Earth's Deep History: How It Was Discovered and Why It Matters

How has our understanding of the Earth’s history changed? Who made the key discoveries about our planet’s past? How has this knowledge shaped our own, much shorter, human history? These questions are at the heart of a public lecture at Swansea University on Friday 3 July, given by Professor Martin Rudwick, winner of the 2015 Dingle Prize.

In his remarkable book, Earth’s Deep History, Professor Rudwick considers the young Earth theories of the seventeenth century to the startling discoveries of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and shows how inquisitive individuals have questioned the story of our planet’s development.

Join us for a journey through Earth’s long past and our far more recent attempts to explain and understand it.
 
The Dingle Prize was established in 1997 to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the British Society for the History of Science, and is named after the mathematician, astronomer and philosopher of science Herbert Dingle, a founder member of the BSHS. 

It is awarded every two years to the best book in the history of science accessible to a wide audience of non-specialists. More information about the prize, including details of past winners, is available at

The lecture is part of the British Society for the History of Science Annual Conference 2015

  • Earth's Deep History: How It Was Discovered and Why It Matters
  • Faraday Lecture Theatre, Swansea University, SA2 8PP
  • Friday 3 July, 5.15-6.00 pm
  • All welcome