Teaching

  • GE-005 Geography Tutorial and Skills Module

    The Geography tutorial programme endeavors to foster students' capacity for independent learning and research in geography.

  • GE-007 Foundation Physical and Environmental Geography

    This module complements topics taught in the Foundation Human Geography module (GE-008), to give an understanding of physical geography and the environment. The module considers the impacts of physical geography processes on human habitation, and how humans might mitigate against the effects of nature's extreme events. It also examines the complex issues surrounding human impacts on the landscape. Foundation Physical & Environmental Geography will pave the way for students to study Geography at Level 4 (Year 1).

  • GE-008 Foundation Human Geography.

    An introduction to human geography concepts and themes from the perspective of contemporary research. The material covered builds on the A2 syllabus and focuses on the areas of development, globalisation and sustainability. Development is a continuing concern of geographers while the economic, political, social and environmental aspects of Globalisation increasingly impact on people and places. Themes relating to Sustainability (Sustainable Water, Sustainable Energy, Sustainable Population and Sustainable Cities) draw attention to the complexities and the management of a sustainable planet.

  • GEG252V Geographical Fieldwork skills: Vancouver

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions within the Vancouver and southern British Columbia context and applying relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. The general aims are to observe, analyse and achieve an understanding of the varied geographical landscape and inherent features of Vancouver and southern British Columbia. Students taking this module will gain experience in research design, methodologies, data analysis and presentation methods, including seminars, posters and reports. Students taking this field course focus on either the physical or human geography on the region and conduct project work appropriate to their specialism. The module comprises preparatory lectures in Swansea during teaching block 2 and a two-week field course, which typically runs in the last week of teaching block 2 into the first week of the Easter vacation.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG333 Geographical Research Frontiers

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)