Showcase Session

Sea-level rise from Glaciers and Ice Sheets

Austin: Friday 31st October

Tavi Murray

Professor Tavi Murray is professor of glaciology, head of Swansea's Glaciology Group, and a deputy Pro Vice Chancellor at Swansea University.

A world authority in glaciology, Professor Murray is at the forefront of research that informs the debate on one of the most pressing issues of our time: climate change.

She is particularly interested in glacier flow and instability and, together with colleagues in the Glaciology Group, she studies the extent to which glaciers are contributing to rises in global sea level, both now and looking into the future.

Current field projects span the Arctic, Antarctic and most of the world’s glaciated regions, with Greenland the location for several of the group’s major projects.

In 2007 Professor Murray was awarded the Polar Medal by the Queen for outstanding service to polar research, at the time one of only seven women to receive this accolade.

Contact: T.Murray@swansea.ac.uk

A GLIMPSE of Greenland: The Disappearing Ice

Glaciology Group

The Glaciology Group


Active projects

Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W): HEFCW and NRW funded. A collaboration between the four largest universities of Wales - Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cardiff and Swansea - supporting world-class climate change research.

SOLIS: NERC funded. Present and future stability of the Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula.

Network of Sensors: NERC funded. Creation of a state-of-the-art wireless network of sensors that will reveal the flow of glaciers at the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet.


Past projects

RABID: NERC funded. Basal conditions on the Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica.

SLICES: NERC funded. Changes in glacier geometry and extent in Svalbard: Implications for sea-level rise during the 20th and 21st centuries.

Tsanfleuron: NERC funded. Effect of the spatial variability of physical parameters on the rheology of temperate glaciers and their modelled response to climate change.

GLIMPSE: Funded by Leverhulme Trust. Determining the controls on thinning at the periphery of the Greenland Ice Sheet.