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Teaching

  • GEB301 Interdisciplinary Field Course to the Indian Himalayas (Sikkim)

    This residential field course module explores the relationship between environment and society in the Himalayan state of Sikkim in NE India on the borders with China, Nepal, Tibet and West Bengal. The course is inter-disciplinary in approach and policy-oriented. Students work with members of University Staff in mixed groups of biologists, human geographers, physical geographers and zoologists. Through intensive inter-disciplinary group working students utilise (and pass on) their specialist skills in the group exercises and projects that are undertaken.

  • GEC333 Ffiniau Ymchwil Daearyddol

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)

  • GEG111 Geographical Writing Skills and Personal Development Planning

    This module introduces students to key skills in scientific writing and career development. The module is taught through a tutorial programme throughout the year.

  • GEG118 Moving Worlds: Mobilities and Migrations

    This module is an overview of the two key elements producing moving geographies: mobilities and migrations. It builds an understanding of mobility and migration as relational phenomena, which involve how we form relations with others and make sense of the changing and globalising world. This module introduces moving geographies and focuses on conceptions and debates surrounding notions of space, movement and power. It considers different meanings attached to dislocation and travel, practices helping mobile people to establish links between times and places, diversity of migration experiences and the divisions they produce, and the ways of governing mobilities and migrations. The module is divided into three sections: i) mobility as a common but differentiate experience; ii) migration as a social, economic and politicised phenomenon; and iii) the implications of movement for identity, self and belonging.

  • GEG252N Geographical Fieldwork skills: New York

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions in New York City and applying the relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. The general aims are to observe, analyse and achieve an understanding of the varied geographies and landscapes of the city. The emphasis is on the cultural, political and urban geographies of New York, focussing on landscapes of power, gentrification and resistance, and multiculturalism and diaspora. The module comprises preparatory lectures and small-group preparation work in Swansea, and a week's fieldwork in New York. Assessment is entirely through coursework.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG332 Dissertation Support: Geography

    This module provides structured, student-led peer-group support and academic staff group supervision for students undertaking the 30-credit 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module. This support and supervision is assessed through the submission of a PowerPoint Poster in TB1 and the submission in TB2 of an individually composed, critical and reflective log of the 5 dissertation peer-group meetings and the 4 group supervisory meetings (with a verified record of attendance at meetings). Working within a supervised Student Peer Group, you will also have the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This module complements the 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG333 Geographical Research Frontiers

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)

  • MS-106 Contemporary Welsh Society

    This innovative module presents a contemporary picture of modern Wales. It focuses on various aspects of Welsh society during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through a series of varied teaching sessions presented by active researchers, this module provides a firm theoretical foundation to any student interested in current Welsh society and culture.