After completing her undergraduate English degree at the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland and a Masters in the Diversity of Contemporary Writing at Swansea University, Alexia undertook a P.G.C.E. in Secondary Education, before returning to full-time study at Swansea.
Her doctoral thesis, ‘“Desert of the Real”: Simulation and Assimilation in Contemporary Cinema’, analyses science fiction cinema’s relationship to technology, utilising Jean Baudrillard’s theories on technology, cinema and the disappearance of the ‘real’.
Alexia is part-time tutor in the English Literature and Language Department and an Associate Tutor with DACE. She teaches on the undergraduate modules ALE120 Studying the English Language; ALE116 A History of English; ALE218 Discourse Analysis, and the Humanities (literature/ film) programme within DACE.
Alexia is currently admissions tutor for the language section within the English Literature and Language department.

Publications

  1. ‘Killing romance’ by ‘giving birth to love’: Hélène Cixous, Jane Campion and the language of In the Cut (2003). Feminist Theory, 146470011880444
  2. & (2014). The Representation of Science and Scientists in Film, ’Science Café' contributor, BBC Radio 3 Wales.
  3. (2013). 'Film and Female Consciousness: Irigaray, Cinema and Thinking Women' (by Lucy Bolton). (FWSA Blog).
  4. Towards a New Sexual Conservatism in Postfeminist Romantic Comedy. In Nadine Muller and Joel Gwynne (Ed.), Postfeminism and Contemporary Hollywood Cinema. (pp. 185-203). London: Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. (2013). Review of 'Fifty Shades of Feminism' (by Susie Orbach, Lisa Appignaneisi and Rachel Holmes [eds.]). (FWSA Website). : FWSA.

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Teaching

  • ALE116 A History of the English Language

    This module covers the history of the English language, tracing its development from its beginnings as part of the Indo-European family of languages, through its various changes through Old, Middle and Modern English. You will examine the processes through which a standard (English) evolves and you will be introduced to selected texts from different periods of the English language. The module will provide a foundation for further study into language variation and change, as well as the social, cul-tural and political conditions/contexts for linguistic development and evolution.

  • ALE120 Studying the English Language

    How did English becoma a global language? What exactly is Standard English? What do slips of the tongue reveal about language? ALE120 Studying the English Language answers these questions and many more. The module is an introduction to the diversity and history of English, and to relevant contemporary and classic work in linguistics. Other topics discussed in the lectures and accompanying course-book include the effects of dialect and accent on identity, swearing and offensive names in English, language and gender, language planning and theories about the origin of language. The course-book, Studying the English language, by Rob Penhallurick (Palgrave, 2010, 2nd edition), is the backbone to the module:the weekly lectures add further detail and discussion, and are supplemented by some seminar-class meetings.

  • DAD100 Bright Lights, Big City: From the Flâneur to the Modern Metropolis

    More than half the world¿s population today lives in cities; spaces which are often viewed paradoxically and simultaneously as sites of industry, creativity and pleasure, full of possibility for the individual but also as imbued with the fragmenting and alienating effects of urbanism. In this sense, scholars of the urban have noted that cities are `not simply material or lived spaces ¿ they are also spaces of the imagination and spaces of representation¿. It is this exchange; between the material, lived reality and creative representations of the city and its inhabitants that the module seeks to investigate. This module explores changing representations of the city from the Victorian period through to the late twentieth century, across a variety of texts and genres. Through the lens of three major cities: London, Paris and New York, we will think about the ways in which cities have been written about and theorised, and the historical and social tensions underlying cultural constructions of the urban. Focusing on figures such as the flaneur, ideas of utopian or dystopian spaces and psychogeography, we will assess the way in which texts present a kind of psychological as well as physical `map¿ of the city. An interdisciplinary module, we explore the representation of 'the city' through a range of writings including literature, essays, theory, photography and film, allowing students to develop a broad understanding of `the city¿ as reflective of and vital to contemporary cultural production.

  • DAD101 Ways of Reading: Approaches to Literature, Film and Culture

    Theory: often perceived as esoteric, impenetrable and as obscuring the pleasures of engagement with literature, art and culture. It is undeniable that theory and critical approaches to cultural artefacts demand careful reading and close attention to often difficult and complex concepts. However, it is also true to say that literature itself offers a multiplicity of meanings and often sparks vigorous debate, revealing assumptions in our reading practices and the situated nature of the ways in which we view the cultural products we encounter. Thus exposure to a range of perspectives in this module will equip students with an analytical, critical and informed way of reading and thinking (key skills in a changing world), as well as a grounding in the vocabulary and conceptual tools that will be of use in future modules. As an introductory module, students will encounter some of the central ideas and debates in the interpretation of texts in literature, film and culture, and the module will ask several key questions: What is the nature and function of literature, art and culture? What is the relationship between literature and theory? What is the role of the author? How are ideas such as race, sexuality, being human, gender and class constructed in and through texts? As a result, this module will allow students to have a greater understanding of the relationship between literary study and a broader cultural critique.

  • DAD1030 Tales of Terror: Ghosts, Monsters and Other Anxieties in Literature, Film and Culture (i)

    Do you wonder how and why particular novels such as Dracula or The Haunting of Hill House continue to have a wide and critical appeal? Do you think about why films such as Stanley Kubrick¿s The Shining or Ridley Scott¿s Alien, continue to send shivers down your spine, even on repeat viewings? What do these `tales of terror¿ tell us about ourselves and the world in which we live? Do they shed a light on cultural anxieties and particular periods in history, or are they pure escapism? How do they tap into our most intimate fears and desires, and how are they expressed and represented in our literary and cinematic culture? In this module you will study range of literature (including poetry, novels and short stories) and cinematic texts, which focus on and explore the shadowy worlds created through figures of fear, feelings of excess and paranoia, and texts that test the limits of reason, or `what we know¿, creating blurred boundaries between what is real and what is imagined. The module will examine representations of cultural anxiety, repressed desires and fantasies, debating the genre conventions and historical traditions of the literature and film of the uncanny. We will explore some pertinent concepts such as `terror and transgression¿, `the Other¿, `the Uncanny¿, and `the Sublime¿, as well as issues such as the body, gender, space and place, the figure of the child, and the relationship between man and science.

  • DAD1031 Tales of Terror: Ghosts, Monsters and Other Anxieties in Literature, Film and Culture (ii)

    Do you wonder how and why particular novels such as Dracula or The Haunting of Hill House continue to have a wide and critical appeal? Do you think about why films such as Stanley Kubrick¿s The Shining or Ridley Scott¿s Alien, continue to send shivers down your spine, even on repeat viewings? What do these `tales of terror¿ tell us about ourselves and the world in which we live? Do they shed a light on cultural anxieties and particular periods in history, or are they pure escapism? How do they tap into our most intimate fears and desires, and how are they expressed and represented in our literary and cinematic culture? In this module you will study range of literature (including poetry, novels and short stories) and cinematic texts, which focus on and explore the shadowy worlds created through figures of fear, feelings of excess and paranoia, and texts that test the limits of reason, or `what we know¿, creating blurred boundaries between what is real and what is imagined. The module will examine representations of cultural anxiety, repressed desires and fantasies, debating the genre conventions and historical traditions of the literature and film of the uncanny. We will explore some pertinent concepts such as `terror and transgression¿, `the Other¿, `the Uncanny¿, and `the Sublime¿, as well as issues such as the body, gender, space and place, the figure of the child, and the relationship between man and science.

  • DAD274 Ways of Reading: Approaches to Literature, Film and Culture.

    Theory: often perceived as esoteric, impenetrable and as obscuring the pleasures of engagement with literature, art and culture. It is undeniable that theory and critical approaches to cultural artefacts demand careful reading and close attention to often difficult and complex concepts. However, it is also true to say that literature itself offers a multiplicity of meanings and often sparks vigorous debate, revealing assumptions in our reading practices and the situated nature of the ways in which we view the cultural products we encounter. Thus exposure to a range of perspectives in this module will equip students with an analytical, critical and informed way of reading and thinking (key skills in a changing world), as well as a grounding in the vocabulary and conceptual tools that will be of use in future modules. As an introductory module, students will encounter some of the central ideas and debates in the interpretation of texts in literature, film and culture, and the module will ask several key questions: What is the nature and function of literature, art and culture? What is the relationship between literature and theory? What is the role of the author? How are ideas such as race, sexuality, being human, gender and class constructed in and through texts? As a result, this module will allow students to have a greater understanding of the relationship between literary study and a broader cultural critique.

  • DAD275 Bright Lights, Big City: From the Flâneur to the Modern Metropolis

    More than half the world¿s population today lives in cities; spaces which are often viewed paradoxically and simultaneously as sites of industry, creativity and pleasure, full of possibility for the individual but also as imbued with the fragmenting and alienating effects of urbanism. In this sense, scholars of the urban have noted that cities are `not simply material or lived spaces ¿ they are also spaces of the imagination and spaces of representation¿. It is this exchange; between the material, lived reality and creative representations of the city and its inhabitants that the module seeks to investigate. This module explores changing representations of the city from the Victorian period through to the late twentieth century, across a variety of texts and genres. Through the lens of three major cities: London, Paris and New York, we will think about the ways in which cities have been written about and theorised, and the historical and social tensions underlying cultural constructions of the urban. Focusing on figures such as the flaneur, ideas of utopian or dystopian spaces and psychogeography, we will assess the way in which texts present a kind of psychological as well as physical `map¿ of the city. An interdisciplinary module, we explore the representation of 'the city' through a range of writings including literature, essays, theory, photography and film, allowing students to develop a broad understanding of `the city¿ as reflective of and vital to contemporary cultural production.

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Admissions Tutor for Linguistics - Swansea University

    2016 - Present

Career History

Start Date End Date Position Held Location
2016 Present Tutor ELL, Swansea University
2014 2015 Research Assistant to Prof. Nuria Lorenzo-Dus ELL, Swansea University
2012 Present Study Skills Tutor DACE, Swansea University
2013 2015 Visiting Lecturer Worcester University
2009 Present Associate Tutor DACE, Swansea University
2007 2016 Teaching Assistant ELL, Swansea University

External Responsibilities

  • Peer Reviewer, Adaptation (OUP)

    2009 - Present

Research Groups

  • Ordinary Member

    GENCAS (Centre for Research into Gender and Culture in Society, Swansea University)

  • Ordinary Member

    FWSA (Feminist and Women’s Studies Association)