Publications

  1. ‘Identification from CCTV: the Risk of Injustice’. Criminal Law Review 2007, 591 – 608
  2. Protection of Journalists’ Sources’. Public Law 2007, 464 – 487
  3. Determining “functions of a public nature” under the Human Rights Act 1998: A New Approach’. European Public Law 2007

Teaching

  • LAA224 Human Rights Law

    This module is focused on freedom of expression. We explore different aspects of this right, to provide students with wide-ranging and in-depth knowledge of relevant law and issues. Areas considered include protection of journalists¿ sources, public order law, and racist speech.

  • LAA321 Criminal Evidence

    This module considers the law relating to witnesses. It examines witness competence and compellability, in relation to children and adults. It then addresses the trial stages: the rules governing the questioning of witnesses in examination-in-chief and cross-examination. Lastly, issues around expert witness evidence are explored. Students should be aware that most areas of the syllabus involve examination of cases concerning sexual offences against adults and children.

  • LAA321A Criminal Evidence

    This module considers the law relating to witnesses. It examines witness competence and compellability, in relation to children and adults. It then addresses the trial stages: the rules governing the questioning of witnesses in examination-in-chief and cross-examination. Lastly, issues around expert witness evidence are explored. Students should be aware that most areas of the syllabus involve examination of cases concerning sexual offences against adults and children.

  • LAA323 Criminal Evidence Law and Psychology

    The emphasis in this module is on the law of criminal evidence. Psychology research will be used to test the assumptions underlying rules and principles of criminal evidence law. The areas of law considered relate primarily to the defendant: identification evidence, bad character, silence during police questioning, and confession evidence.

  • LAA323A Criminal Evidence Law and Psychology

    The emphasis in this module is on the law of criminal evidence. Psychology research will be used to test the assumptions underlying rules and principles of criminal evidence law. The areas of law considered relate primarily to the defendant: identification evidence, bad character, silence during police questioning, and confession evidence.