Dr Troy Sagrillo
Senior Lecturer
Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology
Telephone: (01792) 513538
Room: Office - 213
Second Floor
James Callaghan
Singleton Campus

Dr. Troy Leiland Sagrillo is a Senior Lecturer in Egyptology in the Department of History and Classics.

He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in Illustration and Graphic Design at the Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, and regularly uses his design skills as an epigrapher and archæological illustrator on archæological missions in Egypt. He completed a Master of Arts (MA) degree in Syro-Palestinian Archæology in the Department of Near Eastern Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson. His Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Egyptology was begun in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto, and was completed in the Faculteit Letteren [Egyptologie] of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

Prior to his appointment at Swansea University, Dr. Sagrillo was a Visiting Lecturer in Egyptology in Departments of History and Archæology of Peking University [Běijīng dàxué], Běijīng, China; and a lecturer in the Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA.

Dr. Sagrillo is a member of the International Association of Egyptologists, München, Germany; the Egyptian Exploration Society, London, UK; the American Research Center in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt; and the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities, Toronto, Canada.

Areas of Expertise

  • Third Intermediate Period
  • Ancient Egyptian History
  • Ancient Egyptian foreign relations

Publications

  1. King Djeḥuty-em-ḥat in Swansea: Three model scribal palettes in the collection of the Egypt Centre of Swansea University. In A true scribe of Abydos: Essays on first millennium Egypt in honour of Anthony Leahy.. (pp. 385-414). Leuven: Uitgeverij Peeters.
  2. Shoshenq I and biblical Šîšaq: A philological defense of their traditional equation. In Peter J. James; Peter Gert van der Veen (Ed.), Solomon and Shishak: Current perspectives from archaeology, epigraphy, history and chronology. (pp. 61-81). Oxford: Archaeopress.
  3. Šîšaq’s army: 2 Chronicles 12:2–3 from an Egyptological perspective. In Gershon Galil, Ayelet Gilboa, Aren M. Maeir, Danʾel Kahn (Ed.), The ancient Near East in the 12th–10th Centuries BCE: Culture and history. (pp. 425-450). Münster: Ugarit-Verlag.
  4. The heart scarab of King Shoshenq III (Brooklyn Museum 61.10). Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 97, 240-246.
  5. The geographic origins of the ‘Bubastite’ Dynasty and possible locations for the royal residence and burial place of Shoshenq I. In Gerardus Petrus Franciscus Broekman, Robert Johannes Demarée, Olaf Ernst Kaper (Ed.), The Libyan period in Egypt: Historical and cultural studies into the 21st–24th Dynasties. (pp. 341-359). Leiden and Leuven: Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten and Uitgeverij Peeters.

See more...

Teaching

  • CL-M36 Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for the MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

  • CL-M73 Beginning Middle Egyptian1 (MA)

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts.

  • CL-M74 Beginning Middle Egyptian 2 (MA)

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts. It builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in Middle Egyptian Language 1 for MA students and takes the student on to a better understanding of Egyptian grammar and culture.

  • CL-M92 Intermediate Middle Egyptian 1 (MA)

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CL-M93 Intermediate Middle Egyptian 2 (MA)

    This module introduces students to a selection of major literary texts written in Middle Egyptian.

  • CL-M96 Rags and tatters: Ancient Egyptian history and historiography

    Despite its fundamental importance, the study of Egyptian history suffers from a major problem: the current existence of only a handful of historical sources -- a vanishingly tiny fraction of that which must once have existed -- a textual corpus that Alan Gardiner once characterized as "a collection of rags and tatters." This module will examine how Egyptian history has been reconstructed from this tiny corpus of Egyptian historical texts, ranging from the Old Kingdom through the Late Period. The texts to be studied will include formal, state-sponsored documents such as royal annals, battle reliefs, and ¿victory stelae,¿ as well as private notices of historical events mentioned in autobiographies and letters. Most texts studied will be Egyptian, but with important additions from the Kushite, Levantine, Mesopotamian, and Greek spheres (especially when an event is mentioned by more than one cultural group). Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of the texts and their meanings from an Egyptian perspective and their role in Egyptian society.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availability of supervisors and library material. This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLE112 Beginning Middle Egyptian 1 (Year 1)

    This module introduces the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE113 Beginning Middle Egyptian Language 2 (Year 1)

    This module continues the formal study of Classical Egyptian grammar in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE200 The art of ancient Egypt: continuity and change

    This module is an introduction to the visual art and material culture of ancient Egypt in a variety of media, from the Predynastic Period through the Late Period and after. It will also touch upon the impact of Egyptian art on neighboring areas, such as western Asia and the Middle and Upper Nile Valley (the Sudan). After initially delving into theoretical aspects of art history, the module will examine the technical and aesthetic developments in Egyptian art, examining on their cultural, religious, and political contexts. Issues such as the purposes of ancient Egyptian art, state vs private art, religious and funerary vs ¿secular,¿ portraiture, etc. will be discussed as well.

  • CLE221 Intermediate Middle Egyptian 1 (Year 2)

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE225 Beginning Middle Egyptian 1 (Year 2)

    This module introduces the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE226 Beginning Middle Egyptian 2 (Year 2)

    This module continues the formal study of Classical Egyptian grammar in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE325 Intermediate Middle Egyptian 1 (Year 3)

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE396 A collection of rags and tatters. Ancient Egyptian history and historiography

    Despite its fundamental importance, the study of Egyptian history suffers from a major problem: the current existence of only a handful of historical sources -- a vanishingly tiny fraction of that which must once have existed -- a textual corpus that Alan Gardiner once characterized as "a collection of rags and tatters." This module will examine how Egyptian history has been reconstructed from this tiny corpus of Egyptian historical texts, ranging from the Old Kingdom through the Late Period. The texts to be studied will include formal, state-sponsored documents such as royal annals, battle reliefs, and ¿victory stelae,¿ as well as private notices of historical events mentioned in autobiographies and letters. Most texts studied will be Egyptian, but with important additions from the Kushite, Levantine, Mesopotamian, and Greek spheres (especially when an event is mentioned by more than one cultural group). Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of the texts and their meanings from an Egyptian perspective and their role in Egyptian society.

Supervision

  • Female religious practitioners of Old and Middle Kingdom Egypt. [This is going to be revised] (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska
  • Amulets of the First Millennium BC in Lower Egypt (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Christian Knoblauch
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Christian Knoblauch