Professor
Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences
Telephone: (01792) 205678 ext 8521
Room: Office - 137
First Floor
Haldane Building
Singleton Campus

Michael is a mental health services researcher with an interest in working alongside people who use services to research how these are experienced with the aim of generating new evidence to improve healthcare.

Areas of Expertise

  • mental health
  • service delivery and organisation
  • qualitative research

Publications

  1. & Care Coordination as Imagined, Care Coordination as Done: Findings from a Cross-national Mental Health Systems Study. International Journal of Integrated Care 18(3)
  2. & Traditions of research in community mental health care planning and care coordination: A systematic meta-narrative review of the literature. PLOS ONE 13(6), e0198427
  3. & Mental health care coordination. In Essentials of Mental Health Nursing. (pp. 354-367). London: Sage.
  4. & Cross-national mixed-methods comparative case study of recovery-focused mental health care planning and co-ordination in acute inpatient mental health settings (COCAPP-A). Health Services and Delivery Research 5(26), 1-234.
  5. & Reluctance to fail nursing students in practice-implications for nurse managers. Journal of Nursing Management 25(7), 489-490.

See more...

Teaching

  • SHGM08 Working in Community and Primary Health Care Practice

    A review of community nursing education programmes throughout Wales (commissioned by the Welsh Assembly Government in 2006) led to the decision that future provision of education for practitioners working in the community will focus on a modularised approach. This modularised approach enables the provision of an educational framework that matches the profile of different roles within community nursing teams. The module in particular will focus its attention on the many challenges facing practitioners today who work in this continuously changing yet challenging environment. The module addresses the recommendations put forward in recent policy documents Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 and the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. This module will follow the design and structure (as dictated by the All Wales working group for community nurse education) of the core community module in that there are 4 themes which form the underlying content of the module. The themes are as follows: 1. Community as the context of care; 2. Professional Role and Accountability; 3. Clinical Practice in the Community; 4. The Family.

  • SHGM09 Working in Community and Primary Mental Health Care Practice

    This module provides students with the opportunity to examine and develop the core values, knowledge and skills associated with the provision of safe, effective and collaborative mental health care in the community. By the end of the module students will have knowledge of the formal and informal resources available to people living with mental health problems in the community, and will recognise the importance of promoting partnerships with service users in meeting needs. Students will be supported to develop their capabilities in assessment, care provision and coordination and decision-making, with due regard to the available evidence, and will have knowledge of relevant policy and law related to community mental health practice.

  • SHGM10 Working with Individuals, Families & Communities in Primary Health Care Practice

    The module is designed to develop the knowledge and skills of practitioners in community and primary health practice. This will require that practitioners have an understanding of the underpinning concepts and approaches to primary health practice and the role of public health. Collaborative ways of working between sectors will be explored within the above context in order that students can plan and evaluate strategies for the improvement of health of individuals, groups and local populations. They will develop skills to work with others to plan, implement and evaluate programmes and projects, as well as appraising policies to recommend changes to improve health and well-being

  • SHHM15 Data Collection Methods

    This module aims to provide students with an overview of the range of data collection methods available to individuals undertaking research and to enable the student to consider the implications, application strengths and weaknesses of the various data collection methods. The module will also provide insight into the ways that such methods may be applied effectively and ethically in social research.

  • SHHM34 Case Studies in Applied Social Research: Social Work

    The module examines key issues in research on social work and social care by presenting a series of case studies illustrating various research methods applied in these areas.

  • SHN3042 Research and Development in Community Nursing Practice

    This core module builds on students¿ previous knowledge of research and aims to further develop their knowledge and understanding of the research process to include an appreciation of how practice and research are interrelated and its application to community nursing practice. There is an emphasis on 'action learning' approaches - which means that students are encouraged to read, notice and reflect on their practice and knowledge development and share their progress/difficulties in an educative, supportive and challenging arena (with other students, teachers, lecturers and practice teachers).

  • SHN3051 Research and Development in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) Practice

    This core module builds on students¿ previous knowledge of research and aims to expand their knowledge and understanding of the research process to include an appreciation of how practice and research are interrelated and its application to community nursing practice. There is an emphasis on 'action learning' approaches - which means that students are encouraged to read, notice and reflect on their practice and knowledge development and share their progress/difficulties in an educative, supportive and challenging arena (with other students, teachers, lecturers and practice teachers).

Supervision

  • 'Assessing the Implementing of Evidence based Practices in Mental Health' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Damon Berridge
  • Promoting emotional well-being in secondary schools in Wales (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Sherrill Snelgrove
  • Access to mental health services: in pursuit of shared values. (current)

    Student name:
    DProf
    Other supervisor: Dr Sherrill Snelgrove
  • Understanding and improving the mental well-being of older adults in residential care. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Charles Musselwhite
  • An ethnographic study of emotion work in emergency pre-hospital care (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof David Hughes
  • A Realist Evaluation of Gellinudd Recovery Centre, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and a Physical Health Education Intervention. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeanette Hewitt
    Other supervisor: Dr Liv Kosnes
    Other supervisor: Prof Jaynie Rance
  • An Examination of the Experience of Ecotherapy as an Intervention for Mental Health in Wales. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeanette Hewitt
    Other supervisor: Dr Michael Ward
  • Experiences of care continuity and recovery outcomes for people at the interface of primary and secondary care in Wales (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Deborah Fitzsimmons
  • Exploring participants' talk about mental health nursing tin the context of service user involvement. (awarded 2018)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeanette Hewitt

Key Grants and Projects

Research Groups

  • Service Delivery and Organisation research development group

    A group concerned with researching, and improving, the organisation and delivery of services. Members include people with personal experience of using services, academics, practitioners and managers, and people who work in universities, in the NHS, in campaigning and third sector organisations and in independent capacities.