Dr Cristina Izura
Associate Professor
Psychology
Telephone: (01792) 513344
Room: Office - 812A
Eigth Floor
Vivian Building
Singleton Campus
My research focuses on how the brain copes with the large vocabularies we own.  Do the characteristics of the words (e.g., their frequency, length, degree of concreteness) determine the way we process them? Are the words we use a reflection of our personality? How do bilingual speakers keep two vocabularies apart and interacting at the same time?
I use a mix of quantitative methods (behavioural and neuroscientific) and qualitative methods (discourse analysis and interviews). 

Publications

  1. & Data on fantasy vs contact driven internet-initiated sexual offences: Study selection, appraisal and characteristics. Data in Brief 18, 1869-1876.
  2. & A systematic review of fantasy driven vs. contact driven internet-initiated sexual offences: Discrete or overlapping typologies?. Child Abuse & Neglect 79, 434-444.
  3. & “cause ur special”: Understanding trust and complimenting behaviour in online grooming discourse. Journal of Pragmatics 112
  4. & Understanding grooming discourse in computer-mediated environments. 12, 40-50.
  5. & Sleep-dependent memory consolidation is related to perceived value of learned material. Journal of Sleep Research 26(3), 302-308.

See more...

Teaching

  • PS-M09 Theoretical Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience

    Cognitive neuroscience is the study of how the brain gives rise to mind and behaviour. Using a variety of imaging and sensing techniques, it is now possible to measure the functional activity of the brain during mental processing. Married with good experimental design, and including insights from clinical populations, this approach holds great potential for illuminating mind and behaviour. This course will begin with a brief description of cognitive neuroscience techniques and an overview of basic structural and functional brain organization. Each week, a current research issue (e.g. the nature of consciousness, the link between perception and action, the representation of objects) will be discussed in detail via the use of recent journal articles. Class participation in presenting and critiquing these papers will be expected. The module will be assessed via written assignment.

  • PS-M12 Computing Skills

    These seminars give students grounding in the skills necessary to use computer software for their research. The seminars focus on Superlab and E-Prime, which are two of the main computer programs for generating psychology experiments and collecting behavioral data via a computer. Students are taught most aspects of these programmes, including presentation of visual or auditory stimuli, the provision of feedback, and multi-block experiments. Additionally, students are taught how to employ Excel to automate the analysis. These skills are developed through workshop-style seminars, the conduct of practical tasks, and constructive peer evaluation. Students¿ skills are assessed by their application in a project comprising the writing of a computer programme to run a psychological experiment in Superlab.

  • PSY211 Cognition II: Higher Level Processes

    The module provides an in depth look at the cognitive processes underlying important higher level functions such as language, thinking, problem solving, reasoning and making decisions. The module will start covering a series of topics within perception and attention such as visual perception, biological motion, auditory perception, chemical senses, touch and proprioception, multisensory experiences, attentional mechanisms, and attention in driving. This will be followed by the most important and hotly debated issues in psycholinguistics, including how children acquire language, how language is processed in the adult mind with particular emphasis on reading, spelling dyslexia and bilingualism. The last part of the module will deal with the way in which humans make judgments, reach decisions and resolve problems and puzzles by examining the research evidence and exploring the classical and current theories.

  • PSY237 Research and Experimental Methods I

    This module is designed to further develop quantitative and qualitative methods and statistics for psychologists to prepare students for their final year independent research project. Students will be introduced to using the statistical software package SPPS for quantitative analysis and students will learn how to design mini-projects, apply appropriate statistical tests, and interpret and present data. Students will also be introduced to qualitative research methods. The module also covers research ethics, the nature of good experimental design, how to control for confounding factors and the need for replicability and reliability in scientific research.

  • PSY238 Research and Experimental Methods II

    This module is designed to further develop quantitative and qualitative methods and statistics for psychologists to prepare students for their final year independent research project and follows directly from Research and Experimental Methods I. Students will study advanced multivariate techniques and deal with complex experimental designs. Students will also explore qualitative research methods.

  • PSY319 Final Year Independent Research Project

    Students conduct an independent research project under the supervision of a member of staff. The research topic is decided in conjunction with supervisors and Research topics. Students must obtain ethical approval, design, conduct, analyse and write up a piece of research in order to achieve Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society (BPS).

  • PSY320 Dissertation

    This optional module provides students with the opportunity to conduct an extended literature review to discover what is currently known about an interesting, but less well known, area of psychology that is not taught as part of the psychology curriculum in Level 5 or 6. Students work independently, guided by their dissertation supervisor, to research a topic of their choice. In recent years students have written dissertations about `political psychology¿, `positive psychology¿ `why people take part in extreme sports¿, `does cannabis use cause schizophrenia¿ and many other diverse lines of enquiry.

  • PSY325 Independent Research Project - Joint Honours

    Students conduct an independent research project under the supervision of a member of staff. Students must obtain ethical approval, design, conduct, analyse and write up a piece of research in order to achieve Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society.

Supervision

  • 'Age of acquisition and morphological effects in word recognition and production' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeremy Tree
  • Online grooming from communicative patterns to paedophile profiles (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Jason Davies
  • Neuropsychological and neurophysiological assessment of Subjective Cognitive Complaints (SCCs) as a precursor of dementia in Welsh-English bilinguals and English monolinguals. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeremy Tree
  • A Neuropsychological Investigation of Non-clinical Anxiety and information processing speed in Ageing, Subjective And Objective Cognitive Impairment. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrea Tales
  • Information processing speed in Ageing: Is it task dependent? (awarded 2018)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Jeremy Tree
    Other supervisor: Dr Megan Crawford
    Other supervisor: Prof Andrea Tales

Research Groups

  • Language Research Centre

    Language Research Centre

  • Spanish Experimental Psychological Society (SEPEX)

    Spanish Experimental Psychological Society (SEPEX)

  • Brain and Cognition Group

    Brain and Cognition Group

Awards And Prizes

Date Description
2015 Swansea University Scholarship, Online Grooming
2014 Research Initiatives Fund, Online Grooming, From communicative modelling to paedophile profiling
2014 Swansea University Scholarship, An Investigation of the Interfacing of Dementia, Cognitive Reserve and Cognitive Decline
2012 Winner of the 'Best Paper of the Year' award by the Spanish Society for Experimental Psychology
2012 Bridging the Gaps Escalator Fund - Communicative profiling of online sex predators
2012 Bridging the Gaps Escalator Fund - A comparative exploration of the distinctive qualities of oral, hand written and language
2010 Profiling the mental lexicon