Dr Patrick Cockburn
Senior Lecturer in Political Economy and Philosophy
Political and Cultural Studies
Telephone: (01792) 602215

I am currently Senior Lecturer in Political Economy and Philosophy, having joined the department in 2019 after 11 years at Aarhus University, Denmark. My research focuses on problems of economic justice, and builds bridges between political philosophy and the social sciences of economic life. My recent work examines economic dependence and the relation between earned and unearned income, with recent publications including The Politics of Dependence (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) and Contested Property Claims (Routledge, 2018). I currently teach primarily on the BA programmes in Politics, in Philosophy, and in PPE, and welcome inquiries about supervision in topics concerning social and economic justice.

Research Group: Political Analysis and Governance

Publications

  1. Cockburn, P. The Politics of Dependence: Economic Parasites and Vulnerable Lives New York Palgrave Macmillan
  2. Cockburn, P., Thorup, M. Proprietors and parasites Philosophy & Social Criticism 44 2 179 199
  3. Bruun, M., Cockburn, P., Risager, B., Thorup, M. Contested Property Claims: What Disagreement Tells us About Ownership (Ed.), Social Justice Oxon and New York Routledge
  4. Cockburn, P., Bruun, M., Risager, B., Thorup, M. Introduction: Disagreement as a Window onto Property (Ed.), Contested Property Claims: What Disagreement Tells us About Ownership 1 20 Oxon and New York Routledge
  5. Cockburn, P. Book Review: Just Property: Vol II: Enlightenment, Revolution and History Political Studies Review 15 4

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Teaching

  • PO-131 Introduction to Politics

    This module introduces students to the core concepts, and intellectual and practical skills essential to the successful study of Politics and offers an opportunity to develop them by wrestling with big Politics questions. It primarily aims to give a grounding in the topics at the core of Politics, and equips students to navigate successfully within the field. The module also aims to improve students┬┐ practical academic skills, including how to find and use sources, read texts critically, and write to scholarly academic standards.

  • PO-245 The History of Political Thought

    This module examines the history of political thought in the West, as it has developed through key political thinkers. In so doing, it traces the development of core political concepts and values, such as democracy, freedom and rights. The course thus has two main aims. First, to provide students with an understanding of pivotal political thinkers and their works. Second, to equip students with an appreciation of how the history of political thought has shaped the current political landscape. The module is designed to enrich the topics covered in the first-year module Political Philosophy by placing them within a historical context.

  • PO-246 The History of Political Thought (10cr version)

    This module examines the history of political thought in the West, as it has developed through key political thinkers. In so doing, it traces the development of core political concepts and values, such as democracy, freedom and rights. The course thus has two main aims. First, to provide students with an understanding of pivotal political thinkers and their works. Second, to equip students with an appreciation of how the history of political thought has shaped the current political landscape. The module is designed to enrich the topics covered in the first-year module Political Philosophy by placing them within a historical context.

  • PO-3319 Researching Politics 1

    Researching Politics (RP) provides students with the skills that underlie the process of conducting and communicating cutting-edge research in Politics and International Relations. RP works by creating topic groups, each comprised of 8-10 students. Each group will follow a bespoke course set out by their topic tutor, guiding them through the literature in a substantive research area. Students are invited to select a list of preferred options in the first teaching week of the term. This list is then used to assign students to topics and group sessions run from the second week of teaching onwards. Alongside the topic-specific teaching, there is a general lecture series focusing on discovering, analysing and presenting complex information. The lecture series also focuses on dealing with the ups and downs of working as part of a team.

  • PO-345 Contemporary Political Economy: Competing Perspectives on Global Capitalism

    Conceived as a sequel to the Level 2 module on 'Global Political Economy;From Mercantilism to Neoliberalism' (PO-219), this module deals with : the ascendancy of neoliberal global capitalism and neoliberal global governance;information and communication technology (ICT), the knowledge economy, and the changing world of work;'financialization', the international economic boom of 2001-2007, and the causes and consequences of the major Euro-Western economic crises that began in 2007-2008; trends in global poverty and inequality, and competing ways of conceptualizing and dealing with these problems; human development and capacity building; social capital; social enterprise, and micro-finance; new institutionalism; the political economy of 'emerging economies' and of particular regions or categories of economics, such as Communist and post- Communist states, oil states, Africa, the Arab world, and Latin America; the bases and global implications of the rise of the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India and China); and the global ecosystem and the contested ecological 'limits to growth'. There will be a strong focus on the institutional and philosophical underpinnings of economic development, the thinking of prominent Western and non-Western political economists, and practical ways of empowering the world's poor and curbing capitalist excesses. The module will conclude by weighing up whether Western rationalism, secularism, individualism, materialism and neoliberal globalization have helped reduce or to intensify systematic global and regional hierarchies and impoverishment; and whether the still dominant neoliberal versions of global capitalism are economically, politically, morally and ecologically defensible and sustainable. The module is seminar based.