Dr Matthew Stevens
Senior Lecturer
History
Telephone: (01792) 295094
Room: Office - 102
First Floor
James Callaghan
Singleton Campus

I am interested in exploring the nature of everyday life (social, legal and economic) for ordinary persons in the Middle Ages.

The influence of the custom of coverture on medieval women’s lives; economic, legal and otherwise.

A comparative analysis of the medieval Anglo-Norman/English colonization of Wales and Ireland, and the Germanic colonization of (east) Prussia and the Baltic Sea costal regions.

Publications

  1. Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England. In Women and Credit in Pre-industrial Europe (Turnhout: Brepols). Turnhout: Brepols.
  2. London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression. The Economic History Review 69(4), 1083-1107.
  3. Teutonic Order, State of the. In J. C. MacKenzie (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Empire. -3). Wiley-Blackwell.
  4. Hidden histories in private hands: the Old Radnor Charter of 1318 and the need for a register of private pre-modern Welsh documents. Studia Celtica 49, 105-114.
  5. The Great Famine in Dyffryn Clwyd, 1315-1322. Denbighshire Historical Society Transactions 63, 13-35.

See more...

Teaching

  • HIH2001 Ancient and Historic Places (Study-Trip/Field project: History)

    Medieval Poland, Prussia and the Crusading Order of the Teutonic Knights Students will visit a variety of medieval and more recent sites of historical significance over the course of a roughly week-long journey around northern Poland. Sites will include the medieval city of Toru¿, the home of Nicolaus Copernicus, and Malbork Castle, seat of the Grandmaster of the Teutonic order. A series of lectures will precede the trip itself, during the Easter break. During the trip, students will be expected to undertake collaborative interpretive work on site. Refer to departmental literature for details. This module allows students to visit a particular place or region and to investigate historical problems in their original topographical context.

  • HIH2016 America in a Nutshell, A History of Pennsylvania from William Penn to Donald Trump 1631-2016

    This module surveys the political, social, cultural and economic history of the State of Pennsylvania. It allows students to explore the rich history of America as it is researched and taught by American historians with the Unites States, that is, through the lens of `state¿ history. This module will allow students to explore the foundation of a key British colony in North America, to follow its trajectory of growth and interaction with other colonies before the American Revolution and its trajectory of growth and interaction with both other states and the United States Federal Government from 1776 to 2010. This module aims to help students capture the nature of `state identity¿ in America, so fundamental to American political and social history. Students will be encouraged to view America as most Americans see it, looking out from within a state context, with all of the historical and historiographical considerations that approach entails. Some core strands are political, social and cultural life against the backdrop of colonial life, revolution, civil war, industrialisation and deindustrialisation.

  • HIH2016B America in a Nutshell: a History of Pennsylvania from William Penn to Donald Trump, 1631-2016

    This module surveys the political, social, cultural and economic history of the State of Pennsylvania. It allows students to explore the rich history of America as it is researched and taught by American historians with the Unites States, that is, through the lens of `state¿ history. This module will allow students to explore the foundation of a key British colony in North America, to follow its trajectory of growth and interaction with other colonies before the American Revolution and its trajectory of growth and interaction with both other states and the United States Federal Government from 1776 to 2010. This module aims to help students capture the nature of `state identity¿ in America, so fundamental to American political and social history. Students will be encouraged to view America as most Americans see it, looking out from within a state context, with all of the historical and historiographical considerations that approach entails. Some core strands are political, social and cultural life against the backdrop of colonial life, revolution, civil war, industrialisation and deindustrialisation.

  • HIH2069 The Crusades and the Making of Latin Christendom, 1050-1300

    The purpose of this module will be to examine the crusades by setting them in the context of the rapid expansion of Latin Christendom in the Middle Ages. The module will consider the crusades from the perspective of the Latin Christian society that created and sustained them, focussing on the major campaigns carried out to the Holy Land as well as the crusading expeditions to theatres including Byzantium, the Mediterranean, and within Western Europe. In so doing, it considers the impact of crusading activity at the 'periphery' or Europe - places including the Holy Land, Spain and Scandinavia - as well as at its 'core' - areas including France, Germany and the British Isles. The course will examine how the crusades influenced the military and cultural expansion of Latin Christendom in this era, as well as the impact of the crusading movement on ideas, institutions and developments within the heartlands of Europe.

  • HIHM04 Heritage Work Placement

    This module enables students to gain practical experience of working with a heritage organisation or project in a graduate-level role. Placements may involve the acquisition of skills in museum work, community projects, heritage interpretation and policy (but are not restricted to these areas). Group discussion and individual tutorials will support students in preparing an extended essay reflecting on their work experience in the context of literature on heritage and public history.

  • HIL227 Medieval Britain 1250-1461

    This module focuses on British history, 1250-1520, and investigates the relationship between the peoples of England, France, Scotland, Ireland and Wales during a period of intense warfare. It considers issues of domination, conquest, nationalism, patriotism and ethnicity, and looks at the nation as a social, economic and cultural unit (eg. the rise of the English language as a political and literary medium). By looking at the Jews and those termed `alien¿ in England, it also reflects on attitudes towards the `other¿ in medieval society.

  • HIMM00 Reading Medieval Manuscripts

    Medieval manuscript sources are crucial to our understanding of the Middle Ages. Research across the disciplines of medieval studies is grounded in the study and use of medieval books and documentary sources. This module aims to give students the skills, knowledge and confidence to engage with original manuscript sources of various types, from early Anglo-Saxon Gospel books to medieval chronicles, from illustrated books of hours to critical legal documents. Students will engage with these sources via digital and printed images and full-scale printed facsimiles, learning to recognise and transcribe medieval hands from all periods. Students will be given the chance to read original manuscripts during visits to the West Glamorgan Archive Service (Swansea) and the National Library of Wales (Aberystwyth). This module assumes no prior knowledge of medieval manuscripts, nor any prior knowledge of the medieval languages featured in the manuscript samples, including Latin, Old English and Middle English.

  • HIMM04 Introduction to Advanced Medieval Studies 2: Themes and Sources

    This module aims to apply the skills and approaches learned in the module HIMM01: Introduction to Advanced Medieval Studies 1: Skills and Approaches to a range of important themes in Medieval Studies, including gender, identity, laws and customs, spirituality, heritage. The module is interdisciplinary and draws on historical, literary and visual sources. The content of the module will be arranged in 2-weekly blocks, with the first week in each block dedicated to introducing students to the specific theme and the second week being used as a practical application of this knowledge to a source or text.

  • HIMM06 Directed Reading in Medieval Studies

    Under the guidance of an expert supervisor, students analyse developments in research and either historiography or literary criticism, relating to a topic in Medieval Studies which they choose from a wide range of options.

Supervision

  • Apprenticeship Indentures in England, 1250-1500 (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Deborah Youngs
  • not sure if should be amended potential shift of focus towards well-being agenda. «br /» Innovative Approaches to Mapping the Historic Landscape Character of Space and Place in South Wales (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Alexander Langlands
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Daniel Power