Teaching

  • GE-E00 Geography Industrial Placement Year

    The industrial placement year (often referred to as the Year in Industry) takes place before the final year. Only students on schemes which explicitly includes a year in industry are eligible for industrial placements. Students may enrol on programmes with an industrial placement year at the beginning of their studies, subject to appropriate enhanced entry qualifications, or may transfer to such a programme (subject to placement availability) up to the end of Level 5. Students complete a minimum of 40 weeks in a placement in companies in the UK (or potentially outside the UK).

  • GEG100 Geographical skills

    The aim of this module is to introduce the participants to essential geographical skills.These invaluable skills will become enhanced throughout their degree at Swansea University. Participants should be able to apply these techniques to data from a wide variety of environments and contexts. Presentation skills will be covered from the use of tables to the drawing of maps.

  • GEG105 Global Shifts: Towards a New World Order?

    This module introduces the issues and processes shaping the global economy and the geography of the modern world system. The first half of the module explores the transformation of the world system over time, highlighting the onset of modernity, the capitalist system, and the shift to post-modernity, and the implications for geopolitics. The second half of the module explores the geography of production and trade in the contemporary global economy and the influence of nation-states, supra-national institutions and multinational corporations in creating diverse economic geographies.

  • GEG111 Geographical Writing Skills and Personal Development Planning

    This module introduces students to key skills in scientific writing and career development. The module is taught through a tutorial programme throughout the year.

  • GEG221 Regional Economic Development and Policy

    This module is concerned with issues of regional economic development and government policy. The module explores the enduring spatial economic inequalities evident across the regions of the United Kingdom and how successive governments have intervened to alleviate these disparities. The ideological debate around whether, and on what basis, governments should intervene in the economy is examined. This debate is exemplified by contrasting the interventionist regional economic policies of post-war Britain with more contemporary policies which have favoured entrepreneurship, innovation and competitiveness over regional equality. The module then explores the varying policy approaches through an in-depth case study of economic development in Wales.

  • GEG252V Geographical Fieldwork skills: Vancouver

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions within the Vancouver and southern British Columbia context and applying relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. The general aims are to observe, analyse and achieve an understanding of the varied geographical landscape and inherent features of Vancouver and southern British Columbia. Students taking this module will gain experience in research design, methodologies, data analysis and presentation methods, including seminars, posters and reports. Students taking this field course focus on either the physical or human geography on the region and conduct project work appropriate to their specialism. The module comprises preparatory lectures in Swansea during teaching block 2 and a two-week field course, which typically runs in the last week of teaching block 2 into the first week of the Easter vacation.

  • GEG263A Conducting Social Research - Methods

    The module covers research project design and data collection methods. Students are introduced to the availability of different data sources and to the predominant research methods in human geography and the social sciences, including questionnaire surveys, secondary data sources, focus groups, interviews, participant observation and ethnography, and visual and textual methodologies.

  • GEG268 Dissertation Preparation

    The module prepares students for their independent research dissertation through dissertation fairs, lectures and a series of tutorials focusing upon the formulation and construction of a research proposal. The module also includes three lectures which explore career opportunities for Geography graduates and skills to enhance graduate employability.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG332 Dissertation Support: Geography

    This module provides structured, student-led peer-group support and academic staff group supervision for students undertaking the 30-credit 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module. This support and supervision is assessed through the submission of a PowerPoint Poster in TB1 and the submission in TB2 of an individually composed, critical and reflective log of the 5 dissertation peer-group meetings and the 4 group supervisory meetings (with a verified record of attendance at meetings). Working within a supervised Student Peer Group, you will also have the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This module complements the 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG333 Geographical Research Frontiers

    This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competence as a Geographer by undertaking a critical analysis of a wide variety of literature-based sources in order to develop a cogent, substantial, and persuasive argument. While the Dissertation in Geography normally focuses on the design and execution of an evidenced-based research project that assesses the capacity of students to undertake effective data analysis and interpretation, the purpose of this module is to assess the extent to which students are capable of engaging with the academic literature at the frontier of a particular part of Geography. Students select from a wide range of research frontiers in Human and Physical Geography that have been identified by the academic staff within the Department. Given that this module emphasizes student-centred learning, none of the frontiers will have been covered in other modules, although in many cases modules will have taken students up to some of these frontiers. However, to orientate students and provide them with suitable points of departure and way-stations, there will be a brief introduction to each frontier and a short list of pivotal references disseminated via Blackboard. (Note: The topic selected by you must not overlap with the subject of your Dissertation. If there is any doubt about potential overlap, this must be discussed with your Dissertation Support Group supervisor and agreed in writing.)

  • GEG346 Capital and Labour in the 21st century

    This module explores the fundamental shift in manufacturing best-practice in developed capitalist economies in recent decades. Conventional theories of industrial location are contrasted with more `radical┬┐ contemporary theories which emphasize the importance of culture and social capital in the economy. A continual quest for production flexibility has implications for the function of labour within the production process and the segmentation of work and job opportunities within local labour markets, the strategies of labour unions, the utilization of technology within firms and the extent and nature of inter-firm relationships. Spatially, the geography of production has become associated with the dual tendencies towards increased agglomeration, associated with so-called industrial districts and clusters, and globalisation, increasingly associated with global production and value chains.

  • GEGM15 Qualitative Research Methods

    This module provides an introduction to the main data-sources and analysis methods used in qualitative research. In addition to covering the key conceptual and epistemological issues associated with qualitative research design, the module provides an introduction to a range of qualitative techniques used in social science research including questionnaire design, interviewing, observational methods, visual methodologies and textual analysis. Issues associated with combining a mixture of qualitative methods are also considered. The strengths and limitations of various techniques are explored with particular emphasis on issues of reliability, validity and representativeness.

Supervision

  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Christopher Muellerleile