciplinary subject incorporating the fields of philology, art history, and scientific archaeology. However, while the opportunity to combine different types of approaches and datasets to examine the past is exciting, mastering the research and analysis of widely varying types of primary sources is a challenge. This module will provide students with the opportunity to develop state of the art research skills in each of the major sub-disciplines of Egyptology and introduce them to key research methodologies for each area. Through a mixture of formal lectures, seminars and in-class practical tasks, students should become competent in techniques that will allow them to conduct independent research of a high calibre.

  • CL-M97 Ancient Nubia. The archaeology of Egypt's neighbour in Africa

    In ancient Egyptian ideology the inhabitants of the gold-rich lands to the south of the First Nile Cataract were barbarians predestined to be dominated by Pharaoh and a people from whom nothing could be learned. Unsurprisingly, the reality was quite different. Not only was Nubia the place of origin for complex state societies that at times rivalled those in Egypt, but Nubia and its diverse populations were to have profound long-term effects on Egyptian culture and society. The proposed module would examine these issues through a review of key episodes of Egyptian-Nubian engagement. The unit would also analyse how ways of thinking about these episodes have evolved from early 20th century racist approaches that considered north-eastern Africa a battleground between light-skinned and dark-skinned races, to post-processualism and the identity-driven research of today.

  • CL-M98 A Game of Thrones: The Second Intermediate Period in Egypt

    The Second Intermediate Period, sometimes known as the Hyksos Period, is one of the most challenging and exciting periods of Egyptian history to study. Characterised by an unreliable and contested historical record, it is a period when a single new discovery, or a new reading of an old text, can revolutionise our understanding of historical and social processes. This was an era when the Nile Valley was ruled by different kingdoms, all competing for power and manoeuvring for advantage. However, it was also a period of major social and cultural change, which laid the groundwork for some of the most important developments of the golden age of the New Kingdom. This module examines the political, social and cultural history of the period, utilizing textual and archaeological evidence from Egypt, the Levant, and Nubia.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availability of supervisors and library material. This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLE120 Introduction to Ancient Egyptian History and Civilisation 1

    From the late fourth millennium BCE Egypt was one of the greatest political and military powers in the Near East, forming the one of the earliest examples of a nation state in that region. Not only did it create an enormously successful and long-lived governmental system that lasted in some form down to the establishment of Christianity in the country, but it played a key role in the destinies of neighbouring communities, in particular those of the Upper Nile Valley to the south and Syria-Palestine to the north-east. In addition, Egypt became a complex urban civilisation whose literature, art, and religion continue to be admired today. The relative abundance of surviving data permits a vivid insight into the conceptual and material world of the ancient inhabitants of the Nile Valley. This module thus focus on the political, social, and military history of Egypt from the Predynastic Period until the end of Dynasty 18 (circa 4400-1290 BCE) and introduces students to key aspects of Egyptian civilisation.

  • CLE121 Introduction to Ancient Egyptian History and Civilisation 2

    This module provides an overview of Egyptian history and civilisation from the beginning of Dynasty 19 until the Graeco-Roman Period (circa 1290 BCE-395 CE). It provides an essential foundation of knowledge for students pursuing an Egyptology degree scheme as well as an introduction to an ancient civilisation for nonspecialists.

  • CLE214 Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology

    The module forms an introduction to material culture studies based on examples from Egyptology, particularly objects from the University's Egypt Centre. It will explore the diversity of methodologies and debates concerning Egyptian archaeology. In doing so, it will introduce students to aspects of anthropological and archaeological theory, as well as the relationship between theory, field work, and the resulting interpretations.

  • CLE229 Ancient Egyptian Stories, Spells, Poems and Propaganda

    The Ancient Egyptians prided themselves on their eloquence, and this culture produced some of the earliest examples of major genres including narratives, spells, stories, poems, and propaganda. This module introduces the student to a range of texts in translation as well as the problems and methods of interpretation within the context of Ancient Egyptian culture.

  • CLE350 The archaeology of ancient Nubia - Egypt’s neighbour in Africa

    In ancient Egyptian ideology the inhabitants of the gold-rich lands to the south of the First Nile Cataract were barbarians predestined to be dominated by Pharaoh and a people from whom nothing could be learned. Unsurprisingly, the reality was quite different. Not only was Nubia the place of origin for complex state societies that at times rivalled those in Egypt, but Nubia and its diverse populations were to have profound long-term effects on Egyptian culture and society. The proposed module would examine these issues through a review of key episodes of Egyptian-Nubian engagement. The unit would also analyse how ways of thinking about these episodes have evolved from early 20th century racist approaches that considered north-eastern Africa a battleground between light-skinned and dark-skinned races, to post-processualism and the identity-driven research of today.

  • CLE398 A Game of Thrones: The Second Intermediate Period in Egypt

    The Second Intermediate Period, sometimes known as the Hyksos Period, was an era when the Nile Valley was ruled by different kingdoms, all competing for power and manoeuvring for advantage. However, it was also a period of major social and cultural change, which laid the groundwork for some of the most important developments of the golden age of the New Kingdom. This module examines the political, social and cultural history of the period, utilizing textual and archaeological evidence from Egypt, the Levant and Nubia.

Supervision

  • Amulets of the First Millennium BC in Lower Egypt (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Troy Sagrillo
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Troy Sagrillo