Martin gained his PhD at Edinburgh Napier University in 2009, in Nanoparticle In Vitro Toxicology, and spent the next 7.5 years in Switzerland conducting his post-doctoral research career before joining Swansea University Medical School in Dec 2015. Since post-graduate study, Martin has remained in the discipline of Nanotoxicology. He is motivated and enthusiastic, with core competence in nanotoxicology (particle and fibre toxicology). Martin’s research is focused on the nanoparticle-(mammalian)cell interaction, with a view to determining the mechanistic toxicological, immunological and genotoxic effects that nanoparticles, with varying physico-chemcial characteristics, may cause at the cellular level by using advanced, next-level in vitro systems combined with state-of-the-art microscopy and bioanalytical approaches. Special interests include the ability for nanoparticle shape (e.g. spheres, stars, fibres, whiskers) and surface properties (e.g. charge, protein interactions, peptides) to interfere with the human immune system and bloodstream. Another clear ambition of Martin's research is to create, study and promote alternative in vitro models that mimic in vivo environments to gain a mechanistic understanding of how nano-sized materials may, potentially, be adverse to human health. Special focus is also given to creating disease-based in vitro models and the role nanoparticles play in disease progression/exacerbation. He has a keen interest in biotechnology and bionanomaterials, with an eye to manipulate the many novel nanomaterial properties to create sophisticated bionano applications. Martin is Associate Editor for the Journal of Nanobiotechnology and Editorial board member for both Particle and Fibre Toxicology, and Food and Chemical Toxicology. Martin is a Fellow of the European Respiratory Society, Member of the Royal Society of Biology and the UK Environmental Mutagenesis Society and Committee Member of the UK In Vitro Toxicology Society.

Areas of Expertise

  • Nanotoxicology
  • In Vitro Toxicology
  • Multi-cellular In Vitro Systems
  • Immunology
  • Nanoparticle-Cell Interactions
  • Microscopy
  • Air Pollution
  • Human Health Hazard Assessment
  • Lung
  • Air-Liquid Exposure Systems
  • Nanoscience
  • (Nano)Fibres

Publications

  1. & Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of hollow TiO2-coated CeO2nanocontainers encapsulating silver nanoparticles for controlled silver release. J. Mater. Chem. B 4(6), 1166-1174.
  2. & Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model. Particle and Fibre Toxicology 13(1)
  3. & Decoupling the shape parameter to assess gold nanorod uptake by mammalian cells. Nanoscale 8(36), 16416-16426.
  4. & An overview of nanoparticle biocompatibility for their use in Nanomedicine. In Cornier, Jean / Owen, Andrew / Kwade, Arno / Van de Voorde, Marcel (Ed.), Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology. (pp. 443-468). Wiley.
  5. & (2016). Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the respiratory toxicity of volcanic ash in vitro. Presented at Presented at EGU General Assembly/Geophysical Research Abstracts,, EGU2016-7855-1EGU General Assembly/Geophysical Research Abstracts.

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Teaching

  • PM-120 Genetic Analysis I

    This module will give assignments designed to develop skills in essay writing and oral presentations. It will also look at the principles and practice of internet searching for scientific sources.

  • PM-M28 Nano(geno)toxicology

    Nano(geno)toxicology is a new discipline that has recently evolved with the development of the nanotechnology industry. This subject encompasses general toxicology associated with nanomaterials and also specifically focuses on the sub-discipline of genotoxicology. This course will therefore focus on, (I) the parameters of engineered nanomaterials that govern their interaction and influence on biological systems; (II) techniques that are central elements in assessing the safety evaluation of nanomaterials; (III) portals of entry into the body, their potential fate and the mechanisms that underlie cellular damage by nanomaterials.

  • PMND00 Nanomedicine Research Dissertation

    This module builds on the knowledge and skills developed in teaching components in part one of their relevant programme. Students will work independently in order to critically explore and add to the evidence base for a topic of relevance to their area of study within nanomedicine.

Supervision

  • deducing the impact of engineered nanoparticles upon telomere length and function (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr Martin Clift
    Other supervisor: Prof Shareen Doak
  • Mechanistic evaluation of the impact of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with drugs (SPIONd) on intracellular signalling/homeostatic mechanisms (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Shareen Doak
    Other supervisor: Dr Martin Clift
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Shareen Doak
    Other supervisor: Dr Martin Clift
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Mr Thierry Maffeis
    Other supervisor: Dr Martin Clift
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Martin Clift
    Other supervisor: Prof Shareen Doak