Publications

  1. & Flower resource and land management drives hoverfly communities and bee abundance in seminatural and agricultural grasslands. Ecology and Evolution 7(19), 8073-8086.

Teaching

  • BIO103 Plants and Algae; Diversity Form and Function

    Plant lectures cover the structure, life cycles and morphology of the major living Divisions of the Plant Kingdom. Floral structure, pollination, fruit dispersal and seed germination are discussed with particular reference to plant-animal interactions. This is followed by lectures that cover the basic anatomy of higher plants, from the cellular to the whole organism level. Lectures on plant physiology will emphasise flowering plants as whole organisms and concentrate particularly on plant-environment interactions. The topics covered are: photosynthesis; water relations; mineral nutrition; organic translocation; growth; developmental physiology. Aspects of plant ecology, plant-herbivore interactions and the importance of plants in medicine will also be covered. The lectures on plants are complemented by three laboratory practical sessions; Lower plant classification is studied by development of a dichotomous key; Basic anatomy and cell structure are studied microscopically; Physiological experiments illustrate aspects of plant water relations. Additionally, taxonomy and classification of species from the major divisions are studied by demonstrations displaying a wide range of specimens, along with examples of flower structure, pollination types and seed/fruit dispersal. Lectures on microalgae, cyanobacteria and macroalgae will provide an overview on the importance of these photosynthetic organisms in aquatic ecology and in evolution, and in how they can be used to help society. Phenotypic and genotypic taxonomic classification will be introduced followed by morphology and ecology of the main taxonomic classes. An overview of algal measurement techniques will be given. Roles of microalgae within microbial food webs and global biogeochemical cycles including introduction to harmful blooms will be included. This will lead onto how algae are increasingly important in biotechnology and how they can be used to help provide solutions to societal sustainability issues such as climate change, global food security, pollution and developing the bioeconomy. There will be one laboratory practical associated with these lectures, illustrating the diversity of micro and macroalgae and developing microscope techniques.

  • BIO232 Plant Ecology

    This module provides a holistic approach to plant ecology, including both classical ecological theory and practical surveying techniques. Students will become familiar with six major themes; plant formations and biomes, synecology, autecology, plant geography, paleoecology and modern plant ecology. Students will also be trained in plant taxonomy, field surveying techniques, data analysis and report writing that complement a future career in ecology, conservation or consultancy

  • BIO249 Introduction to field ecology

    This residential field course comprises practical work employing techniques appropriate to sample biodiversity and environmental parameters from a range of terrestrial and freshwater habitats (woodlands, grasslands, freshwater systems). Students will learn techniques for the identification of species, practice recording accurate field notes, and gain experience in the analysis and presentation of ecological data. Furthermore students will be able to recognise different temperate habitats and the indicator species associated with them.

  • BIO251 Biosciences Year 2 field course alternative assessment

    This module is an alternative for students that are unable to attend the residential Biology, Zoology or Marine Biology field courses in Year 2. In order to qualify for this module, students need to have a satisfactory reason that has been authorided by the module coordinators before the field course is undertaken. Evidence of this will be required. Students will be supplied with data to analyse and directed to research and investigate relevant habitats that emulate those studied on the field course.

  • BIO327 Tropical marine ecology field course

    This field based module will provide students with an introduction to the ecology of tropical marine systems and teach students the key practical skills required by tropical marine biologists. Students will obtain training in how to design, implement and report scientifically robust marine research. The module will complement the level three marine field course and help develop key skills in field based marine biology. Students will learn skills in marine ecology and taxonomy, in-water marine sampling and surveys, and impact assessment. This module will be mostly practical based but will also include theory lectures, workshops and feedback sessions. It would be structured around seven days of directed practical activities and a three day small group based mini-project. The field course will utilise snorkeling and intertidal walking as the major means of sampling throughout directed practical¿s.

  • BIO331 Professional Techniques in Ecology, conservation and Resource Management

    This field based module will introduce students to the professional techniques utilised to monitor and study animals and plants in a variety of terrestrial habitat types and in relation to conservation management and biodiversity monitoring in the United Kingdom. The course places a strong emphasis on ecological census techniques and basic classification and taxonomy. Students will develop key techniques relevant to the environmental sector including Protected Species (specifically birds, amphibians, mammals, reptiles and plants), River and Phase 1 habitat surveys and Environmental Impact Assessment. Students will also learn about the biotic and abiotic factors that define different UK habitats and be introduced to the natural history of Wales. A focus is on developing key transferable skills that enhance employability such as problem solving, data analysis, report writing, evaluation, communication and teamwork.This module is therefore suitable for students wishing to pursue a career in ecological consultancy or conservation.

  • BIOM32 Ecosystems: Ecology, Conservation & Resource Management

    In this module, the students will learn to identify and understand the diversity and contrasting characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on the origin and effects of various human-induced environmental impacts.

Supervision

  • Semi-natural grassland habitats as a source of pollinating insects to the wider countryside. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Daniel Forman
    Other supervisor: Dr Geoff Proffitt