Science Cafe: The Fukushima Nuclear disaster - Four years on

The Swansea Science Cafe offers opportunities for anyone to find out more about new, exciting and topical areas of science in an informal and enter

Title:The Fukushima Nuclear disaster - Four years on

Speaker: Brian Jones, Vice Chair, Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), Cymru

Date: Wednesday 25th March

Time: 7.30 pm

Venue: The Dylan Thomas Centre, Swansea

Admission: Free, all welcome

Brian Jones visited the Fukushima region in October 2014 as part of a 34-strong international Green Cross Study Tour looking at the consequences of the nuclear disaster following the tsunami in 2011. The group included a British MEP, a Canadian MP, a Swiss national Councillor and a Brazilian Mayor, plus representatives from eight other countries and six journalists.  His illustrated talk will briefly describe what happened when the tsunami struck the Fukushima nuclear power plants, and will concentrate on the challenges face by the authorities still trying the deal with the consequence of the accident, and with the life changing problems of ordinary people who use to live near the nuclear plant.  The talk will not include any nuclear physics but will concentrate on the human and environmental aspects of the incident.

Contact details: http://swansea.ac.uk/science/swanseasciencecafe/

About Science Cafe Wales

Each month, a leading expert in their field will give a brief introductory talk followed by a friendly informal chat. You can sit back, relax with a drink and listen or get involved in the discussion and debate. The Science Café organisers are committed to promoting public engagement with science and to making science accountable.

Science Café Wales are held in casual settings in Cardiff, Swansea and Bangor. They are informal and accessible and entrance is entirely free. They usually start with a short talk from the speaker, usually a scientist or writer, followed by a quick break and then an hour or so of discussion afterwards.

Previous topics have included dark matter, the common cold, Dr Who, the Big Bang and alternative therapies.

The first Cafes Scientifiques in the UK were held in Leeds in 1998. From there cafés gradually spread across the country.

Currently, some 40 or so cafés meet regularly to hear scientists or writers on science talk about their work and discuss it with diverse audiences