Senior Lecturer
Legal Studies
Telephone: (01792) 543586
Room: Office - G06
Ground Floor
Richard Price Building
Singleton Campus

My work is currently in the field of Environmental Law, and focuses, in particular, on the enforcement of environmental offences, regulatory approaches and the role of private law in environmental protection.

Areas of Expertise

  • Environmental Law
  • Regulation
  • Regulatory approaches and enforcement
  • Law of Tort
  • Information Technology Law

Publications

  1. Cyberterrorism, Criminal Law and Punishment-based Deterrence. In Lee Jarvis, Stuart Macdonald and Thomas M. Chen (Ed.), Terrorism Online: Politics, Law and Technology. Routledge.
  2. & Public and Expert Voices in the Legal Regulation of Technology. In Roger Brownsword and Michael McGuire (Ed.), Handbook of Technology, Crime and Justice. Routledge.
  3. & (Eds.). Environmental Law and Policy in Wales: Responding to Global and Local Challenges. Patrick Bishop and Mark Stallworthy (Ed.), Cardiff: University of Wales Press.
  4. & Expressing Welsh law Perspectives on Environmental Protection. In Patrick Bishop and Mark Stallworthy (Ed.), Environmental Law and Policy in Wales: Responding to Global and Local Challenges. Cardiff: University of Wales Press.
  5. Badgers, Bovine Tuberculosis and the Role of Science in the formulation of Welsh Environmental and Agricultural Policy. In Environmental Law and Policy in Wales: Responding to Local and Global Challenges. Cardiff: University of Wales Press.

See more...

Teaching

  • LAA103 Law of Tort 1

    The Law of Tort is a branch of the civil law which provides possible remedies for the protection of a person¿s interests in relation to different forms of loss which may be experienced as a result of different types of incident. Examples of loss considered in this module include physical damage to the body or to property, injury to reputation and injury caused by the condition of premises. In deciding whether there is liability in tort, the claimant is required to demonstrate that he was owed a duty by the defendant and it may be vital to determine the degree to which one side or the other was to blame for what happened. It may matter whether the defendant caused the injury deliberately, negligently, or there may be liability even though the person who has caused the damage was not to blame at all.

  • LAA107 Law of Tort 1

    The Law of Tort is a branch of the civil law which provides possible remedies for the protection of a person¿s interests in relation to different forms of loss which may be experienced as a result of different types of incident. Examples of loss considered in this module include physical damage to the body or to property and injury caused by the condition of premises. In deciding whether there is liability in tort, the claimant is required to demonstrate that he was owed a duty by the defendant and it may be vital to determine the degree to which one side or the other was to blame for what happened. It may matter whether the defendant caused the injury deliberately, negligently, or there may be liability even though the person who has caused the damage was not to blame at all.

  • LAA227 Media Law

    Media law is essentially comprised of the legal rules and principles able to and/or designed to regulate the transmission of information in all its forms. Traditionally, this area of law has been of relevance to the media (the press, television etc) and public figures, e.g. celebrities. However, the advert of the World Wide Web and the almost ubiquitous use of user generated content via social media has endowed media law which much greater significance to all sections of society. This course will consider a number of diverse legal instruments (law of tort, criminal law, regulatory law) derived from both the common law and statute.

  • LAA327 Media Law

    Media law is essentially comprised of the legal rules and principles able to and/or designed to regulate the transmission of information in all its forms. Traditionally, this area of law has been of relevance to the media (the press, television etc) and public figures, e.g. celebrities. However, the advert of the World Wide Web and the almost ubiquitous use of user generated content via social media has endowed media law which much greater significance to all sections of society. This course will consider a number of diverse legal instruments (law of tort, criminal law, regulatory law) derived from both the common law and statute.

  • LAA328 Cybercrime

    Cybercrime is any crime that involves a computer and a network. The computer may have been used in the commission of a crime, or it may be the target. This module will enable students to develop their understanding of the criminal law within this specific context, where a growing number of criminals are exploiting the accessibility and anonymity of the internet to participate in a varied range of criminal activity. The module will broadly be divided into three parts, namely: computer integrity offences (hacking, distribution of viruses etc); content related offences (legal control of pornography); and offences where a computer and/or the internet is capable of being utilized in the commission of an offence (online fraud, copyright infringement).

  • LAQ207 Tort 1

    The Law of Tort is a branch of the civil law which provides possible remedies for the protection of a person¿s interests in relation to different forms of loss which may be experienced as a result of different types of incident. Examples of loss considered in this module include physical damage to the body or to property and injury caused by the condition of premises. In deciding whether there is liability in tort, the claimant is required to demonstrate that he was owed a duty by the defendant and it may be vital to determine the degree to which one side or the other was to blame for what happened. It may matter whether the defendant caused the injury deliberately, negligently, or there may be liability even though the person who has caused the damage was not to blame at all.

  • LAXM01 Transferred Credits

    N/A

Supervision

  • 'Online Contracting and the Supply of Digital Content to Consumers' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrew Tettenborn
    Other supervisor: Dr Patrick Bishop
    Other supervisor: Prof Elizabeth Macdonald
  • The Psychological, Behavioral and Cultural impact on IP Crime (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Mr Andrew Beale
    Other supervisor: Dr Patrick Bishop

Research Groups

  • Member

    The Centre for Environmental and Energy Law and Policy