Areas of Expertise

  • Movement ecology
  • Population ecology
  • Community ecology
  • statistics
  • spatial ecology
  • Agroecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Applied ecology
  • roe deer
  • animal movements
  • habitat use
  • home range
  • biodiversity

Publications

  1. & Impact of changing wind conditions on foraging and incubation success in male and female wandering albatrosses. Journal of Animal Ecology
  2. & Dynamic Range Size Analysis of Territorial Animals: An Optimality Approach. The American Naturalist 188(4), 460-474.
  3. & Local biodiversity is higher inside than outside terrestrial protected areas worldwide. Nature Communications 7, 12306
  4. & Trait-matching and mass effect determine the functional response of herbivore communities to land-use intensification. Functional Ecology
  5. & Fathers matter: male body mass affects life-history traits in a size-dimorphic seabird. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 284(1854), 20170397

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Teaching

  • BIB700 Trends in Biosciences

    In this module you will discover what it takes to be a research scientist and discuss world-leading research with biologists from Universities and research institutes from all over the UK and further afield. You will attend our Biosciences seminar series, generally held every second Thursday, as well as a series of journal clubs and more informal talks, held on the Thursdays in between the biweekly seminars. Following each seminar there will be a group workshop with the speakers where you will to learn to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline, and gain a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in Biosciences. For a selection of seminars, you will summarise the research highlights (3 to 5 bullet points, maximum 85 characters) and write an abstract on the research (max 300 words). You will also produce brief, webinar-style presentations and blogs for Swansea BioTalks, the blog for our seminar and journal club series at the Department of Biosciences. These tasks will allow you to fine-tune your communication skills and increase your depth of understanding of the latest research in Biosciences.

  • BIO252 Ecological Data Analysis

    This module introduces students to the basics of analyzing ecological data, using the R Software Environment for Statistical Computing. The topics covered will be also broad enough to be equally applicable to basic data analysis across biology. Students will receive 7 computer-based workshops/practicals, complemented by 7 lectures before each workshop. Furthermore, a weekly drop-in stats help session will be provided, as well as help through a course Facebook page. The module will cover 5 key themes: 1). Data analysis and statistics, reproducibility and the R Software Environment; 2). Data management; 3). Data visualization; 4). Data analysis - The general linear model; 5). Data analysis - Presentation of results and outline of more advanced methods. The module will be subject to continuous assessment consisting of 6 pieces of computer-based work (70% of final mark), which will require the students to carefully complete all course work assigned on a weekly basis ('independent learning'), in order to be able to complete the assignments. A further 30% of the final mark will consist in a data analysis report, to be completed after the end of the course. Weekly readings and non-assessed computer-based exercises will be assigned, too.

  • BIO308 Movement ecology

    This module will examine why, how, where and when organisms move. The lectures will draw on first principles of animal movement in order to examine the costs and benefits of different movement strategies and how they apply to animals from aphids to eagles. While the module will refer to movement in a wide variety of animals, many core elements of behavioural ecology have been developed using birds as model organisms. Consequently, several key module themes are explored using birds as examples. Movement will be examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales, as recorded using some of the very latest technologies.

Supervision

  • Movement energetics of giant tortoises on Round Island, Mauritius (current)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Prof Rory Wilson
  • Prey capture, movement energetics and climate change responses in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) (current)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Prof Rory Wilson
  • 'The role of PCBs on parasitism in harbour porpoise using UK strandings data' (current)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Dr James Bull
  • 'Can vulture distributions be predicted according to their body size, and the environmental parameters they currently operate in?' (current)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Dr Emily Shepard
  • Advanced Telemetry and Bio-logging for Investigating Grey Seal Interactions with Marine Renewable Energy (MRE) Installations. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr James Bull
  • Testing metapopulation dynamics in grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, using photo ID data (current)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Dr James Bull
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Rowan Brown
  • Life in the slow lane: The sloth niche, divine or dangerous; a case study in Costa Rica. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Rory Wilson
    Other supervisor: Dr Emily Shepard
  • Individual variability in dispersal and invasion speed (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Elaine Crooks
  • Linking plant demography, ecological dynamics and population genetics across space and time. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr James Bull
  • 'Ecological proxies in a half shell: What dictates the movement of ecological analogue, Aldabra Tortoise (Aldabrachelys gigantea) on Round Island, Mauritius' (awarded 2017)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Prof Rory Wilson
  • 'Dynamic ungulates and the use of accelerometry to define movement patterns' (awarded 2017)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Prof Rory Wilson