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Staff Profile Main Details

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Publications

  1. Origin and significance of soft-sediment deformation in the Old Red Sandstone of central South Wales, UK. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association 128(3), 422-430.
  2. & Snow-avalanche impact craters in southern Norway: Their morphology and dynamics compared with small terrestrial meteorite craters. Geomorphology 296, 11-30.
  3. & Landscape evolution of Lundy Island: challenging the proposed MIS 3 glaciation of SW Britain. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association 128(5-6), 722-741.
  4. Engaging the public with geoscience through ‘virtual guided walks’. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association 127, 633-644.
  5. Leaflets aim to draw geo-walkers to paths less trodden. Earth Heritage 46(Summer 2016), 30-31.

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Teaching

  • GEG252V Geographical Fieldwork skills: Vancouver

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions within the Vancouver and southern British Columbia context and applying relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. The general aims are to observe, analyse and achieve an understanding of the varied geographical landscape and inherent features of Vancouver and southern British Columbia. Students taking this module will gain experience in research design, methodologies, data analysis and presentation methods, including seminars, posters and reports. Students taking this field course focus on either the physical or human geography on the region and conduct project work appropriate to their specialism. The module comprises preparatory lectures in Swansea during teaching block 2 and a two-week field course, which typically runs in the last week of teaching block 2 into the first week of the Easter vacation.

Supervision

  • We're still working on a final title (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Prof Mary Gagen