Publications

  1. & The biopolitical warfare on migrants: EU Naval Force and NATO operations of migration government in the Mediterranean. Critical Military Studies, 1-20.
  2. The politics of counting and the scene of rescue: Border deaths in the mediterranean. Radical Philosophy 192, 1-6.
  3. The government of migrant mobs: Temporary divisible multiplicities in border zones. European Journal of Social Theory
  4. Revisiting the omnes et singulatim bond: The production of irregular conducts and the biopolitics of the governed. Foucault Studies(21), 98-116.
  5. Spaces of Governmentality. Autonomous Migration and the Arab Uprisings. Rownman&Littlefield.

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Teaching

  • GEG268 Dissertation Preparation

    The module prepares students for their independent research dissertation through dissertation fairs, lectures and a series of tutorials focusing upon the formulation and construction of a research proposal. The module also includes three lectures which explore career opportunities for Geography graduates and skills to enhance graduate employability.

  • GEG328 Migration, Security and Humanitarianism

    This module focuses on the interactions of humanitarianism, security, and migration, in Europe and in the Mediterranean region, analysing the articulation between humanitarian and security approaches to migration management. The module looks at spaces of detention, refuge and control across Europe (e.g. Calais, Eidomeni, Lampedusa) and on the southern shore of the Mediterranean (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco). It will introduce students to the politics of externalisation of the EU, analysing how humanitarian and security ways for managing migration have been implemented in third-countries.

  • GEG333 Geographical Research Frontiers

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)

  • GEGM15 Qualitative Research Methods

    This module provides an introduction to the main data-sources and analysis methods used in qualitative research. In addition to covering the key conceptual and epistemological issues associated with qualitative research design, the module provides an introduction to a range of qualitative techniques used in social science research including questionnaire design, interviewing, observational methods, visual methodologies and textual analysis. Issues associated with combining a mixture of qualitative methods are also considered. The strengths and limitations of various techniques are explored with particular emphasis on issues of reliability, validity and representativeness.

  • GEGM19 Advanced Research Methods in Human Geography

    This module provides advanced social science research training as required by the ESRC Doctoral Training Partnership. It is run collaboratively in conjunction with staff from Aberystwyth and Cardiff Universities as part of the Human Geography Pathway of the ESRC DTP and can form part of the '1' (Masters) of a '1+3' research training programme. The module is delivered through two intensive workshop-style seminars, held at Swansea, Cardiff, or Aberystwyth (locations will vary annually), each dedicated to a key style of research. Exemplary themes include Ethnographic Methods for Fieldwork in Human Geography' and 'Critical Methods of Spatial Analysis.' Each event will follow a similar format mixing lecture/seminar presentations with hands-on workshops and discussion sessions, and will be guided by the research interests of participants.

Supervision

  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Angharad Closs Stephens
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Angharad Closs Stephens
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Prof David / Dave Clarke
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Sergei Shubin
  • From City to Nation of Sanctuary: Examining the Political Geographies of Citizenship (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Angharad Closs Stephens
    Other supervisor: Prof Marcus Doel