Professor Jane Williams
Professor
Legal Studies
Telephone: (01792) 295815
Room: Office - 153
First Floor
Richard Price Building
Singleton Campus

Publications

  1. England and Wales. In Liefaard, T. and Doek, J. (Ed.), Litigating the Rights of the Child. Springer.
  2. & Framing Asymmetry: Devolution and the United Kingdom’s Four Children’s Commissioners. The International Journal of Children's Rights 24(2), 408-433.
  3. Incorporating children's rights: the divergence in law and policy. Legal Studies 27(2), 261-287.
  4. & (Eds.). The Human Rights of Children: From visions to implementation. Farnham: Ashgate.
  5. General legislative measures of implementation: individual claims, ‘public officer’s law’ and a case study on the UNCRC in Wales. The International Journal of Children's Rights 20(2), 224-240.

See more...

Teaching

  • LA-368 Public Law for Graduate Diploma in Law regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar

    Conversion course for non law graduates to fulfill academic requirements of professional bodies and enable progression to those wishing to become solicitors or barristers.

  • LA-M10 Advanced Drafting

    This course is designed for qualified solicitors or barristers who wish to improve their legal drafting skills.

  • LAA322 Research with children

    This module explores the concept of the 'right to be properly researched', with application to children. It introduces the student to rights-based research methodology derived from international human rights law, especially the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Students will learn about approaches to children's developmental capacity and competence which are pertinent not only to research with children but also to case work involving children. Students will learn about different research methods for a. engaging with children in adult-led research; b. child and young person-led research; and c. age-inclusive co-production of research. Students will explore different pathways to impact of research involving children and young people, including through influence on law reform, impactful publications, policy advocacy, human rights treaty monitoring and strategic litigation.

  • LAA368 Street Law

    Street Law is a free legal education programme delivered to schools or community groups. It empowers people by informing them about the law, legal system and human rights in a democratic society. This module enables students to develop and deliver a Street Law session on a selected topic. Students will be supported to select a human rights-related legal topic, conduct legal research and prepare a session suitable to the selected audience. Through a mixture of whole group workshops, supervision of their individual and team project work and through delivery and evaluation of their session, students will gain skills and confidence in communicating complex areas of law in ways which are accessible to members of the public. They will gain understanding of why law is sometime perceived negatively and about barriers to access to justice. They will develop strategies for challenging negative perceptions of law and human rights, building understanding and encouraging discussion. They will practise and improve their interpersonal skills (communication, negotiation, presentation, team-working, lawyering skills (client communication, public speaking, ability to explain the law to lay people), skills for service delivery (marketing and outreach, dealing with feedback and accountability) and will gain understanding of the legal needs of a particular client group and how to respond professionally.

  • LAAM13 Street Law

    Street Law is a free legal education programme delivered to schools or community groups. It empowers people by informing them about the law, legal system and human rights in a democratic society. This module enables students to develop and deliver a Street Law session on a selected topic. Students will be supported to select a human rights-related legal topic, conduct legal research and prepare a session suitable to the selected audience. Through a mixture of whole group workshops, supervision of their individual and team project work and through delivery and evaluation of their session, students will gain skills and confidence in communicating complex areas of law in ways which are accessible to members of the public. They will gain understanding of why law is sometimes perceived negatively and about barriers to access to justice. They will develop strategies for challenging negative perceptions of the law and human rights, building understanding and encouraging discussion. They will practise and improve their interpersonal skills (communication, negotiation, presentation, team-working, lawyering skills (client communication, public speaking, ability to explain the law to lay people), skills for service delivery (marketing and outreach, dealing with feedback and accountability) and will gain understanding of the legal needs of particular client group and how to respond professionally.

  • LAAM14 Research with children

    This module explores the concept of the 'right to be properly researched', with application to children. It introduces the student to rights-based research methodology derived from international human rights law, especially the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Students will learn about approaches to children's developmental capacity and competence which are pertinent not only to research with children but also to case work involving children. Students will learn about different research methods for a. engaging with children in adult-led research; b. child and young person-led research; and c. age inclusive co-production of research. Students will explore pathways to impact of research involving children and young people, including through influence on law reform, impactful publications, policy advocacy, human rights treaty monitoring and strategic litigation.

Supervision

  • [Working title] Developing Welsh Law to protect the liberty of the mentally ill«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /» (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Simon Hoffman
    Other supervisor: Dr Caroline Jones
    Other supervisor: Prof Jane Williams
  • Rights and Responsibilities: Do the safeguards contained in the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) successfully achieve their theoretical objectives when used to support adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who come into contact with police and the criminal justice system ?«br /»«br /» (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Anthony Charles
    Other supervisor: Prof Jane Williams
    Other supervisor: Prof Jane Williams
    Other supervisor: Dr Suzanne Edwards
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Jane Williams
    Other supervisor: Dr Monika Seisenberger
  • 'The Case for Special Protection for Older People in International Law' (awarded 2018)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Jane Williams
    Other supervisor: Dr Simon Hoffman