PhD (2001, University of Amsterdam)

Areas of Expertise

  • Glaciology
  • Quaternary Science
  • Glacial sedimentology
  • Glacial geomorphology
  • Micromorphology

Publications

  1. & Landscape evolution of Lundy Island: challenging the proposed MIS 3 glaciation of SW Britain. Proceedings of the Geologists' Assocication
  2. & Sediment fingerprinting and the mode of formation of singular and composite annual moraine ridges at two glacier margins, Jotunheimen, southern Norway. The Holocene
  3. & Deglaciation of a major palaeo-ice stream in Disko Trough, West Greenland. Quaternary Science Reviews 147, 5-26.
  4. & New age constraints for the limit of the British-Irish Ice Sheet on the Isles of Scilly. Journal of Quaternary Science 32(1), 48-62.
  5. & The nature and history of Antarctic glaciation. Circumpolar Journal 12, 23-23.
  6. & Extent of the grounded Antarctic ice sheet in space and time. Circumpolar Journal 11, 72-74.
  7. & Strain Signatures of Fjord Sediment Sliding: Micro-Scale Examples from Yakutat Bay and Glacier Bay, Alaska, U.S.A.. Journal of Sedimentary Research 74(6), 760-769.
  8. Microscopic evidence of grounded ice in the sediments of the CIROS-1 core, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Terra Antartica 6(4), 365-376.
  9. & Micromorphology of Miocene diamicts, indications of grounded ice. Terra Antartica 5(3), 363-366.
  10. Microscopic Analyses of Quaternary Glacigenic Sediments of Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula. Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine Research 33(3), 258-265.

See more...

Teaching

  • GEG108P Geographical Methods: Field Project Practicals & Tutorials (for Physical Geography Students)

    This module involves the preparation, execution and reporting of physical geography fieldwork. The project, entitled ¿Reconstructing Quaternary environmental change on the south coast of the Gower peninsula¿, focuses on some of the field techniques and approaches (mainly sedimentological) that are used to reconstruct environmental change with particular reference to the alternation of glacial and interglacial episodes. The aims are to examine the evidence remaining in the landscape, to describe and analyse the evidence systematically, to interpret the evidence in terms of environmental change, and to reconstruct the sequence of events that have affected this part of Gower. The Gower peninsula is particularly significant in reconstructing Quaternary environmental changes because it lies close to the limit of the last (Devensian) ice sheet. As well as introducing some fundamental techniques that are used in the field for description, measurement and inference, the project will develop your ability to: work effectively in a team; manipulate, analyse and present data; and reason logically. The project requires you to keep a fieldwork notebook and write an individual report, applying the analytic and descriptive skills acquired in GEG100.

  • GEG111 Geographical Writing Skills and Personal Development Planning

    This module introduces students to key skills in scientific writing and career development. The module is taught through a tutorial programme throughout the year.

  • GEG211 Glacial Environments and Processes, past and present

    This module provides a comprehensive examination of processes, sediments and landforms associated with glacial, glacifluvial and glacilacustrine activity. It considers aspects of both past (Quaternary) and present-day glacial environments. The module also introduces basic glaciological concepts such as glacier mass balance, transformation of snow to ice, glacier hydrology and glacier thermal regime, and thus provides a foundation for Level 3 module GEG344 (Glaciology). The basic glaciological concepts are used to illustrate their implications for ice movement, glacial erosion and glacial deposition, and hence, their role in creating `glacial¿ landscapes. Teaching and Learning will be conducted via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars (not assessed) and fieldwork. The fieldwork elaborates on skills and experience acquired in the GEG108P module. The module is assessed through an May/June examination (1 from 3 essay questions, 50%), a poster (40%) and an individual oral 3-minute presentation (10%), based on data collected as a group in a guided fieldwork or laboratory exercise.

  • GEG252A Geographical Fieldwork skills: Austria

    The module is concerned with identifying and defining geographical questions within the Alpine environment of the Austrian Tyrol and applying relevant geographical skills, knowledge and techniques to these questions. This fieldwork-based module focuses on the physical geography of Alpine environments, notably glacial and periglacial geomorphology, recent glacial history, Alpine hydrology and river action, the biogeography of glacier forelands, and the growing human (tourist) impact on Alpine environments. Some aspects of the human environment are also covered. The fieldweek module introduces students to all aspects of project work (identifying and defining geographical problems; formulation of aims, research questions and hypotheses; formulation of an appropriate research design to answer these questions; choice and use of field measurement techniques and field observation; data analysis and interpretation; oral presentation of findings; and structuring and production of academic written reports). A key aim is to prepare students to be able to undertake a final-year dissertation in physical geography. The module comprises a preparatory meeting, a one-week field course, which typically runs in the last week of the summer vacation immediately prior to Level 2 enrolment, and 4 hours of analytical classes during Teaching Block 1 prior to submittal of project reports in early February.

  • GEG264B Environmental Research Methods B

    The module builds upon student knowledge covers research project design, data collection and data analysis. Students are introduced to a range of laboratory and field techniques in physical geography along with statistical analyses and presentation skills. They gain experience in describing and interpreting results derived from laboratory techniques concerned with reconstructing the depositional history of sediments, chemical analysis of sediments from a variety of sources and the simulation of geomorphological processes. Students are also introduced to dissertation research. The module culminates in a poster presentation (including short oral introduction to poster) on one of the projects they have undertaken.

  • GEG268 Dissertation Preparation

    The module prepares students for their independent research dissertation through dissertation fairs, lectures and a series of tutorials focusing upon the formulation and construction of a research proposal. The module also includes three lectures which explore career opportunities for Geography graduates and skills to enhance graduate employability.

  • GEG331 Dissertation Report: Geography

    The dissertation is an original, substantive and independent research project in an aspect of Geography. It is typically based on approximately 20 - 25 days of primary research and several weeks of analysis and write-up. The end result must be less than 10,000 words of text. The dissertation offers you the chance to follow your personal interests and to demonstrate your capabilities as a Geographer. During the course of your dissertation you will be supported by a student-led discussion group and a staff supervisor, and you will also provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This support and supervision is delivered through the 'Dissertation Support' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG332 Dissertation Support: Geography

    This module provides structured, student-led peer-group support and academic staff group supervision for students undertaking the 30-credit 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module. This support and supervision is assessed through the submission of a PowerPoint Poster in TB1 and the submission in TB2 of an individually composed, critical and reflective log of the 5 dissertation peer-group meetings and the 4 group supervisory meetings (with a verified record of attendance at meetings). Working within a supervised Student Peer Group, you will also have the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. This module complements the 'Dissertation Report: Geography' module, which is a co-requisite.

  • GEG344 Glaciology

    This module will provide you with the scientific basis to understand the physical behaviour of glacier ice at spatial scales ranging from individual ice crystals to continental-scale glaciation. The module core topics will include glacier mass balance, transformation of snow to ice, glacier hydrology, dynamics, ice crystal structure and deformation, glacier sliding, deformation of glacial sediments, glacier flow instabilities and glacier surging. We will then introduce example topics of current research interest. You will have the opportunity to work in a small group on a guided research project. The module is assessed through an individual paper critique and ¿take-home¿ examination, as well as group presentation of your research project results at a poster-based mini-conference, and as a report. The research project work will normally be assigned a group mark, however, individual student¿s marks may be moderated based on self and peer assessment.

  • GEGM06B Geographic Information and Climate Change

    This module provides the opportunity to undertake a substantial individual research project in Geographic Information and Climate Change. Support will be provided by a staff supervisor and through student-led discussions. There will also be the opportunity to provide constructive criticism to fellow students undertaking related research projects, learning from their research problems and subsequent solutions. Interim results will be presented orally (July and August). The final results of the research dissertation will be presented in the form of a scientific paper in the format of a leading international journal in the research area and a one-page summary (not assessed) at a suitable level for an intelligent lay person. In addition to submission of the written document, students are required to make a formal presentation on their research findings during the last week of the period of candidature which is assessed and contributes towards the final grade.

  • GEGM07 Principles of Environmental Dynamics

    This module aims to explain and understand past, present and potential future changes in the Earth's climate and environment. It provides a broad approach to environmental processes and dynamics operating on land, in the oceans and in the atmosphere on a global and regional scale. Emphasis is placed on the evidence available for reconstructing past environmental dynamics, the implications for present-day processes, future predictions and likely impacts.

  • GEL200 Introductory Geology for Engineers

    This module is an introduction to geology aimed particularly at the needs of civil engineers. The module comprises three sections, covering geological materials - minerals and rocks; distribution of rocks through geological maps and their interpretation; and engineering geology. Lectures are supported by practical work. The module assumes no prior knowledge of geology.

External Responsibilities

  • Book Review Editor:, The Holocene (Sage)

    0 - Present

  • Editorial Board member, Proceedings of the Geologists Association (Elsevier)

    0 - Present

Career History

Start Date End Date Position Held Location
2012 Present Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography Swansea University
2004 2012 Lecturer in Physical Geography Swansea University
2002 2004 Marie Curie Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Glasgow

Research Groups

  • Glaciology Group

    A research group dedicated to furthering knowledge in the quantification of the past and future contribution from glaciers and ice sheets to sea-level rise; the processes driving the present rapid and dramatic changes observed in glaciers, and the instabilities inherent in glacial systems; and the record of palaeo-ice mass instabilities and the processes that drove these changes.

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Deputy Chair of the Academic Regulations and Cases Board - Geography

    2016 - 2018

  • MSc Programme Coordinator - Geographic Information and Climate Change, Geography

    2011 - Present