Dr Charlie Dunnill
Senior Lecturer
Engineering
Telephone: (01792) 606244
Room: Office - 211
Second Floor
Energy Safety Research Institute
Bay Campus

I work in the new Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) and have many interests in the field of energy.

Primarily my focus is in utilising Hydrogen as an energy vector for renewable energy.

I work with hydrogen production and management technology including photocatalytic materials that can be used for the generation of hydrogen and hydrogen detectors.

Areas of Expertise

  • Hydrogen
  • Photocatalysis

Publications

  1. & Powering the Hydrogen Economy from Waste Heat: A Review of Heat‐to‐Hydrogen Concepts. ChemSusChem
  2. & Raney Nickel 2.0: Development of a high-performance bifunctional electrocatalyst. Electrochimica Acta, 134687
  3. & Photocapacitive CdS/WOx nanostructures for solar energy storage. Scientific Reports 9(1)
  4. & Zero gap alkaline electrolysis cell design for renewable energy storage as hydrogen gas. RSC Advances 6(102), 100643-100651.
  5. & Hydrogen-enriched natural gas as a domestic fuel: An analysis based on flash-back and blow-off limits for domestic natural gas appliances within the UK. Sustainable Energy & Fuels

See more...

Teaching

  • EG-386 Engineering Management

    This module will develop skills relating to the management of financial and human resources within the engineering sector. With respect to financial resources, the course will introduce the practice of accounting for transactions within a new business so as to give the student a good appreciation of the balance sheet, profit & loss and cash flow statements, which are essential components of a business plan. The course will also show students how to interpret financial statements and how best to allocate financial resources between competing engineering projects. With respect to human resources, the course will cover the basic concept of entrepreneurship before breaking down the essential elements of a business plan. The course will give the more entrepreneurial students guidance about how to go about commercialising their ideas and the less entrepreneurial students an understanding of what makes some of their colleagues tick. The learn by example approach adopted for this module guides the student through the complexities of financial and human resource management and encourages students to develop their own business plans. Students will also be introduced to the subject area of ethics within business. This module will also provide support on careers services with students creating CVs and Linked-In accounts.

  • EGSM05 Engineering Technology, Innovation and Application

    This module will give students an overview of the role of engineering technology and innovation in society. By understanding the process of technological development, transfer, implementation and commercialisation for different economic and political settings, students will be able to critically evaluate and assess where and how technology could have a positive impact in the context given. Students will develop design concepts in response to a problem defined by industry, utilising appropriate engineering analysis methods and critically evaluate the success of the concept being developed. Students will also consider how technology could be effectively transferred to be managed by stakeholders and commercialisation in long-term strategic development.

  • EGSM13 Engineering in Development Practice

    This module will give introduction on how engineering fits within the development context. The module aims to develop students¿ understanding of the important factors which will play a role in the success of an engineering solution in a given context, and the myriad of the interdisciplinary skills required for effective delivery.

  • EGSM33 Appropriate Technologies (ELM Pathway)

    This module will give students an overview of the role of technology in society. By understanding the process of technological development, transfer, implementation and commercialisation for different economic and political settings, students will be able to critically evaluate and assess where and how technology could have a positive impact in the context given. Students will also consider how technology could be effectively transferred to be managed by stakeholders and commercialisation in long-term strategic development.

Supervision

  • Solar energy harvesting by photocatalytic biphasic water splitting catalysts (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • Development cold-wall chemical vapour deposition systems for the growth of carbon nanotubes (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Alvin Orbaek White
  • Development of a hydrogen fuel cell heat rejection model (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Alvin Orbaek White
  • Biphasic photocatalytic materials MoS2/WO3 for Solar energy harvesting and enhanced photocatalysis (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • Zero gap cell design for alkaline electrolysis (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • Advanced Electrocatalysts for Future Renewable Energy Storage as Hydrogen. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • Synthesis and Surface functionalisation of TiO2 nanoparticles - Development of versatile colloidal formulations for the fabrication of photocatalytic self-cleaning glass. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Cecile Charbonneau
  • Polyamine and MOF Sorbents for Enhanced Carbon Capture (awarded 2019)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Enrico Andreoli
  • MODELLING AND DESIGN OF PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS (awarded 2019)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Alvin Orbaek White
  • 'Development and Characterisation of an electrochemical cell for detection and extraction of Hydrogen' (awarded 2018)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrew Barron