Publications

  1. & Inter-annual carbon isotope analysis of tree-rings by laser ablation. Chemical Geology
  2. Reply to Piperno et al.: It is too soon to argue for localized, short-term human impacts in interfluvial Amazonia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201705697
  3. An alternative approach to transfer functions? Testing the performance of a functional trait-based model for testate amoebae. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 468, 173-183.
  4. & Reconstructing 800 years of summer temperatures in Scotland from tree rings. Climate Dynamics
  5. & Impact of pre-Columbian “geoglyph” builders on Amazonian forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201614359

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Teaching

  • GEG219 Reconstructing Quaternary Environmental Change

    This module introduces the concept of Quaternary environmental change and the methods used to study them. The module is appropriate for students who would find it valuable to gain an awareness of the nature of archival evidence for recording past environmental changes operating over a range of different timescales during the last 2.4Ma. This course is particularly useful to students who may be considering a Physical Geography dissertation in the field of Environmental Change. Students will be introduced to a range of techniques for assessing past environmental changes. Assessment will be by both examination (50%) and by in-class short answer and multiple choice-type testing in practical classes. Teaching will be conducted through the medium of English, primarily as lecture-based learning. A practical/laboratory taught component (including data analysis) is included in this course. Practical instruction will introduce students to some fundamental laboratory methods and will be conducted and assessed in sub-groups as numbers permit/require.

  • GEG264A Environmental Research Methods A

    The module covers research project design, data collection and some aspects of data analysis. Students are introduced to a range of laboratory and field techniques in physical geography. They gain experience in describing and interpreting results derived from laboratory techniques concerned with reconstructing the depositional history of sediments, chemical analysis of water and sediment from a variety of sources and the simulation of geomorphological processes.

  • GEG268 Dissertation Preparation

    The module prepares students for their independent research dissertation through dissertation fairs, lectures and a series of tutorials focusing upon the formulation and construction of a research proposal. The module also includes three lectures which explore career opportunities for Geography graduates and skills to enhance graduate employability.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG332 Dissertation Support: Geography

    This module provides structured, student-led peer-group support and academic staff group supervision for students undertaking the 30-credit 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module. This support and supervision is assessed through the submission of a PowerPoint Poster in TB1 and the submission in TB2 of an individually composed, critical and reflective log of the 5 dissertation peer-group meetings and the 4 group supervisory meetings (with a verified record of attendance at meetings). Working within a supervised Student Peer Group, you will also have the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This module complements the 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG358 Climate of the last 1000 years

    The aim of this module is to provide the participants with the relevant skills to place the widely reported anthropogenic influences upon climate into the perspective of a naturally changing climatic system. The module focuses upon the techniques used to reconstruct changes in climate over the last 1000 years and presents reconstructions at differing temporal scales. The module is directed towards students with a basic scientific and mathematical background.

  • GEGM06 Dissertation Environmental Dynamics and Climate Change

    This module provides the opportunity to undertake a substantial individual research project in Environmental Dynamics and Climate Change. Support will be provided by a staff supervisor and through student-led discussions. There will also be the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. Interim results will be presented orally (July and August). The final results of the research dissertation will be presented in the form of a scientific paper in the format of a leading international journal in the research area and a one-page summary (not assessed) at a suitable level for an intelligent lay person. In addition to submission of the written document, students are required to make a formal presentation on their research findings during the last week of the period of candidature which is assessed and contributes towards the final grade.

  • GEGM07 Principles of Environmental Dynamics

    This module aims to explain and understand past, present and potential future changes in the Earth's climate and environment. It provides a broad approach to environmental processes and dynamics operating on land, in the oceans and in the atmosphere on a global and regional scale. Emphasis is placed on the evidence available for reconstructing past environmental dynamics, the implications for present-day processes, future predictions and likely impacts.

Supervision

  • A multi-proxy reconstruction of rapid climate change in south Wales between 15,000 and 8,000 years BP (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Siwan Davies