Richard began his career as a trainee, later assistant, solicitor with the British Coal Corporation. Following that he went to the Cayman Islands Law School and was a member of the Chambers of the Attorney General of the Cayman Islands. 

Returning to the United Kingdom he has held posts at Swansea Institute of Higher Education and the University of South Wales latterly as Director of the Legal and Financial Advice Clinic before taking up the post as Clinic Director at the University of Essex in 2014.  He joined Swansea University as Director of the Swansea Law Clinic in January 2017.  

A former Chair of the Association of Law Teachers, Richard was also formerly a member of the Law Commission’s Wales Advisory Committee. He has also been the UK Centre for Legal Education’s Consultant in Wales, a visiting professor to Fudan University, People’s Republic of China under the EU-China Co-operation Programme, an Independent Reviewer for the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives, and a reviewer for the Quality Assurance Agency.  Currently, Richard is a member of the Law Society's Wales and Access to Justice Committees.   

Until recently Richard was the editor of the Policy and Educational Developments section of The Law Teacher: The International Journal of Legal Education, and remains on their Editorial Board.  He is also a reviewer for the International Journal of Clinical Legal Education. He has convened a number of conferences on legal education in Wales most recently for the Legal Education Research Network (LERN) in April 2016.  In addition, to running clinics providing initial advice and assistance to members of the public in areas such as housing, relationship breakdown, consumer issues, and employment law, Richard has also run a prison law project in association with the Prisoners' Advice Service, and a Miscarriage of Justice Project in association with Inside Justice and the Centre for Criminal Appeals.     

Further information on the Law Clinic can be found here http://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/lawclinic/ 

Areas of Expertise

  • Clinical legal education
  • Legal advice services
  • Wales only law
  • Access to justice

Publications

  1. (2017). Legal Updates: Emerging Welsh Law and Procedure . (Law Society's Gazette).
  2. (2017). Access to Justice as a Human Right.
  3. (2017). Legal Education Research Network (LERN) Cymru. Swansea University: Legal Wales Conference.
  4. (2017). The Clinical Law Student and the Vulnerable Client. Presented at “Bringing It All Together: Clinical Legal Educators in the 21st Century University”, Northumbria University: The International Journal of Clinical Legal Education in association with the European Network for Clinical Legal Education and the United Kingdom Clinical Legal Education Organisation Conference.
  5. LawZone: Mapping Unmet Legal Need. International Journal of Clinical Legal Education 24(2), 3-42.

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Teaching

  • LAA364 Miscarriage of Justice Project

    Students will be involved in investigating claims of factual innocence by alleged victims of wrongful convictions as part of a Miscarriage of Justice Project. Students work on a real life alleged miscarriage of justice case, where there is doubt about the safety of the conviction, with a view to submitting an application to the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) either for the case to be referred back to the Court of Appeal or for the CCRC to exercise its investigative powers. If the investigations show the convicted person is not factually innocent, the case will be closed. Students' work is supervised by academics in conjunction with practising solicitors, barristers, forensic scientists and others. Students work to a professional code of conduct and are expected to adhere to it. There is a lot of workshop activity so regular attendance is essential. Before students can start on the Module they will have to have signed a confidentiality and consent agreement.

  • LAA365 Miscarriage of Justice Project

    Students will be involved in investigating claims of factual innocence by alleged victims of wrongful convictions as part of a Miscarriage of Justice Project. Students work on a real life alleged miscarriage of justice case, where there is doubt about the safety of the conviction, with a view to submitting an application to the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) either for the case to be referred back to the Court of Appeal or for the CCRC to exercise its investigative powers. If the investigations show the convicted person is not factually innocent, the case will be closed. Students' work is supervised by academics in conjunction with practising solicitors, barristers, forensic scientists and others. Students work to a professional code of conduct and are expected to adhere to it. There is a lot of workshop activity so regular attendance is essential. Before students can start on the Module they will have to have signed a confidentiality and consent agreement.

  • LAA366 Clinical Legal Education

    The module examines, in a clinical setting, a number of issues surrounding the provision of legal advice and involves the student training as an adviser with the Swansea University¿s Law Clinic. As a result, this provides practical experience of advice work, mainly, but not exclusively, of a legal nature. The module starts with an induction into clinical advice work. The rest of the training as an adviser continues as part of the advice sessions during the module. The module looks at issues surrounding advice work such as the ethics of advice giving, the experience of giving advice, access to justice, and appropriateness of issues to raise in conversation with clients. It will also look at giving advice to different types of client including individuals, small businesses, and people with special needs including those with mental health issues. Later in the module students are also directly involved in providing advice work, and give, with appropriate supervision and support, advice over a range of areas which could include social security law, prison law, equality law, housing law, consumer law, contracts, miscarriage of justice cases and employment law. Some students, from time to time, will also assist supervisors in giving advice in immigration law and mediation. There will also be opportunities for students to be involved in community education projects of a legal nature. In order to complete this module, students are committing to train and volunteer as clinic volunteers. Therefore they are undertaking obligations to the clinic including the commitment to behave ethically according to legal professional norms and that they will provide, on average, four hours of advice per week. In addition to advising clients, students will participate in regular team meetings which will reflect on the wider societal significance of problems they have encountered, reflect critically on how the law is operating, and think of creative ways of resolving problems. Before students can advise in the Clinic they will have to have attended the training sessions on ethics and alternative sources of funding.

  • LAA367 Clinical Legal Education

    The module examines, in a clinical setting, a number of issues surrounding the provision of legal advice and involves the student training as an adviser with the Swansea University¿s Law Clinic. As a result, this provides practical experience of advice work, mainly, but not exclusively, of a legal nature. The module starts with an induction into clinical advice work. The rest of the training as an adviser continues as part of the advice sessions during the module. The module looks at issues surrounding advice work such as the ethics of advice giving, the experience of giving advice, access to justice, and appropriateness of issues to raise in conversation with clients. It will also look at giving advice to different types of client including individuals, small businesses, and people with special needs including those with mental health issues. Later in the module students are also directly involved in providing advice work, and give, with appropriate supervision and support, advice over a range of areas which could include social security law, prison law, equality law, housing law, consumer law, contracts, miscarriage of justice cases and employment law. Some students, from time to time, will also assist supervisors in giving advice in immigration law and mediation. There will also be opportunities for students to be involved in community education projects of a legal nature. In order to complete this module, students are committing to train and volunteer as clinic volunteers. Therefore they are undertaking obligations to the clinic including the commitment to behave ethically according to legal professional norms and that they will provide, on average, four hours of advice per week. In addition to advising clients, students will participate in regular team meetings which will reflect on the wider societal significance of problems they have encountered, reflect critically on how the law is operating, and think of creative ways of resolving problems. Before students can advise in the Clinic they will have to have attended the training sessions on ethics and alternative sources of funding.