Engineering a difference since 1920

From the development of the Finite Element Method at Swansea in the 1960s to our present day research turning buildings into power stations, we strive for our research to have a real impact.

Take a look at our research in action: find out how we have been engineering a difference.

Finite Element Method

Finite Element Method

Our pioneering of the Finite Element Method is recognised as one of the top 100 discoveries and developments in UK universities to have changed the world.

The Finite Element Method developed at Swansea University by Professor Olek Zienkiewicz in 1967 has enabled us to take a lead in computational modelling techniques that allow engineers to design ever more challenged structures and processes, with the minimal use of expensive experimental testing.

Find out how our leading computational research work has made a profound impact on the solution of industrial problems.

Definitive text book

Coulson and Richardson's Chemical Engineering

Professor J F (Jack) Richardson led chemical engineering at Swansea University from 1960 to 1987. His most enduring achievement was being the co-author and editor of the comprehensive textbooks Coulson and Richardson's Chemical Engineering.

This standard textbook is used for teaching chemical engineers worldwide and for over 50 years has been translated into many languages. It is still the most comprehensive work of its kind.

CFD

BLOODHOUND SSC

Our expertise in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is seen in systems such as the FLITE software used by BAE Systems and Airbus.

The design of the world land speed record beating THRUST SSC was informed by our research in CFD. Due to the success of the last car breaking the sound barrier, our expertise has been called upon to design the aerodynamics for the BLOODHOUND SSC.

Find out how we improved the aerodynamic design process for the aerospace industry, through FLITE, a computational aerodynamics system.

The future

Baglan Bay Innovation Centre

We are excited about the future of our engineering research.

To find out what we are doing now, take a look at:

- Our world-class strategic technology centres

- Our thematic research centres and groups

- Our current research areas and projects