Dr Krijn Peters
Associate Professor
Political and Cultural Studies
Telephone: (01792) 295183
Room: Office - 030
Ground Floor
James Callaghan
Singleton Campus

I joined the department in 2010 having been a lecturer at the Centre for Development Studies, Swansea University since 2005. I obtained my PhD at Wageningen University, the Netherlands, undertaking an investigation into armed conflict and post-war reintegration trajectories of young ex-combatants in Sierra Leone, West Africa. My BSc and MSc were in rural development sociology, again at Wageningen University, for which I undertook fieldwork in Sierra Leone and Cambodia. In 2000 I worked a year for Save the Children UK evaluating their ex-child soldier reintegration project in Liberia. Lately most of my work focuses on rural access and transportation. In 2017 I started a new interdisciplinary MSc in Sustainable Engineering Management for International Development, together with colleagues from the College of Engineering at Swansea. I have provided consultancy services for a number of international organisations, including the World Bank, Plan International, the Institute for Security Studies, the Dutch Royal Institute of the Tropics and the DfID-funded Research for Community Access Partnership.

Publications

  1. Afukaar, F., Damsere-Derry, J., Peters, K., & Starkey, P. Rural Transport Services Indicators: Using a new mixed-methods methodology to inform policy in Ghana. Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, 3, 100074
  2. Peters, K. Sierra Leone. Africa Yearbook: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2018Brill
  3. Jenkins, J., Mokuwa, E., Peters, K., & Richards, P. Changing women's lives and livelihoods: motorcycle taxis in rural Liberia and Sierra Leone. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Transport, 173(2), 132-143.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1680/jtran.18.00162
  4. Peters, K. Sierra Leone. Africa Yearbook: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2017Brill

See more...

Teaching

  • EG-D10 Team Project & Individual Dissertation

    The module is where this program ultimately culminates with the final development stages and realisation of a team based project (as defined at the recruitment stage) with individual aspects considered and assessed as a final dissertation submission. The nature of the dissertation will be dependent on the nature of the specialisation of the participant. During the period of this module, a preparatory period will be followed by participants spending (or utilising remote engineering techniques) a period of circa. 3 weeks in-country delivering the project, with support from academic team leads and other supporting staff, stakeholders or collaborators. This will be concluded with a debrief and final dissertation writing period.

  • EG-D11 Team Project & Individual Dissertation (Engineers)

    The module is where this program culminates with the final development stages and realisation of a team based project with individual aspects considered and assessed as a final dissertation submission. The nature of the dissertation will be dependent on the nature of the specialisation of the participant. During this module, a preparatory period will be followed by participants spending (or utilising remote engineering techniques) a period of circa. 3 weeks in-country delivering the project, with support from academic team leads and other supporting staff, stakeholders or collaborators. This will be concluded with a debrief and final dissertation writing period, a group presentation and an individual viva voce.

  • PO-3320 Researching Politics 2

    Researching Politics 2 (RP2) is the follow-on module from RP1 and it acts as the culmination for the subject knowledge and transferable skills developed in that module. RP2 puts the creative emphasis in the hands of the students, with the module convenor and topic tutors giving guidance and feedback to facilitate the realisation of research conceived, developed, executed and presented by students. In this way, it tries to approximate the worlds of further study and work into which students will be progressing following the completion of their degree schemes. It is a module where all of the summative assessments are comprised of group work, although individual marks can be varied depending on each student¿s performance. Students are also required to submit an individual self-assessment, detailing what they have learned about their own strengths and weaknesses on the basis of the sustained group work. In RP2, you will extend and deepen the research undertaken in RP1 and continue to meet regularly in order to share ideas, opinions and sources in your groups. These meetings will include several where the topic tutor provides guidance and feedback as well as those where the meetings are student-led.

  • PO-M25 Dissertation

    Individual research based, under the guidance of appointed supervisor.

  • PO-M63 Rights-based Approaches to Development

    Rights-based approaches to development (RBAD) are now part of a new orthodoxy with respect to policy and practice in support of international development. They have become popular in part because they provide a language for analysing poverty as a complex and multi-dimensional phenomena and for analysing governance as a process that responds directly to people¿s needs, entitlements and rights. They direct attention to aspects of poverty which have traditionally been neglected in development policy at national and international levels. This module examines the background to rights-based approaches to development. Particular attention will is paid to the four separate arenas in which RBADs are now evident: development practice, development discourse; the policy commitments of donors and governments; and the obligations imposed on donors and governments by international human rights law. The module examines the implications of rights-based approaches for development policy and practice in the context of two contradictory phenomena: a system of international relations based on the principle of state sovereignty and the complex phenomenon of `globalis ation¿. Issues that arise in relation to the rights of indigenous peoples and children will be used as ways of examining the situation of vulnerable groups.

  • PO-M64 Violence, Conflict and Development

    Violence and conflict have been enduring and widespread obstacles to the promotion of sustainable development throughout the latter half of the twentieth century, and the 21st century looks set to continue this pattern. This module examines the roots and causes of conflict and violence in developing nations and explores how and why such conflict emerge even between hitherto seemingly peacefully co-existing communities. The module asks what impact protracted and violent conflict can have upon development prospects and democratisation processes, and examines national and international responses to violence and conflict mediation processes and systems. The module also explores soome of the arguments surrounding the use of aid in conflict situations, and examines the extent to which development aid and emergency relief can assist in perpetuating a state of conflict.

  • PO-M75 Introduction to Development Studies

    We are increasingly moving towards a globalised world. Nevertheless, there are still huge socio-economic and political differences between countries and within countries. A key question for many nations in the Global South is how to achieve inclusive and sustained socio-economic development and reduce poverty. Engineering solutions have and still are considered as essential in achieving this: building roads and bridges or providing water-pumps or electricity are seen as important ways to alleviate a nation and its people out of poverty. But at the same time it is recognized that just providing these solutions is not sufficient: education and training are equally important for development, as is for instance ensuring gender equality. The scholarly discipline of Development Studies has studied this important question of how to develop countries for the last 70 years or so. Over these decades many different models and approaches have been tried, by national governments but also by supra-national bodies such as the World Bank or the IMF as well as by Non-Governmental Organisations and Civil Society groups, such as Oxfam or Action-Aid. In this module an overview of Development as a planned intervention is provided, and the different development models and approaches are critically assessed. We also look ahead to the Sustainable Development Goals, which have replaced the Millennium Development Goals as the global agenda for development.

  • PO-M75A Introduction to Development Studies

    We are increasingly moving towards a globalised world. Nevertheless, there are still huge socio-economic and political differences between countries and within countries. A key question for many nations in the Global South is how to achieve inclusive and sustained socio-economic development and reduce poverty. Engineering solutions have and still are considered as essential in achieving this: building roads and bridges or providing water-pumps or electricity are seen as important ways to alleviate a nation and its people out of poverty. But at the same time it is recognized that just providing these solutions is not sufficient: education and training are equally important for development, as is for instance ensuring gender equality. The scholarly discipline of Development Studies has studied this important question of how to develop countries for the last 70 years or so. Over these decades many different models and approaches have been tried, by national governments but also by supra-national bodies such as the World Bank or the IMF as well as by Non-Governmental Organisations and Civil Society groups, such as Oxfam or Action-Aid. In this module an overview of Development as a planned intervention is provided, and the different development models and approaches are critically assessed. We also look ahead to the Sustainable Development Goals, which have replaced the Millennium Development Goals as the global agenda for development.

  • PO-M76 Socio-economic and political implications of engineering solutions

    Engineering solutions are developed for what is often a highly complex socio-economic and political environment. For engineering solutions to be implemented in the Global South, unfamiliarity with the local culture and practices further adds to this complexity. Many sound solutions and interventions from an engineering perspective have failed to deliver the outcomes, or delivered unintended and non-preferred outcomes, because the engineers were not aware of this context (or choose to ignore it). This module will provide an introduction to the most common pitfalls and how these can be overcome. It then allows the students to get a hands-on experience with the complexity of the context in which their engineering solutions do take place, via an especially designed simulation exercise, making them aware of cultural barriers, conflicting political interests and policies and non-collaborative donor and state institutions.

  • PO-M77 Monitoring & Impact Evaluation for International Development

    Engineering solutions are designed to make an impact in the real world, and for many engineering solutions for the developing world this impact is ultimately poverty reduction and enhancing the quality of people's lives. But how and when do we measure the anticipated impact of an intervention. When do we know if something really has worked and made a difference? And will thinking about the impact - and how to measure this - help us to better understand the present or pre-intervention state - the base-line condition. And equally important, once the intervention is under way, how can we ensure that all actors work according to plan and that both contingencies and unexpected developments are detected and dealt with rather than derailing the process. A rigorous and scientific approach to monitoring and evaluation is key to achieve the gold standard in development interventions.

  • PO-M78 Tools for International Development

    This module is a practical skills-orientated course aimed at enhancing the planning and management capabilities of those already working in development or wishing to become development professionals. An important focus is on skills acquisition, and there is a strong emphasis on student-led learning, planning exercises, individual and group presentations, and case-study work. It is the only module open for non-engineers in the Semester 2 streams. It builds on some of skills acquired in Semester 2 module 'Monitoring & Impact Evaluation" but also introduces a whole set of new tools for international development, aimed to increase the success rate and impact of any development intervention, whether of an engineering nature or social or economic one.

  • PO-M93 Analysing Politics and International Relations

    This module aims to introduce students to the core methods of data collection and analysis. In addition to discussing selected research methods drawing on the previous research on research methodologies, it offers an opportunity to practice using them for small-scale real-life research. The module contributes to the students¿ understanding of research methods and to their ability to choose research methodologies appropriately for their future MA dissertations and develops their practical research skills for a dissertation and in the future workplace.

  • WS-200 Contemporary Wars and Conflicts

    This module introduces and critically explores contemporary warfare and conflict, from post WWII up to the present War on Terror. It considers the de-colonization/independence wars; the Cold War proxy conflicts; post-1990 New Wars and the War on Terror.

Supervision

  • 'Inspiring Gentrification’«br /» «br /» To what extent do mega sporting events provide a sustainable path to development?«br /» «br /» (current)

    MA
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • Analysing Contemporary land tenure and the impact of Land Reforms on Rural peoples’ Livelihood in face of Customary Land in Zambia. (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Alison Hann
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • There is a slight adjustment in the tittle of my research thesis as this has been communicated by supervisor before this time : Note the new tittle is :«br /»«br /»«br /» Assessing Transitional Justice Mechanisms and their potential for supporting the Relief, Rehabilitation and Development Continuum in Postwar Sierra Leone – A missed opportunity (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Roland Axtmann
  • British Counterinsurgency and Security Sector Reform: The Long-term Consequences of Prioritising Security over Development (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Dennis Schmidt
  • “From weapons to wheels: assessing the impact of track construction for motorbike taxis on rural youth in Liberia”. (awarded 2020)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • 'A Political Economy Analysis of Agricultural Development of Turkey's South-eastern Anatolia Region' (awarded 2019)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Mr Robert Bideleux
  • '''Achieving Good Governance and Development in Nigeria through Decentralization:A Case Study of Ondo State''' (awarded 2018)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • 'Social Analysis and the Development Enterprise: A case of World Health Organisation Country Programme in Nigeria' (awarded 2018)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Gerard Clarke
  • Evaluating the effects of training on women's political participation and representation in Nigeria. (awarded 2018)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Roland Axtmann