About Me

Professor Phil Reed obtained a D.Phil. from the University of York, and then held a Research Fellowship at the University of Oxford, and a Readership in Learning and Behaviour at University College London. He took a Chair in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University.

Phil's research interests fall into three broad categories: Learning and Memory, Autism and Educational Interventions, and Psychology and Medicine including Internet Addiction. Phil has written four books, and published over 200 papers on these and other topics, as well as being invited to present his work at international conferences. Phil has served on the Editorial Boards for Behavior and Philosophy, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Phil’s work on internet addiction and autism features regularly on the media, and has been featured on the Science Channel’s ‘Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman’, BBC Radio 4, and Radio Wales, as well as in Time Magazine, Cosmopolitan, The Daily Mail, and also locally in the Swansea Evening Post and the Western Mail.

Phil works closely with many educational charities and local education authorities to advise about autism and reading problems, and has held appointments for the Department for Education, and the Children in Wales Policy Council in these contexts. Phil has held grants from the Baily Thomas Fund, Economic and Social Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, and Mechner Foundation.

Publications

  1. The structure of random ratio responding in humans.. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition 41(4), 419-431.
  2. & Evidence for an internet addiction disorder: Internet exposure reinforces color preference in withdrawn problem users. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 77,269–274. 77(2), 269-274.
  3. Procedure for preventing response strain on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop. Learning and Behavior 44(1), 78-84.
  4. Rats Show Molar Sensitivity to Different Aspects of Random-Interval-With-Linear-Feedback-Functions and Random-Ratio Schedules.. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition 41(4), 432-443.
  5. & Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function. PLOS ONE 10(8), e0134538

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Teaching

  • PS-318 Dissertation

    This optional module provides students with the opportunity to conduct an extended literature review to discover what is currently known about an interesting, but less well known, area of psychology that is not taught as part of the psychology curriculum in Level 2 or 3. Students work independently, guided by their dissertation supervisor, to research a topic of their choice. In recent years students have written dissertations about political psychology, why people take part in extreme sports, is obesity caused by food addiction, does smoking cannabis cause schizophrenia and many other diverse questions.

  • PS-M10 Dissertation (MSc Research Methods)

    This module involves practical application of the skills acquired in Part I of the MSc Research Methods, and is a culmination of the teaching given in Part I of the programme. Students must identify a research supervisor from within the Department and agree an independent research project proposal to be conducted from TB2 onwards. Students will be required to design, execute, analyse and report a research project of their own choosing drawing on their own interests, under the supervision of an appropriate member of staff.

  • PS-M14 Philosophy of Psychology

    This module gives an overview both of the assumptions underlying Psychology, and of the major questions addressed by psychologists. Areas from the Philosophy of Science, such as positivism, reductionism, falsificationism, and the sociology of knowledge will be addressed. The course focuses on recent debates concerning the Philosophy of Mind, the relationship between behaviourism, neuroscience and Psychology, and on methodological issues such as the nature of scientific method and its alternatives.

  • PS-M16 Statistical Methods

    This module provides coverage of statistical analysis via a practical/conceptual rather than a theoretical approach. Instruction is given in the use of computer statistical package. The objective of this approach is to ensure competency in the understanding of measurement theory, and the performance of nonparametric statistics for hypothesis testing. The course will lead to the ability to perform analysis of variance, and advanced multivariate statistical analysis through a computer package, and enable interpretation of such statistics.

  • PS-M52 Statistical and Research Methods

    This module provides a comprehensive overview of the statistical methods and research designs used in applied clinical and health psychology. The module examines the parameters of ethical research practice and introduces students to the key concepts and a limited number of qualitative methods commonly used in applied psychology.

  • PS-M57 Applied Behaviour Analysis

    This module outlines the major principles and applications of behavioural psychology. It covers the basic concepts underlying the approach to psychology, and covers contemporary developments in the field, and their applications in a clinical and educational context. In also covers the principles of functional assessment and analysis. Many of the applied examples given regarding behavioural intervention are concerned with Autism Spectrum Disorders, and other developmental disorders, but other examples drawn from adult fields are also given. The core components of empirically-validated interventions are emphasised.

  • PSA319 Final Year Independent Research Project

    Students conduct an independent research project under the supervision of a member of staff. Students must obtain ethical approval, design, conduct, analyse and write up a piece of research in order to achieve Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society.

  • PSY214 From Individuals to Society

    This module focuses on the study of individuals both in terms of how individuals differ from each other (such as personality traits and attributional style) as well as how environmental factors such as ethnocentrism, group performance and pro-social behaviour affect behaviour. Classical and contemporary theory and research relevant to a range of social psychological issues such as leadership and stress are covered. Social psychology content is structured under the broad thematic umbrellas of intra-personal (individual-level) and inter-personal (group-level) processes. The module also encompasses individual differences from the perspective of abnormal variation (e.g. psychological problems including autistic spectrum disorders) and normal variation (behavioural genetics, personality and intelligence). Key questions such as ‘What do we mean by normal behaviour?’ and ‘What is the relative contribution of nature vs. nurture to individual differences?’ are addressed.

Supervision

  • Memory in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Toby Lloyd-Jones
  • The structure of Human Performance on Schedules of reinforcement (current)

    Student name:
    MPhil
    Other supervisor: Dr Simon Dymond
  • Human performance on schedules of reinforcement (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Vicky Lovett
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Vicky Lovett
  • An evaluation of reading assessments for pupils with Autism Spectrum Disorder (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeremy Tree
  • Discrimination processes in dyslexia (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeremy Tree
  • The efficacy of the outcomes of ABA and Intensive Interaction on individuals diagnosed with ASD, also the impact of these interventions on the family well beings. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Toby Lloyd-Jones
  • Separation of diagnosis of Autism and Attachment disorders (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Paul Bennett
  • An Examination of Deception as a Conditioned Stimulus (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Miss Louise Mchugh
  • Measuring and Remediating Avoidance and Rigid Rule-Following in Sub-clinical Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Miss Louise Mchugh
  • Processes and Mechanisms of Stimulus Over-selectivity (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Miss Louise Mchugh
  • The Influence of the Unusual Experiences Dimension of Schizotypy on Timing Within a Reinforcement Schedules and Explicit Timing Judgements Context (awarded 2011)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jo Saunders
  • The Mechanisms Underlying the Transfer of Functions after Evaluative Learning (awarded 2010)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Miss Louise Mchugh
  • Emotion-based Learning: An Experimental and Clinical Investigation (awarded 2010)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Simon Dymond
  • The effectiveness of different intervention programmes for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (awarded 2010)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jo Saunders
  • Tacting private events: An investigation into the social emotional experience of children with autism spectrum disorders (awarded 2008)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Simon Dymond
  • Factors promoting school success and inclusion of children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (awarded 2007)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Simon Dymond
  • The Use of Behavioural Interventions in Combating Over-selectivity in a Population with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (awarded 2007)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Miss Louise Mchugh
  • Cognitive Predictors of Source Monitoring in Pre-School Children: Theory of Mind, Executive Function and Language (awarded 2007)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Ruth Ford
  • An exploration of the employment experiences, needs and aspirations among unemployed men receiving mental health support in the South Wales Valleys. (awarded 2005)

    Student name:
    MPhil
    Other supervisor: Dr Mark Cook
  • Untitled (awarded 2005)

    Student name:
    MPhil
    Other supervisor: Professor Michelle Lee
  • The ICE Model of Drug Use: Development of an Identity-Based Theory of Substance-Using Behaviour (awarded 2005)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Clark