Dr Troy Sagrillo
Senior Lecturer
Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology
Telephone: (01792) 513538
Room: Office - 213
Second Floor
James Callaghan
Singleton Campus

Dr. Troy Leiland Sagrillo is a Senior Lecturer in Egyptology in the Department of History and Classics.

He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in Illustration and Graphic Design at the Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, and regularly uses his design skills as an epigrapher and archæological illustrator on archæological missions in Egypt. He completed a Master of Arts (MA) degree in Syro-Palestinian Archæology in the Department of Near Eastern Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson. His Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Egyptology was begun in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto, and was completed in the Faculteit Letteren [Egyptologie] of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

Prior to his appointment at Swansea University, Dr. Sagrillo was a Visiting Lecturer in Egyptology in Departments of History and Archæology of Peking University [Běijīng dàxué], Běijīng, China; and a lecturer in the Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA.

Dr. Sagrillo is a member of the International Association of Egyptologists, München, Germany; the Egyptian Exploration Society, London, UK; the American Research Center in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt; and the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities, Toronto, Canada.

Areas of Expertise

  • Third Intermediate Period
  • Ancient Egyptian History
  • Ancient Egyptian foreign relations

Publications

  1. Sagrillo, T. King Djeḥuty-em-ḥat in Swansea: Three model scribal palettes in the collection of the Egypt Centre of Swansea University (Ed.), A true scribe of Abydos: Essays on first millennium Egypt in honour of Anthony Leahy. 385 414 Leuven Uitgeverij Peeters
  2. Sagrillo, T. Shoshenq I and biblical Šîšaq: A philological defense of their traditional equation (Ed.), Solomon and Shishak: Current perspectives from archaeology, epigraphy, history and chronology 61 81 Oxford Archaeopress
  3. Sagrillo, T. Šîšaq’s army: 2 Chronicles 12:2–3 from an Egyptological perspective (Ed.), The ancient Near East in the 12th–10th Centuries BCE: Culture and history 425 450 Münster Ugarit-Verlag
  4. Sagrillo, T. The heart scarab of King Shoshenq III (Brooklyn Museum 61.10) Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 97 240 246
  5. Sagrillo, T. The geographic origins of the ‘Bubastite’ Dynasty and possible locations for the royal residence and burial place of Shoshenq I (Ed.), The Libyan period in Egypt: Historical and cultural studies into the 21st–24th Dynasties 341 359 Leiden and Leuven Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten and Uitgeverij Peeters

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Teaching

  • CL-M09 Dissertation in Ancient History and or Classical Literature

    Dissertation in Ancient History or an approved Classical subject.

  • CL-M101 Middle Egyptian Texts (MA)

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script, focusing on reading ancient texts in the original. Texts that will be studied may include the Shipwrecked Sailor, Papyrus Westcar (Khufu and the Magicians), the Story of Sinuhe, and others.

  • CL-M102 Egyptology Research Portfolio

    This module is designed to help students to identify a master's dissertation topic appropriate to their interests and expertise and that of the staff. It also enables them to tackle the problems of methodology, acquire the research techniques and undertake the project planning which are the necessary preliminaries to researching and writing a 20,000 word dissertation.

  • CL-M36 Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for the MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

  • CL-M42 Introduction to Late Egyptian (MA)

    This module will introduce the student to the Late Egyptian language of the New Kingdom and Third Intermediate Period. The differences between Late Egyptian and Middle Egyptian orthography, morphology and grammar will be discussed and students will read a variety of Late Egyptian texts to practice their translation skills.

  • CL-M73 Beginning Middle Egyptian1 (MA)

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts.

  • CL-M74 Beginning Middle Egyptian 2 (MA)

    The module introduces the student to the writing system of ancient Egypt and the language of hieroglyphic texts. It builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in Middle Egyptian Language 1 for MA students and takes the student on to a better understanding of Egyptian grammar and culture.

  • CL-M99 After Empire: Egypt during the first millennium BCE

    This module takes a close look at approximately 1000 years of ancient Egyptian history and cultural development, the Third Intermediate Period (Dynasties 21-25) and the Late Period (Dynasty 26-31). This era is widely ignored in both popular and academic studies of ancient Egypt, falling between the imperial New Kingdom and the later Ptolemaic Period. However, it is fascinating in its own right, being a period of time when Egypt was often not unified politically, and frequently ruled by non-Egyptians (Libyans, Kushites, Assyrians, Persians), but also marked by much greater contact with the broader Mediterranean world. A variety of approaches will be taken, drawing from Egyptian, Kushite, Levantine (including biblical), and Mesopotamian evidence, as well as historians writing in Greek or Latin.

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availability of supervisors and library material. This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLE216 Middle Egyptian Texts (Year 2)

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script, focusing on reading ancient texts in the original. Texts that will be studied may include the Shipwrecked Sailor, Papyrus Westcar (Khufu and the Magicians), the Story of Sinuhe, and others.

  • CLE217 Introduction to Late Egyptian (Year 2)

    This module will introduce the student to the Late Egyptian language of the New Kingdom and Third Intermediate Period, which developed out of Middle Egyptian, but with significant changes in the writing system and in verbal syntax. The differences between Late Egyptian and Middle Egyptian orthography, morphology, and syntax will be discussed. Students will read a variety of Late Egyptian texts to practice their translation skills.

  • CLE225 Beginning Middle Egyptian 1 (Year 2)

    This module introduces the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE226 Beginning Middle Egyptian 2 (Year 2)

    This module continues the formal study of Classical Egyptian grammar in the hieroglyphic script.

  • CLE229 Ancient Egyptian Stories, Spells, Poems and Propaganda

    The Ancient Egyptians prided themselves on their eloquence, and this culture produced some of the earliest examples of major genres including narratives, spells, stories, poems, and propaganda. This module introduces the student to a range of texts in translation as well as the problems and methods of interpretation within the context of Ancient Egyptian culture.

  • CLE320 Introduction to Late Egyptian (BA)

    This module will introduce the student to the Late Egyptian language of the New Kingdom and Third Intermediate Period. The differences between Late Egyptian and Middle Egyptian orthography, morphology and grammar will be discussed and the students will read a variety of Late Egyptian texts to practice their translation skills.

  • CLE349 Middle Egyptian Texts

    This module continues the study the grammar of the Middle Egyptian language in the hieroglyphic script, focusing on reading ancient texts in the original. Texts that will be studied may include the Shipwrecked Sailor, Papyrus Westcar (Khufu and the Magicians), the Story of Sinuhe, and others.

  • CLE390 Critical source analysis in Egyptology

    This module will introduce students to the critical analysis of the main types of primary evidence for Egyptological enquiry, both textual and archaeological, including historical data, literature, formal and vernacular art and architecture, archaeological excavations, etc. in order to facilitate student acquisition of skills necessary to undertake research. It is largely independent study.

  • CLE391 Independent research project/dissertation in Egyptology

    In this module, students will conduct a guided, independent research project in Egyptology under supervision. This will entail students collecting and analyzing data, as well as writing up their projects in a 6000-8000 word document (not including a required bibliography). Students will select a specific topic from a range of topics based on the availability of supervisors and library material. Students may also propose their own topics in consultation with, and approval of, a member of Egyptology staff. Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will organise group sessions with his/her supervisees, and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions. The module will be taught by means of three practical seminars on research and writing skills, and through three formal supervision sessions with a project supervisor. The specific form the project to be submitted will be discussed with, and approved by, the project supervisor, but all will involve a substantial piece of written. Typical examples include (but are not limited to): - An argumentative essay developing a central thesis. - A museum project involving one or more items from an Egyptological collection(s). - A translation, philological analysis, and commentary of a substantial ancient Egyptian text appropriate to the student¿s previous attainment in the Egyptian language, which has not been studied by the student previously. - An in-depth analysis/exposé of a pharaonic Egyptian archaeological site (usually, but not necessarily, located in Egypt). - An art historical overview of the development of specific iconography.

  • CLE399 After Empire: Pharaonic Egypt in the first millennium BCE

    This module takes a close look at approximately 1000 years of ancient Egyptian history and cultural development, the Third Intermediate Period (Dynasties 21-25) and the Late Period (Dynasty 26-31). This era is widely ignored in both popular and academic studies of ancient Egypt, falling between the imperial New Kingdom and the later Ptolemaic Period. However, it is fascinating in its own right, being a period of time when Egypt was often not unified politically, and frequently ruled by non-Egyptians (Libyans, Kushites, Assyrians, Persians), but also marked by much greater contact with the broader Mediterranean world. A variety of approaches will be taken, drawing from Egyptian, Kushite, Levantine (including biblical), and Mesopotamian evidence, as well as historians writing in Greek or Latin.

Supervision

  • The Khenerout of Ancient Egypt: The significance of a female class of priesthood from the Old to the New Kingdom (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Kasia Szpakowska
  • Amulets of the First Millennium BC in Lower Egypt (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Christian Knoblauch
  • The use of gold, its alloys, and silver in pharaonic Egypt from early dynastic through the Middle Kingdom (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Christian Knoblauch
    Other supervisor: Dr Ersin Hussein
  • Creating the king in early Saite Egypt: Changing ideologies of rulership under Psamtik I (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Christian Knoblauch