Siwan Davies

Siwan Davies

Siwan Davies is a Professor in Geography and uses volcanic ash to help improve our understanding of when our climate changed abruptly in the past. She is an inspiring scientist who has a very successful academic career. She is a recipient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize (2011), Lyell Fund (2013) and currently holds a European Research Council Starting grant. Siwan is also a mother of two young children which shows that having a successful career and a happy family life is achievable. 

She is originally from Newport, Pembrokeshire and after graduating in Geography from the University of Oxford, she completed a Masters and PhD at Royal Holloway, University of London in 2002. Following post-doctoral appointments at Stockholm University and the University of Copenhagen, Siwan joined Swansea University as a Lecturer from the in 2004 and quickly climbed the academic career ladder to be awarded a Personal Chair in 2012. 

Her research has secured funding from NERC, The Leverhulme Trust and the European Research Council (ERC) and she now leads a team of 3 postdoctoral research assistants, 4 PhD students and 2 research technicians.  The ERC-funded research project, TRACE, aims to use volcanic ash layers present in the Greenland ice-cores and North Atlantic marine records to assess whether the atmosphere or the oceans drive Northern hemisphere climate change in the past. She is committed to disseminating her work to the public and frequently gives talks to different audiences. The ASH ICE MUD film describes more about her research. 

Siwan also contributes to Welsh-medium teaching at Swansea and across Wales and is actively engaged with the work of the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol. She has held the position of President of the INQUA International Focus Group on Tephrochronology and Volcanism (INTAV), a member of the NERC Peer-Review College and the Awards Officer for the Quaternary Research Association. Siwan is incredibly supportive as a supervisor and always committed to the professional development of her team members and others within the College of Science.