Philip Murphy is a Professor of Economics in the Labour Economics Section in the School of Management at Swansea University. Before joining Swansea University in 1991, Professor Murphy held academic positions at the universities of Manchester, East Anglia, Aberdeen and IUPUI (USA).

He is an applied labour economist whose research interests span a number of areas including wage inequality the economics of discrimination, training, economic inactivity, spatial modelling, the dynamics of the national minimum wage, and the determinants of subjective wellbeing.

He has worked for the ESRC as an assessor of small grant proposals and between 2006/09 as an assessor for the ESRC’s open student grant competition.

He is currently a member of the Steering Group for the Committee of Heads of UK Departments of Economics (CHUDE), an associate member of the Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC), a member of the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD), and a member of the Executive Group of the Public Policy Institute for Wales (PPIW).

Professor Murphy has acted as special advisor to the Welsh Government on the Standard Spending Assessment, and along with colleagues at Swansea has completed numerous reports for government departments and public agencies that have contributed both to public policy debates and to policy design. He is currently the principle investigator on an ESRC sponsored research project examining “The Labour Market Implications of Changes in the Public Sector: Inequality and Work”, and has in the past few years been involved in research grant capture in excess of £11m.

Professor Murphy is currently supervising several research students and would welcome applications from prospective PhD students in any of the research areas identified above.

Supervision

  • 'Three essays on investment and growth' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jonathan James
    Other supervisor: Dr Rosen Chowdhury
  • The thesis aims to investigate several issues connected to entrepreneurship and self-employment amongst ethnic minorities in the UK. This is likely to include variations in self-employment intentions, rates and success by ethnic group and according to different characteristics. A possible chapter plan could look as follows: Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Literature Review Chapter 3: Ethnic Differences in Intentions to Become an Entrepreneur Chapter 4: Ethnic Variations in Self-Employment Chapter 5: Relative Differences in Success in Self-Employment by Ethnic Group Chapter 6: Conclusion (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Nigel O'Leary
    Other supervisor: Dr John Moffat
    Other supervisor: Prof David Blackaby
  • An Investigation into the Impact of Disability on Employment in the UK (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof David Blackaby
  • Public/Private Sector Wage Differentials in the UK (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof David Blackaby
  • An investigation of the socio-economic relationship between measures of civil society and social cohesion on subjective measures of individual wellbeing: a spatial analysis (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof David Blackaby
    Other supervisor: Prof Nigel O'Leary
  • Subjective wellbeing (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Nigel O'Leary
    Other supervisor: Prof David Blackaby