I studied for my BSc in Biomedical Science at Bangor University, and become a HCPC-registered Biomedical Scientist in 2010. Further to this, I completed my PhD in the field of Cancer Research at Bangor University, investigating molecular mechanisms of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Using the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe,my research focussed on elucidating the roles of novel variants of the S-phase effector kinase, Cds1Chk2. During this time I also lectured on the Biomedical Science and Medical Science BSc degree programmes at Bangor University, and successfully achieved Fellow status with the Higher Education Academy.

In 2016 I moved to Swansea University Medical School and began my position as a Lecturer and Deputy Admissions Tutor for the Applied Medical Sciences and Applied Medical Sciences with Foundation Year BSc degree programmes. In my teaching and learning practice, I have a particular interest in the use of digital media in education, and science communication. I am part of the SUMS Athena SWAN group, the organisation team for Soapbox Science, and I am a board member for Oriel Science

Teaching

  • PM-001 Metabolism and Homeostasis

    The module will provide the student with a broad overview of dietary requirements, digestion processes and associated anatomy, nutrient uptake and energetic metabolism processes within the human body. The catabolism of biomolecules for energy production will be covered and the role of the kidney in removal of by-products. The role of neuronal and hormonal systems in homeostatic control of the body will also be elaborated.

  • PM-008 Foundation Applied Medical Sciences Skills Development 2

    The module will provide the student with a diversity of laboratory and scientific skills in relation to the undertaking of undergraduate practical sessions in a safe manner and develop skills including molarity calculations, biological extractions, basic chromatography, an introduction into anatomical dissection and physiology.

  • PM-139 Human Physiology I

    This module aims to provide an understanding of the structure and function of key physiological systems of the human body. Human physiology is the study of how our body works in an integrated way. A central principle of human physiology is homeostasis, the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment. Failure to maintain homeostasis disrupts normal function that may lead to disease (or pathophysiology). Students will be taught the key concepts of homeostasis in the physiological systems of the body, enabling the student to understand the consequences of pathophysiology to human health. Students will gain practical experience in assessing respiration and cardiac function during two separate laboratory based exercises

  • PM-140 Anatomy

    This module will provide knowledge of the structure of the human body, and how this adult anatomy develops. It will study human anatomy in a systems approach, focusing on the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, urogenital, and nervous systems. Anatomy is a fundamental science and supports many areas of biology. As such the topics chosen for this module are those most useful to other areas of biological science, and are often clinically significant. This module will use practical classes to study human tissue and will develop the skills needed to dissect and study cadavers. Support materials and laboratory space for self directed learning will be available, including plastic anatomical models, bones and skeletons, and computer based anatomical models.

  • PM-141 Human Physiology II

    This module aims to provide students with further understanding of human physiology through studies on systems physiology including the endocrine, renal, blood, digestive/metabolism and reproductive system. The module will equally describe how malfunction of physiological systems gives rise to disease, using specific examples to enable students to appreciate the relationship between physiology/anatomy and medicine. Fundamental principles of physiology will be illustrated with appropriate clinical examples and during practical assignments.

  • PM-256 Communicating Medical Sciences

    An important aspect of the role of scientists concerns the communication of complex scientific ideas and research to non-specialist audiences. This module will explore methods of science communication including public events and campaigns and through digital and social media. There will be a focus on visual communication techniques (such as digital storytelling and infographics) to facilitate engagement and presentation of information for different audiences. Students will be required to deliver a short presentation, create a poster, write an abstract, and write and deliver a podcast (digital audio file).