Fritz-Gregor Herrmann’s area of research is Ancient Philosophy and Literature, with a focus on Plato and Greek Tragedy. His special interest is the relationship between words and ideas, and the ways in which traditions and innovations in language influence the ways thoughts are developed, formulated, expressed and presented – and vice versa. He is currently working on Plato’s Republic as a literary text that responds to historical and political events as much as to earlier poetry, science and philosophy. He is part of a team of editors of the new Oxford Classical Text (OCT) of Plato, vol.2, to appear in due course. His teaching covers Ancient Philosophy and Literature as well as Greek and Latin Language. Past and present PhD research areas supervised include: Plato’s Philosophy; Greek Tragedy; Greek Thought in the Roman Empire.

Areas of Expertise

  • Ancient Philosophy
  • Plato
  • Presocratics
  • Greek Literature
  • Aeschylus
  • Greek Language
  • Latin Language
  • Comparative Philology
  • Ancient History

Publications

  1. Herrmann, F. Spartan Echoes in Plato's Republic P. Cartledge, A. Powell(Ed.), Superpower Sparta : Sparta in the self-definition of the Athenians, eds. P. Cartledge and A. Powell 99 128 Swansea Classical Press of Wales
  2. Herrmann, F. Plato’s Phoenikika — a Royal Lie in the Republic (Ed.), Some Organic Readings of Narrative Groningen Barkhuis
  3. Herrmann, F. Hat Kritias nach Spartas Pfeife getanzt V. Pothou, A. Powell(Ed.), Das Antike Sparta 133 155 Stuttgart Franz Steiner Verlag
  4. Herrmann, F. Plato and Critias D. Cairns, N. Rabinowitz(Ed.), La muse au long couteau : Critias, de la création littéraire à la terreur d’Etat; Scripta Antiqua 107 83 116 Bordeaux Editions Ausonius
  5. Herrmann, F. Poetry in Plato’s Gorgias P. Destree, F.G. Herrmann(Ed.), Plato and the Poets 21 40 Leiden Brill, Mnemosyne Supplements

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Teaching

  • CL-M00 Word, Metaphor, Allegory: Effective Models of Reality

    ...

  • CL-M09 Dissertation in Ancient History and or Classical Literature

    Dissertation in Ancient History or an approved Classical subject.

  • CL-M27 Greek Texts 2

    For students who have studied Greek for at least three years. Practicing ancient Greek language and interpretative skills at an advanced level through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

  • CL-M53A Postgraduate Intermediate Greek 2

    JACT, Reading Greek

  • CL-M55A Postgraduate Further Greek 2

    For students with prior experience of learning Ancient Greek, at the level appropriate for entry into Further Greek. Consolidates and extends ancient Greek language skills through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

  • CLC101 Of Gods and Heroes - Greek Mythology

    Greek mythology for us represents the beginnings of Western Civilisation. Greek myths are gripping tales in their own right, and through reception in literature and art they tell their own story as well as the story of those who received them, from Greek and Roman times to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This module introduces the greatest of all Greek heroes, Herakles, as seen through the eyes of archaic and classical Greeks, from the Homeric epics to the Attic tragedians of the fifth century BC. At the centre of the module will be four tragedies by Sophocles and Euripides, which will be studied both as self-contained plays produced for public performance and as part of an ongoing discourse negotiating the character of Herakles in an age of social, political and cultural change.

  • CLC103 Introduction to Ancient Philosophy and Rhetoric

    An introduction to philosophical argument in the dialogue form.

  • CLC206 Reading Classical Civilisation

    An introduction to some central themes and approaches in the study of Classical Civilisation.

  • CLC211 Plato's Republic

    This module focuses on the significance of Plato's 'Republic' for contemporary discourse about educational, ethical, aesthetic, political, and religious issues, through a close reading of the primary text. It examines the historical background of its genesis, the plausability of its central arguements, and the controversies over its interpretation.

  • CLC312 Plato's Republic

    This module focuses on the significance of Plato's 'Republic' for contemporary discourse about educational, ethical, aesthetic, political, and religious issues, through a close reading of the primary text. It examines the historical background of its genesis, the plausability of its central arguements, and the controversies over its interpretation.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availability of supervisors and library material. This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLG126 Further Greek 2 (Level 1)

    For students with prior experience of learning Ancient Greek, at the level appropriate for entry into Further Greek. Consolidates and extends ancient Greek language skills through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

  • CLG226 Further Greek 2 (Level 2)

    For students who have completed Intermediate Greek 1 & 2 in Year 1 or who have experience of learning Ancient Greek, at the level appropriate for entry into Further Greek. Consolidates and extends ancient Greek language skills through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language..

  • CLG228 Advanced Greek 2 (Level 2)

    For students who have completed Further Greek 1 & 2 in Year 1. Practicing ancient Greek language and interpretative skills at an advanced level through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

  • CLG326 Further Greek 2 (Level 3)

    For students who have completed Intermediate Greek 1 & 2 in Year 1 or Year 2 or who have experience of learning Ancient Greek, at the level appropriate for entry into Further Greek. Consolidates and extends ancient Greek language skills through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

  • CLG328 Advanced Greek 2 (Level 3)

    For students who have completed Further Greek 1 & 2 in Year 2. Practicing ancient Greek language and interpretative skills at an advanced level through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

  • CLG330 Advanced Greek 4

    For students who have completed Advanced Greek 1 & 2 in Year 2. Practicing ancient Greek language and interpretative skills at an advanced level through the study of one or more texts, normally verse, in the original language.

Supervision

  • The Representation of Gods and Divine Beings in Chariton's 'Kallirhoe' (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Ian Repath