Originally an anthropologist, Dr Cave is interested in social worlds and alternative economies. Prior to becoming an academic in 2001, she enjoyed a 20-year career in consultancy, senior management and governance roles in the cultural/events industries and science communication in Canada and New Zealand. Dr Cave worked in third sector, private and public (federal and local governments) sector organisations at national, regional and local levels. She is a weaver, with an enduring love of heritage, culture, design and the arts.

Her research agenda explores the long-term transformative power of co-creative sustainable development in tourism, from a critical lens and Global South perspective. Current themes are the meaning of work, precarity, wellbeing and inclusion, symbiosis, diasporan care-cycles, ‘politeness’ of border police, inclusivity and intersectionality, alternative economies, the politics of partnership and experiential pedagogy. Her teaching has spanned event management, hospitality, tourism management, adventure tourism, research methods and entrepreneurship.

Dr Cave holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Anthropology from Otago University, New Zealand (specialising in zoo-archaeology; use-wear analysis); Masters of Museum Studies from the University of Toronto (audience advocacy); PhD in Tourism Management (2009) from the University of Waikato, New Zealand (Pacific Island migrant nascent entrepreneurs).

Areas of Expertise

  • Tourism
  • Community engagement
  • Sustainable development
  • Enterprise
  • Alternative economies
  • Social worlds
  • Diaspora

Publications

  1. & Short-Term Visits and Tongan Livelihoods: Enterprise and Transnational Exchange. Population, Space and Place 21(7), 669-688.
  2. & Tourism border-making: A political economy of China's border tourism. Annals of Tourism Research 76, 1-13.
  3. & Chinese rural tourism development: Transition in the case of Qiyunshan, Anhui. – 2008–2015. Tourism Management 55, 240-260.
  4. & Residents, their use of a tourist facility and contribution to tourist ambience: Narratives from a film tourism site in Beijing. Tourism Management 52, 416-429.
  5. & Souvenir sellers and perceptions of authenticity – The retailers of Hội An, Vietnam. Tourism Management 45, 275-283.

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Teaching

  • MN-3000 Final Year Project

    This module serves as the capstone course for the BSc Business Management programme. The module allows students to undertake in-depth and applied research on an academic or practical topic of their choosing.

  • MN-3012 Marketing Research

    The Marketing Research course examines both the theoretical and practical sides of the marketing research process. Overall, the module is designed to equip participants with the knowledge to be able to design and implement theoretically sound marketing research projects in a commercial environment.