Professor John Tucker
Professor
Computer Science
Telephone: (01792) 295649
Email: JavaScript is required to view this email address.
Room: Office - 309
Third Floor
Faraday Building (Tower Block)
Singleton Campus

Areas of Expertise

  • Theory of data and data types
  • Algebraic methods for modelling and specification
  • Computability theory
  • Physical foundations for computation
  • History of computing
  • History of science in Wales
  • Socio-technical aspects of web
  • Identity, monitoring and surveillance

Publications

  1. & Classifying the computational power of stochastic physical oracles. International Journal of Unconventional Computing
  2. Richard Price and the History of Science. Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion 23, 69-86.
  3. & Surveillance and identity: conceptual framework and formal models. Journal of Cybersecurity 3(3), 145-158.
  4. & (2017). Theorising Monitoring: Algebraic Models of Web Monitoring in Organisations. Presented at Lecture Notes in Computer Science,, 13-35. Berlin: Springer Verlag. doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-72044-9_3
  5. & Phatic systems in digital society. Technology in Society 46, 140-148.

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Teaching

  • CSC309 Invention and Innovation in Computing

    The course will introduce the student to the history of contemporary computing. Among themes to be explored are the role of invention and innovation, and their commercialisation; and the impact of computing developments on society. The course will offer the opportunity for the student to investigate computing innovations and their historical development, or to work practically on items in the University┬┐s History of Computing Collection.

  • CSC409 Invention and Innovation in Computing

    The course will introduce the student to the history of contemporary computing. Among themes to be explored are the role of invention and innovation, and their commercialisation; and the impact of computing developments on society. The course will offer the opportunity for the student to investigate computing innovations and their historical development, or to work practically on items in the University┬┐s History of Computing Collection.