Hello! I teach and supervise research students in the areas of German language, translation and transediting, literature, song cultures, and film studies; also literary translation and retranslation, history of translation, and translation ethics. My PhD students’ projects involve(d) Turkish, Italian, Polish and Belarusian, Chinese, and Arabic, as well as German-language sources.

In 2017 I co-founded the Swansea Translation and Interpreting Group (STING). It’s a forum for researchers, students and practitioners. We also have a series of public workshops and an international conference in 2020 on Computer-Assisted Literary Translation.

I co-founded Swansea University’s Centre on Digital Arts and Humanities (CODAH) and was its co-director (2014-2018).

Version Variation Visualisation is a collaborative project I lead, funded by the AHRC (2012) and the British Academy (2017). We apply Digital Humanities methods to the problems of navigating and understanding multiple comparable translations of a work. We have published several articles, most featuring a corpus of c.40 German translations of Shakespeare’s “Othello”. See outputs here. 

Publications include 1) books on German street ballads (1994), the German-Turkish novel (2007), the writers Zafer Senocak (2003) and Feridun Zaimoglu (2012) (both co-edited with Karin Yesilada), and “German Text Crimes” (2013); 2) articles on topics such as German hip hop, late Goethe, Werner Herzog, the trans-editing of international broadcasters’ news texts (with Arnd Nohl), and community interpreting by/with refugees in Swansea (with Feliz Celik); 3) translated poetry, fiction and essays by writers including Volker Braun, Esther Dischereit, Ulrike Draesner, Jörg Bernig, Herbert Grönemeyer, Soleïman Adel Guémar, Till Lindemann, Albert Ostermaier, Zafer Şenocak, and Feridun Zaimoglu.

I organise cultural events around multilingual poetry, and am a founder member of Wales PEN Cymru. With Eric Ngalle Charles and Sylvie Hoffmann, I set up non-profit publisher Hafan Books in 2003. We have published over 30 books: writing by refugees in Wales, alongside work by other writers of Wales. Money raised goes the charity Swansea Asylum Seekers Support.

 

Publications

  1. Alharbi, M., Cheesman, T., & Laramee, B. (n.d.) TransVis: Integrated Distant and Close Reading of Othello Translations. IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 26(10?), 1-1.
  2. Z., G., T., C., R., S., K., F., S., T., Cheesman, T., & Laramee, B. ShakerVis: Visual analysis of segment variation of German translations of Shakespeare's Othello. Information Visualization, 14(4), 273-288.
  3. Celik, F. & Cheesman, T. Non-professional Interpreters in Counselling for Asylum Seeking and Refugee Women. Torture Journal, 28(2), 85-98.
    https://irct.org/publications/torture-journal/141
  4. Cheesman, T., Flanagan, K., Thiel, S., Rybicki, J., Laramee, B., Hope, J., & Roos, A. Multi-Retranslation Corpora: Visibility, Variation, Value, and Virtue. Literary and Linguistic Computing [Digital Scholarship in the Humanities], 32(4), 739-760.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw027
  5. Cheesman, T., Flanagan, K., Thiel, S., & Rybicki, J. Five Maps of Translations of Shakespeare. Un/Translatables: New Maps for Germanic Literatures (pp. 253-278). Northwestern University Press

See more...

Teaching

  • ML-320 Modern Languages Dissertation Preparation

    This module introduces you to the practice of research and dissertation writing in the field of Modern Languages and will guide you in the first part of your dissertation preparation. Areas covered include: selecting a relevant topic, asking relevant research questions, preparing and writing up a literature review, preparing and writing up a research proposal, research methods and library research tools, making use of foreign-language sources, structuring your dissertation, analysis and argumentation, compiling a bibliography. In addition to lectures and seminars, you will have three meetings with your supervisor. By the end of the module you will have developed your dissertation topic, know what methodology you will use and have acquired knowledge of how to organise and lay out your dissertation. Assessment for the module consists of a literature review, a research proposal and a presentation.

  • ML-321 Modern Languages Dissertation

    This module provides students with the opportunity to research one aspect of French, German, Italian or Hispanic culture in detail, and to present the findings of their research in a dissertation of 8000 words. The module will be taught by means of four practical seminars on research and writing skills, and through three formal supervision sessions with a dissertation supervisor. Your supervisor will help you to find a topic, suggest research strategies, agree a suitable title, discuss the structure of your dissertation, and will read closely and comment on one draft chapter. The topic may relate to a module you are doing at Level 3, provided that this does not involve a duplication of material and is agreed with the module coordinator in advance. The dissertations may be written in English, in your target language, or in Welsh (where Welsh-medium provision is available).

  • MLG160B German Language 1B

    This module is the foundation of advanced level study of German which will equip students with the skills needed to use German in day-to-day life and professional environments. The module aims to consolidate and extend the language skills developed by students at A level (or equivalent) and to facilitate their progress in linguistic competence. It concentrates on further developing fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German, establishing a firm grammatical understanding of the language, and extending students¿ vocabulary to read, write, interpret and speak about issues related to contemporary German society and culture appropriate to levels B1/B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). The module also aims to enhance students¿ employability by providing a grounding in the vocabulary and use of German in contexts relating to the world of work. It is typically taken in conjunction with MLG160A. Classes will be conducted mainly in German. This module is also available through the medium of Welsh.

  • MLG208 Improving your German with Poetry

    Classical lyric poetry in the German tradition uses dense and complex structures in language which is pared down to the grammatical and semantic essentials. Learning to read poetry can be for this reason one of the most rewarding exercises for Germanists. Lyric poems are short. Poetic styles, like the German language more generally, have also evolved in fascinating ways between the era of the troubadours at the end of the twelfth century and the present day. In contrast, poets from all ages are interested in the same big themes, such as love, nature, God, and politics. This module is about interrogating a selected corpus of some 100 lyric poems taken from across the centuries and centring on one or more of these themes. We learn how poems are put together and explore how renowned poets (from Walter von der Vogelweide to Rilke and Morgenstern via Gryphius, Goethe, Hoelderlin, and Heine) use rhyme, metre and an array of language tropes. All the time you acquire new vocabulary and practise comprehension of advanced grammatical forms.

  • MLG270B Intermediate German Language 2B

    This module is the foundation of advanced level study of German which will equip students who have previously taken MLG108 and MLG109 Beginner German with the skills needed to use German in general and professional environments. The module concentrates on further developing fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German, establishing a firm grammatical understanding of the language, and extending students¿ vocabulary to read, write, interpret and speak about issues related to contemporary German society and culture. The module also aims to enhance students¿ employability by providing a grounding in the vocabulary and use of German in contexts relating to the world of work. It is typically taken in conjunction with MLG270A. Classes will be conducted mainly in German.

  • MLG301B German General Language 3B

    This module offers practice and development of skills in translation from English into German at an advanced level, as well as German oral and communication skills. Writing and oral classes will give you practice in the exercises covered by the module. Following an integrated teaching approach you will also be able to reinforce and expand your existing grammatical knowledge in a series of grammar workshops. One hour per week is dedicated to oral practice, further increasing your speaking and listening skills. You are expected to take part in class discussions with a native speaker of German based on written texts, audio and video materials. All classes are conducted mainly through the medium of the target language. In addition to class work, students are expected to undertake extensive private study.

  • MLG308 Improving your German with Poetry

    Classical lyric poetry in the German tradition uses dense and complex structures in language which is pared down to the grammatical and semantic essentials. Learning to read poetry can be for this reason one of the most rewarding exercises for Germanists. Lyric poems are short. Poetic styles, like the German language more generally, have also evolved in fascinating ways between the era of the troubadours at the end of the twelfth century and the present day. In contrast, poets from all ages are interested in the same big themes: love, nature, God, and politics. This module is about interrogating a selected corpus of some 100 lyric poems taken from across the centuries and centring on one or more of these themes. We learn how poems are put together and explore how renowned poets (from Walter von der Vogelweide to Rilke and Morgenstern via Gryphius, Goethe, Hoelderlin, and Heine) use rhyme, metre and an array of language tropes. All the time you acquire new vocabulary and practise comprehension of advanced grammatical forms.

  • MLGM60 Advanced English-German Translation for MA Exchange Students

    This module is only available to students coming to Swansea on an approved, single-semester M-level exchange from a translation and/or interpreting school in Europe (e.g. from the METS consortium). Teaching and assessment are identical to either the first or the second semester of the existing 20 credit, 2-semester Advanced Translation modules MLgM01 (Germanto English) OR MLGM30 (English to German), OR an approved mixture between them. Students taking MLGM60 will attend the same classes and submit the same two written assessments as those taking the corresponding semester of the longer module(s).

Supervision

  • A study of the principal translations into English of Cervantes's Don Quijote, up to the end of the eighteenth century. (current)

    MA
    Other supervisor: Dr Lloyd Davies
  • It is not up to me to do this. We will have to ask him. (current)

    MA
    Other supervisor: Prof Julian Preece
  • THE LAKE AND THE SHED: «br /»«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /»«br /» A FORMALIST AND COLERIDGEAN READING OF J. K. ROWLING (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Julian Preece
  • A Study of Xiao Qian as a Translation Theorist and Translator (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Sabrina Wang
  • HYBRIDITY AND CULTURAL CRISIS IN THE INDIAN QUINTET OF MERCHANT IVORY (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Julian Preece
  • Design, compilation and applications of an English-Polish-Belarusian Parallel Literary Corpus (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrew Rothwell
  • 'Italian Translations of the Works of P.G. Wodehouse: an Epistemic Approach' (awarded 2018)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Roberta Magnani

Key Grants and Projects

Research Groups