Dr Paddy McQueen
Senior Lecturer
Political and Cultural Studies
Room: Office - 029
Ground Floor
James Callaghan
Singleton Campus

My main areas of research are in ethics, political theory and social philosophy. I am especially interested in the construction of identities and how they shape human behaviour and well-being. I have written on topics including the politics of recognition, feminism and gender theory, freedom, medical ethics, regret and transformative experiences.  My current areas of interest include relational autonomy, republicanism and the ethics of procreation and the politics of the family.

Areas of Expertise

  • Ethics
  • Social philosophy
  • Political theory

Publications

  1. The Role of Regret in Medical Decision-making. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20(5), 1051-1065.
  2. Choosing to be changed: Revelation, identity and the ethics of self-transformation. Ethical Perspectives 24(4), 545-568.
  3. When Should we Regret?. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25(5), 608-623.
  4. Autonomy, age and sterilisation requests. Journal of Medical Ethics 43(5), 310-313.
  5. Post-identity politics and the social weightlessness of radical gender theory. Thesis Eleven 134(1), 73-88.

See more...

Teaching

  • HUP201 Fundamental Issues in Moral and Political Philosophy

    In this module, we shall examine some fundamental issues in moral and political philosophy, including the nature of ethics, the scope and limits of moral reasoning, the relation between meta-ethical reflection and common-sense morality, the applicability of moral theory to practical life, the nature of justice, the foundation of rights, justifications for coercive paternalism, and the relation between politics and religion.

  • HUP304 Philosophy and the Social Sciences

    The module introduce students to a series of philosophical questions and difficulties connected with the explanation of human agency, both individual and collective. Issues to be discussed include the relation between the natural and the social sciences, the understanding of `primitive¿ societies¿, the psychopathology of evil, and the role of language in understanding social institutions.

  • PO-2001 Fundamental Issues in Moral and Political Philosophy

    In this module, we shall examine some fundamental issues in moral and political philosophy, including the nature of ethics, the scope and limits of moral reasoning, the relation between meta-ethical reflection and common-sense morality, the applicability of moral theory to practical life, the nature of justice, the foundation of rights, justifications for coercive paternalism, and the relation between politics and religion.

  • PO-3004 Philosophy and the Social Sciences

    The module introduce students to a series of philosophical questions and difficulties connected with the explanation of human agency, both individual and collective. Issues to be discussed include the relation between the natural and the social sciences, the understanding of `primitive¿ societies¿, the psychopathology of evil, and the role of language in understanding social institutions.

  • PO-395 Dissertation (PO-325)

    Subject to the approval of the Departmental Dissertations Tutor, students will choose their own area for research. They will be given guidance on research skills and techniques and supervised by a specialist research topic supervisor during the research for, and writing of, their dissertation. Dissertation word length - 8000 words.

  • PO-397 Researching Politics 2

    This module offers students a valuable experience of both individual and collective research - as well as the opportunity to study in depth an important aspect of Politics and International Relations. Students extend and deepen the research undertaken in PO-396 Researching Politics 1 and continue to meet regularly in order to share ideas, opinions and sources. In these meetings, students evaluate, criticise and analyse issues concerning the topic under investigation. Minutes of the meetings are kept and the meetings are conducted with a view to arriving at a common position that will serve as the basis for producing a collectively authored report and presentation. Each student in the group also produces a shorter individual report on their own experience of Researching Politics, in the course of which they reflect on their individual contribution to the groups output. This self-assessment is validated by the other members of the group.

  • PO-M25 Dissertation

    Individual research based, under the guidance of appointed supervisor.

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Programme Director - Philosophy

    2018 - Present

Career History

Start Date End Date Position Held Location
2017 2018 Lecturer in Political Theory Queen’s University Belfast
2015 2017 GOI Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow University College Dublin