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Tracey Rihll taught at Leeds and Lampeter before Swansea, where she moved in 1990. She serves on the Council of the Hellenic Society, the editorial advisory board of Vulcan: The Journal of the Social and Cultural History of Military Technology (Brill), and is co-editor of Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science (Institute for Research in Classical Philosophy and Science, Princeton). She received an Onassis Foreigner's Fellowship in 2010-2011, and a Swansea University Distinguished Teaching Award in 2012.

She has long specialized in the history of ancient science and technology, and more recently has been extending into the area of science and technology studies more generally. She also continues to work on slavery, and the social, economic and political history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.

Publications

  1. Depreciation in Vitruvius. Classical Quarterly 63(2), 893-897.
  2. Technology and Society in the Ancient Greek and Roman Worlds. Washington DC: The American Historical Association and the Society for the History of technology.
  3. & Phatic Technologies. Technology in Society 33, 44-51.
  4. Greek science. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  5. (Eds.). Science and mathematics in ancient Greek culture. C.J.Tuplin and T.E.Rihll (Ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Teaching

  • CLD300 Classics, Ancient History, Egyptology Dissertation

    Dissertation module for students doing single honours or joint honours degrees in Classics, Classical Civilisation, Ancient History or Egyptology. The aim is for students to do detailed research, to work on a project for several months and to produce a scholarly study of c. 8000-10000 words. The dissertation topic can be chosen freely, in consultation with a member of academic staff and subject to compatibility with a student's degree scheme and availability of supervisors and library material. This is a chance for students to pursue an area in which they are especially interested, and to deal with it in depth. Students may choose to do museum-based research. There are two preparatory pieces of assessment: an abstract, outline and bibliography, and an analysis of crucial source material and/or secondary literature. Work on the dissertation itself takes up most of the two semesters. Students are expected to do research independently, but there is a series of lectures in the first semester to provide advice on research and scholarly writing, Every student will be assigned a supervisor who will be organising group sessions with his/her supervisees and who will also be available for one-to-one supervision sessions.

  • CLH100 Greek History and Society

    This module offers an introduction to Greek history and society, with a focus on Greece in the fifth century BC. We will deal with two major conflicts, namely the Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian War betwen Athens and Sparta. In this period, Athens tested democracy to its limits and for the first time large alliances of states played a role in shaping events. At the same time, the fifth century BC saw astonishing developments in Greek culture, for example drama and philosophy, and - most relevant to this module - the invention of history writing as we know it. You will get a chance to look at ancient source material (particularly texts) to study the ancient perspectives on momentous events and to find out what Greeks' lives were like in antiquity. At the same time, this module pays particular attention to students' history writing, providing you with the chance to practice essay writing early on with extra support and quick feedback. There is also an electronic test which will encourage you to read a piece of ancient evidence with special attention to detail. You will attend weekly seminars which will allow you to practice the interpretation of ancient sources. At the end of the semester, the whole class will take part in an Athenian-style assembly meeting to give you a sense of how an ancient city made decisions.

  • CLH268 Beyond Mainland Greece: Asia in the Classical and Hellenistic Periods.

    This module explores Asia during the Classical and Hellenistic periods, offering students the opportunity to place Greek history and culture into its wider context. At the core of the module are six regional case studies reaching across the continent, which examine local experiences across some 400 years of history. This was an age of empires (Persian and Macedonian) and we examine how foreign rule affected local culture and, in turn, how local cultures shaped these imperial powers. A number of thematic studies explore key issues across the whole continent, introducing students to comparative history whilst examining the challenges of ruling a multi-cultural empire. We also investigate the relationship between the Greek mainland and Asia, exploring how ideas were exchanged, how the Greeks described Asia, and how this Greek view has influenced our own. The course will give students the skills required to analyse an array of sources ¿ literary, archaeological, artistic ¿ focusing particularly on understanding the relationship between written evidence and material culture.

  • CLH368 Beyond Mainland Greece: Asia in the Classical and Hellenistic Periods.

    This module explores Asia during the Classical and Hellenistic periods, offering students the opportunity to place Greek history and culture into its wider context. At the core of the module are six regional case studies reaching across the continent, which examine local experiences across some 400 years of history. This was an age of empires (Persian and Macedonian) and we examine how foreign rule affected local culture and, in turn, how local cultures shaped these imperial powers. A number of thematic studies explore key issues across the whole continent, introducing students to comparative history whilst examining the challenges of ruling a multi-cultural empire. We also investigate the relationship between the Greek mainland and Asia, exploring how ideas were exchanged, how the Greeks described Asia, and how this Greek view has influenced our own. The course will give students the skills required to analyse an array of sources ¿ literary, archaeological, artistic ¿ focusing particularly on understanding the relationship between written evidence and material culture.