Lecturer in Applied Medical Sciences and Medical Pharmacology
Swansea University Medical School
Telephone: (01792) 295056

Kate was awarded her BSc in Biochemistry from the University of Bath in 2010, before joining the In Vitro Toxicology Group at Swansea University in the same year to commence her PhD studies. Funded by the National Centre for the 3Rs (NC3Rs) and supervised by Professor Gareth Jenkins, Kate’s PhD centred on the improvement of existing in vitro genotoxicity tests. This involved the development of chronic dosing regimens and 3D tissue culture models.

Following the completion of her PhD laboratory work in 2014, Kate remained within the In Vitro Toxicology Group as a Postdoctoral Researcher, developing a novel in vitro carcinogenicity tool as a potential replacement for the two-year rodent bioassay. From her research activity, Kate has developed a keen interest in animal replacement science, specifically the potential of novel in vitro alternatives in furthering medical research.

Kate is currently a Lecturer in Applied Medical Sciences and Medical Pharmacology at Swansea University Medical School, commencing this role in 2018. Kate is Deputy Examinations Officer and leads several modules. Kate also contributes to teaching on other degree courses within the Medical School, such as the BSc Genetics and Biochemistry programmes and MSc Genomic Medicine and Nanomedicine programmes. Kate collaborates with and provides training to scientists at other institutions, most notably at the Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research.4

Kate has been awarded several national and international prizes during her career to date, including the international Lush Young Researcher Prize (2016), as well as the Welsh Livery Guild Travel Scholarship and Best New Investigator Platform Presentation at the USA EEMGS Meeting (2014). Kate has also been the recipient of several small grants, including those awarded by the UK Environmental Mutagen Society and the NC3Rs.

Publications

  1. & Reprint of: A three-dimensional in vitro HepG2 cells liver spheroid model for genotoxicity studies. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 834, 35-41.
  2. & A three-dimensional in vitro HepG2 cells liver spheroid model for genotoxicity studies. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 825, 51-58.
  3. & Investigation of J-shaped dose-responses induced by exposure to the alkylating agent N -methyl- N -nitrosourea. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 819, 38-46.
  4. & A novel, integrated in vitro carcinogenicity test to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens using human lymphoblastoid cells. Archives of Toxicology, 1-7.
  5. & Genetic toxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles using a 3D in vitro skin model (EpiDerm™). Particle and Fibre Toxicology 13(1)

See more...

Teaching

  • PM-138 Skills for Medical Sciences

    The aim of this module is to provide the student with basic skills required for laboratory research in the field of applied medical sciences. The module will be both theoretical and applied: the student will be instructed in methods essential for data acquisition and analyses but will also actively participate in the laboratory, using broadly applicable experimental techniques. They will also develop skills that are not experimental techniques themselves, but are nevertheless fundamental to the scientific process, such as `lab math,¿ sourcing information, referencing, ethics and health and safety.

  • PM-259 Contemporary themes and techniques in medical sciences

    This module aims to give students an overview of current and emerging themes in medical sciences, both from clinical and laboratory perspectives. This will cover topics generating high media interest, such as the zika virus and alternative methods of transplantation as well as new laboratory techniques. In addition, the module will be supported by two practical classes for which students will be required to conduct mini-projects based around the identification of patient samples and how these are presented as research cases. The module will also involve a one-day "conference", during which students will present data while experiencing a research conference atmosphere.

  • PM-317 Genetics of Cancer

    This module will provide students with an advanced understanding about the genetic mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis, and how these underlying processes and molecules affect the human body.

  • PM-342 Advances in Pharmacology

    Pharmacology is the science of how drugs act on the body and how the body acts on drugs. Pharmacology investigates the chemical and physical properties of drugs, how those properties confer actions on living tissues and how those actions affect health and disease. The beneficial, therapeutic effects of drugs will be discussed, but also some negative consequences of drug administration, such as toxicity, addiction and microbial drug-resistance.

  • PM-357 Biomedical Laboratory Techniques

    The module will provide practical and in depth theory of applications and equipment available to MSci students in the biomedical research laboratories based at the Medical School. The module will provide guidelines and rationale for experimental design, and data and statistical analysis.

  • PM-401 Science Communication

    This module will encompass a range of communication modes, from presentation of science to the general public to making a pitch for funding to `investors¿ The module will be run as a series of online seminars to prepare, firstly, for a short 3 minute thesis-like presentations to both a professional and non-professional audience. This will be complemented by preparation of short, New Scientist-style articles by each student on the topic of their presentation. Students will be assigned a topic that is appropriate to their degree title. For example, a Medical Geneticist could address recent advances in gene therapy. Subsequently, their task will be to produce a pitch to attract investment to commercialise their research. In the latter half of the module, the focus will be on skills-training for writing a scientific paper, preparing the ground for their project dissertations.

  • PM-M28 Nano(geno)toxicology

    dfsdf

  • PMGM14 Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening, and Treatment

    This module covers the molecular mechanisms that underlie cancer development, growth and metastasis, and the differences between different cancers. It will explore the different molecular and cellular actions of anti-cancer treatments, the genomic factors affecting response and resistance to treatment, and the research approaches to anti-cancer drug design and development. Broad situations which confer a high cancer risk to a person and/or to other members of the same family will be discussed in the context of how genomic information may be integrated into cancer screening programmes. This module will prepare the students to interrogate the cancer data sets from the 100,000 Genomes Project as well as to interrogate cancer genomic datasets in general.