Dr Pyrs Gruffudd
Associate Professor
Geography
Telephone: (01792) 295146
Room: Academic Office - 244
Second Floor
Wallace Building
Singleton Campus

Publications

  1. Linehan, D., Gruffudd, P. Bodies and souls: psycho-geographical collisions in the South Wales coalfield, 1926–1939 Journal of Historical Geography 27 3 377 394
  2. Gruffudd, P. «Science and the stuff of life»: modernist health centres in 1930s London Journal of Historical Geography 27 3 395 416
  3. Linehan, D., Gruffudd, P. Unruly topographies: unemployment, citizenship and land settlement in inter-war Wales Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 29 1 46 63
  4. Gruffudd, P. The Battle of Butlin's: Vulgarity and Virtue on the North Wales Coast, 1939–49 Rural History 21 01 75
  5. Charles, N., Carter, B., Gruffudd, P. On the Prowl with the Possum Posse: Nature and Nation in Aotearoa / New Zealand (Ed.), 217 Palgrave Macmillan

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Teaching

  • GEC333 Ffiniau Ymchwil Daearyddol

    Mae'r modiwl yma yn yn rhoi cyfle i fyfyrwyr i ddangos eu cymhwysedd fel Daearyddwyr drwy gyflawni dadansoddiad beirniadol o amrywiaeth o ffynonellau llenyddol. Er bod y traethawd hir fel arfer yn canolbwyntio ar ddylunio a chyflawni prosiect ymchwil sy'n seiliedig ar gasglu, dadnsoddi a dehongli data, mae'r modiwl yma yn canolbwyntio ar ymgysylltu a llenyddiaeth academaidd ar y ffin o un agwedd o Ddaearyddiaeth. Gall myfyrwyr ddewis o ystod eang o ffiniau ymchwil o fewn Dearyddiaeth Dynol a Ffisegol sydd wedi eu dewis o flaen llaw gan staff academaidd yr adran. Gan bod y modiwl yma yn ffocysi ar arddull o ddysgu "myfyriwr-canolog" (student centered), ni fydd y ffinau wedi eu trafod mewn unrhyw fanylder o fmewn modiwlau blaenorol, er efallai bydd rhai modiwlau wedi cyflwyno'r ffiniau. Bydd yna gyflwyniad fyr i bob ffin ac rhestr fyr o gyfeiriadau pwysig ar Blackboard / Porth. Nodwch: rhaid i'r testun a ddewisir beidio a gorgyffwrdd gyda'r testun Traethawd Hir. Os oes unrhyw amheuaeth, yna rhaid i chi drafod gyda'ch Tiwtor Cefnogaeth Traethawd Hir ac bydd angen i chi dderbyn cytundeb ysgrifenedig. This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)

  • GEG131 Cities

    Cities have captured the cultural imagination for centuries as blueprints of possible future lives, but they are also the places of the most pressing social struggles of our time. This module will introduce you to these issues by examining both urbanization - the process of city-making - and the various ways that Geographers study that process.

  • GEG252 Geographical Fieldwork skills

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions within a specific field location and applying the relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. The general aims are to observe, analyse and achieve an understanding of the varied geographical landscapes and inherent features of a designated fieldweek location. The module comprises a week's fieldwork at a designated, normally foreign, location and preparatory and post-fieldweek lectures and other classes.

  • GEG268 Dissertation Preparation

    The module prepares students for their independent research dissertation through dissertation fairs, lectures and a series of tutorials focusing upon the formulation and construction of a research proposal. The module also includes three lectures which explore career opportunities for Geography graduates and skills to enhance graduate employability.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG332 Dissertation Support: Geography

    This module provides structured, student-led peer-group support and academic staff group supervision for students undertaking the 30-credit 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module. This support and supervision is assessed through the submission of a PowerPoint Poster in TB1 and the submission in TB2 of an individually composed, critical and reflective log of the 5 dissertation peer-group meetings and the 4 group supervisory meetings (with a verified record of attendance at meetings). Working within a supervised Student Peer Group, you will also have the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This module complements the 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG333 Geographical Research Frontiers

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)

  • GEG342 Geographies of National Identity

    This module examines the way in which landscape has been viewed as a resource by those seeking to promote (or to criticise) ideas of nationhood, patriotism and nation-building. It examines the intersection of political and sociological ideas of the nation with the fundamentally geographical concerns of landscape, nature, sense of place, and territory as well as with issues of class, race, language and gender, for example. The module takes an historical and cultural approach to these issues, concentrating on the Western world and extending from around 1800 to the present day. It examines natural and built landscapes as well as representations in the arts. In addition to historical and geographical texts, therefore, this module draws on a wide range of sources including painting, architecture, literature and film, although it assumes no previous familiarity with such sources.

Supervision

  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Keith Halfacree
  • The role of Permaculture Projects in creating more resilient communities. (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Keith Halfacree
  • From Fable to Table in Human-animal Relations: Case studies in Swedish primary education (awarded 2018)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Keith Halfacree