Brian Varian is a Lecturer in Economics at Swansea University. In 2017, he received a PhD in Economic History from the London School of Economics for a dissertation which examined British exports in the late nineteenth century. He earned his MSc from the London School of Economics and BS from Boston College in the United States.

Brian's interests are in economic history and international trade. His research has been published in the Economic History Review and the Australian Economic History Review. He is a trustee of the Economic History Society. Brian is willing to supervise PhD students writing dissertations in the field of economic history.

More details of Brian's research can be found on his website: https://sites.google.com/site/briandvarian/

Areas of Expertise

  • Economic history
  • International trade

Publications

  1. (in press). Book review of Daniel Peart, Lobbyists and the Making of US Tariff Policy, 1816-1861 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018. pp. viii+326. 46 tabs. ISBN Hbk. 9781421426112 Hbk. $69.95). (Economic History Review).
  2. The growth of manufacturing protection in 1920s Britain. Scottish Journal of Political Economy
  3. Anglo-American trade costs during the first era of globalization: the contribution of a bilateral tariff series†. The Economic History Review 71(1), 190-212.
  4. British capital and merchandise exports, 1870-1913: the bilateral case of New Zealand. Australian Economic History Review 57(2), 239-262.

Teaching

  • MN-1011 Micro-economics 1

    This module provides a rigorous understanding of basic micro-economic principles by combining theory and application to contemporary issues, such that students have a sound basis for progression to study economics at Level 2.

  • MN-2530 Economic Policy

    The module is designed to give students the opportunity to apply their knowledge of economic principles to the formulation and critique of important areas of economic policy. As part of this aim, it is designed to encompass microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis of both the historical and contemporary economy.

Supervision

  • Essays in International Trade (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Nigel O'Leary