I studied for my BSc in Biomedical Science at Bangor University, and become a HCPC-registered Biomedical Scientist in 2010. Further to this, I completed my PhD in the field of Cancer Research at Bangor University, investigating molecular mechanisms of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Using the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe,my research focussed on elucidating the roles of novel variants of the S-phase effector kinase, Cds1Chk2. During this time I also lectured on the Biomedical Science and Medical Science BSc degree programmes at Bangor University, and successfully achieved Fellow status with the Higher Education Academy.

In 2016 I moved to Swansea University Medical School and began my position as a Lecturer and Deputy Admissions Tutor for the Applied Medical Sciences and Applied Medical Sciences with Foundation Year BSc degree programmes. In my teaching and learning practice, I have a particular interest in the use of digital media in education, and science communication. I am part of the SUMS Athena SWAN group, the organisation team for Soapbox Science, and I am a board member for Oriel Science

Teaching

  • PM-001 Metabolism and Homeostasis

    The module will provide the student with a broad overview of dietary requirements, digestion processes and associated anatomy, nutrient uptake and energetic metabolism processes within the human body. The catabolism of biomolecules for energy production will be covered and the role of the kidney in removal of by-products. The role of neuronal and hormonal systems in homeostatic control of the body will also be elaborated.

  • PM-008 Foundation Applied Medical Sciences Skills Development 2

    The module will provide the student with a diversity of laboratory and scientific skills in relation to the undertaking of undergraduate practical sessions in a safe manner and develop skills including molarity calculations, biological extractions, basic chromatography, an introduction into anatomical dissection and physiology.

  • PM-139 Human Physiology I

    This module aims to provide an understanding of the structure and function of key physiological systems of the human body. Human physiology is the study of how our body works in an integrated way. A central principle of human physiology is homeostasis, the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment. Failure to maintain homeostasis disrupts normal function that may lead to disease (or pathophysiology). Students will be taught the key concepts of homeostasis in the physiological systems of the body, enabling the student to understand the consequences of pathophysiology to human health. Students will gain practical experience in assessing physiological function during two laboratory based exercises.

  • PM-140 Anatomy

    This module will help to discover the anatomy of the human body in a systems based approach (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculo-skeletal, respiratory and nervous systems). Anatomy is a fundamental science and supports many areas of biology and medicine. As such, the topics chosen for this module are those most useful to other areas of biological science, with clinical significance. This module will be delivered through lectures and practical classes with demonstrators leading practical and self-studying activities. Support materials and laboratory space for self-directed learning, including prosections, plastic anatomical models, bones and skeletons, and computer based anatomical models will be available.

  • PM-141 Human Physiology II

    This module aims to provide students with further understanding of human physiology through studies on systems physiology including the endocrine, renal, blood, digestive/metabolism and reproductive system. The module will equally describe how malfunction of physiological systems gives rise to disease, using specific examples to enable students to appreciate the relationship between physiology/anatomy and medicine. Fundamental principles of physiology will be illustrated with appropriate clinical examples and during practical assignments.

  • PM-148 Foundations of Community Medicine

    Communities now play a key role in improving and sustaining good health and the delivery of care. This has led to the development of a new field within medical education and practice called Community Medicine. Community Medicine is often considered synonymous with Preventative and Social Medicine (PSM), Public Health, and Community Health because of a shared concern with the prevention of disease and promotion of health and wellbeing. This module introduces students to the wide range of approaches encompassed within Community Medicine. These include preventative, promotive, curative and rehabilitative approaches aimed at improving population health through community-based health and care.

  • PM-254C Meddygon, Cleifion a Nodau Meddygaeth

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  • PM-255 Introduction to Health Informatics

    This is an introductory module aimed at those new to health informatics. It introduces students to the basic concepts and theories of Health Informatics, and explores the use of these in a variety of healthcare settings within national and global contexts. It will trace the origins, development and scope of Health Informatics, and identify contemporary issues at the forefront of the discipline. The module will also explore some of the roles that Health Informatics professionals might have within health and social care organisations.

  • PM-256 Communicating Medical Sciences

    An important aspect of the role of scientists concerns the communication of complex scientific ideas and research to non-specialist audiences. This module will explore methods of science communication including public events and campaigns and through digital and social media. There will be a focus on visual communication techniques (such as digital storytelling and infographics) to facilitate engagement and presentation of information for different audiences. Students will be required to create a poster, write an abstract, and write and deliver a podcast (digital audio file).

  • PM-271 Population Health & The Art of Research 2

    This module builds upon PM-269 Population Health and the art of research 1 and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to further develop their research skills by undertaking data analysis and interpretation of the results of a small-scale research study. Students will also gain an insight into the mechanisms through which research findings can be disseminated to the scientific community, and the importance of engaging the public in research.

  • PM-338 Teaching Science In Schools

    This module is for students with an interest in entering teaching, and involves placements in local schools The student will engage both in observation and in various teaching activities. The module will be assessed through various methods including a written report and the teachers report.

  • PM-344 Capstone Project

    The aim of this module is to provide a capstone experience to students┬┐ learning, through participating in their own enquiry-based research project. Depending on the student's employability strand within the programme, the project may be laboratory, data, or education-based, but it will always involve a research question that is drawn from the literature, focused on a topic relevant to medical science. It will ask a novel research question and involve the critical analysis of research findings. Students will refine their oral and written communication skills to a graduate level through creating an introductory presentation on the project background, and a written dissertation and oral presentation on their research conclusions.

  • PM-354 Cancer Pharmacology

    Cancer remains a significant cause of mortality in the modern world. Current and emerging chemotherapies, and the rationale, experimental, and clinical evidence of the pathways or molecules targeted will be explored. Causes of treatment-related side effects, and the therapies used to address these, will be discussed along with the mechanisms that lead to anti-cancer drug resistance.

  • PM-401 Science Communication

    This module will encompass a range of communication modes, from presentation of science to the general public to making a pitch for funding to `investors┬┐ The module will be run as a series of online seminars to prepare, firstly, for a short 3 minute thesis-like presentations to both a professional and non-professional audience. This will be complemented by preparation of short, New Scientist-style articles by each student on the topic of their presentation. Students will be assigned a topic that is appropriate to their degree title. For example, a Medical Geneticist could address recent advances in gene therapy. Subsequently, their task will be to produce a pitch to attract investment to commercialise their research. In the latter half of the module, the focus will be on skills-training for writing a scientific paper, preparing the ground for their project dissertations.