I am lecturer in English Literature, specialising in both modern/contemporary Irish literature and William Shakespeare. My research is infused by interests in literary theory, particularly poststructuralism, and I seek to deconstruct theory as much as the literature I examine.

My monograph Shakespeare, memory and modern Irish literature is under contract with Manchester University Press (forthcoming, 2020). In the book I examine the remembered presence of Shakespeare in Irish writers including James Joyce, J. M. Synge, John Banville, Samuel Beckett, Edna O’Brien, W. B. Yeats and Seamus Heaney. My co-edited (with Dr Stanley van der Ziel) Shakespeare and Contemporary Irish Literature was released in 2018 (Palgrave Macmillan). I have published variously on Shakespeare, Joyce, John McGahern, Eavan Boland and Ciaran Carson.

For my next project I plan a focus on thanatology in the fiction of contemporary writer John Banville. I will use a set of poststructural frameworks to consider death as extreme as sociological fact and literary catalyst. I formally inaugurated this project in summer 2018 when I was a visiting lecturer to the W.B. Yeats Chair at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. In 2020, I will co-edit a special issue of the Brazilian Journal of Irish Studies (ABEI) on John Banville.

I teach across the English literature curriculum. In 2018-19 I have taught undergraduate and postgraduate modules on ‘Revolution of the Word: Modernism’, ‘James Joyce and Theory’, ‘Fragments of Union’, ‘Contentious Shakespeare’, ‘Monsters, Theories and Revolutions’, ‘Race and Ethnicity: American Perspectives’, ’The Stage Play World’, and ‘Contentious Shakespeare’. I have also supervised undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations. 

In 2018-19, I have also convened ’The Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize’ module, which took the Prize’s hyper-contemporary longlist as its reading list. Assessed through creative portfolios as well as traditional essays, the module additionally engaged students through blogs, and through workshops delivered by publishing-industry professionals, as well as via traditional seminars. Students were offered employability opportunities through Swansea’s Cultural Institute and the Swansea Employability Academy (SEA). As a result of the module, I have been contracted to author a Routledge guidebook Judge for Yourself: Reading Contemporary Literature and Book-Prize Shortlists (forthcoming, 2020) about how students can engage with writing so new that it has not yet gathered a critical consensus.

I am interested in supervising projects on:

  • John Banville’s fiction;
  • literature of the city;
  • Shakespeare and theory;

and on related issues.

Areas of Expertise

  • William Shakespeare
  • Modern Irish literature
  • Contemporary Irish literature
  • Literary theory
  • Early modern England

Publications

  1. Taylor-Collins, N. & Taylor-Collins, N. The City's Hostile Bodies: Coriolanus's Rome and Carson's Belfast. The Modern Language Review, 115(1), 17
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.115.1.0017
  2. Taylor-Collins, N. & van der Ziel, S. Palgrave Macmillan
  3. Taylor-Collins, N. Moving the Statue: Myths of Motherhood in Eavan Boland, Shakespeare and Early Modern Culture. Shakespeare and Contemporary Irish Literature (pp. 71-97). Palgrave Macmillan
  4. Taylor-Collins, N. & van der Ziel, S. Introduction: Shakespeare, Ireland and the Contemporary. (pp. 1-25). Palgrave Macmillan
  5. Taylor-Collins, N. (n.d.) “Remember me”: Hamlet, memory and Bloom’s poiesis. Irish Studies Review, 25(2), 241-258.
  6. Collins, N. & Taylor-Collins, N. 'This Prison Where I Live': Ireland Takes Centre Stage. Cahiers Élisabéthains: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies, 88(1), 125-138.
  7. Collins, N. & Taylor-Collins, N. “[L]ike a shoal of fish moving within a net”: 'King Lear' and McGahern’s Family in 'Amongst Women'. John McGahern: Critical Essays (pp. 113-136). Peter Lang
  8. Taylor-Collins, N. The Duke’s hospitable return in Measure for Measure. Notes and Queries, 65(4), 538-539.
  9. Taylor-Collins, N. & Taylor-Collins, N. The City's Hostile Bodies: Coriolanus's Rome and Carson's Belfast. The Modern Language Review, 115(1), 17
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.115.1.0017

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Year 1 Co-ordinator

    2017 - 2018

  • Admissions Officer

    2018 - 2019

  • Outreach Officer

    2019 - Present

Career History

Start Date End Date Position Held Location
2012 2015 Part-time tutor Department of English & CLS, University of Warwick
2015 2017 Postdoctoral Associate Tutor Department of English & CLS, University of Warwick

Research Groups

  • MEMO

    Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research