About Me

Specialist Subjects:

Thermo-mechanical fatigue
Creep lifing
Titanium alloys
Nickel Alloys
Crystallographic texture
Fatigue Lifing
Fatigue/Creep/Environment Interactions

Publications

  1. & Development and Assessment of a New Empirical Model for Predicting Full Creep Curves. Materials 8(7), 4582-4592.
  2. & The changing constants of creep: A letter on region splitting in creep lifing. Materials Science and Engineering: A 632, 96-102.
  3. & Development of true-stress creep model through analysis of constant-load creep data with application to finite element methods. Materials Science and Technology 30(15), 1899-1904.
  4. & Crack Growth of a Polycrystalline Nickel Alloy under TMF Loading. Advanced Materials Research 891-892, 1302-1307.
  5. & Relating fundamental creep mechanisms in Waspaloy to the Wilshire equations. MATEC Web of Conferences 14, 15001

See more...

Teaching

  • EG-283 Mechanical Deformation in Structural Materials

    Following on from the first year module "Mechanical Properties" this module provides further detail about the deformation characteristics of a wide range of engineering materials. The processes involved in elastic deformation, plastic deformation, fatigue and creep are examined and applied to different classes of materials including metals, ceramics and composites.

  • EG-397 Propulsion

    The course aims to provide a basic understanding of propulsion systems in order to contribute to graduating students obtaining a holistic understanding of the aerospace sector. The course includes:- - Propulsion unit requirements for subsonic and supersonic flight - Piston engine components and operation - Propeller theory - Gas turbine engines: operation, components and cycle analysis - Thermodynamics of high speed gas flow - Efficiency of components - Rocket motors: operation, components and design - Dynamics of rocket flight - Environmental issues

  • EGA306 Mechanical Deformation in Structural Materials

    Following on from the "Mechanical Properties" module this course provides further detail about the deformation characteristics of a wide range of engineering materials. The processes involved in elastic deformation, plastic deformation, fatigue and creep are examined and applied to different classes of materials including metals, ceramics and composites. Specific examples related to the medical industry are provided.

  • EGTM04 Project Planning

    Each candidate will prepare a detailed project plan covering background to the research, the scheduling of practical and other work, and milestone deliverables. This plan will be produced following: (i) attendance at specialist lectures covering issues of good practice in the conduct of research eg safety, procedures for laboratory work and data reporting/analysis; (ii) discussion with academic and industrial supervisors regarding technical/commercial issues associated with the specific topic; (iii) a review of the formal course units covering technical issues, personal and professional development and research skills. The overall report must demonstrate that each student relates relevant aspects of the training courses to their industry oriented research project. Not available to visiting or exchange students.

  • EGTM64 Design Against Creep Failure

    The module defines low and high temperature creep in metallic and ceramic based materials. Deformation mechanisms and bulk measurements are described as a basis for predictions of mechanical component behaviour.

  • EGTM75 Financial Investment in Engineering

    This module, a combination of interactive seminars and computer based exercises, will provide engineering students with a detailed appreciation of financial investment for the technical environment. It will highlight the role of the individual and management during financial decision making procedures and associated risk assessment. Case studies of large scale investments in the aerospace industry will be employed throughout the course.

  • EGTM93 Holistic Gas Turbines and Materials Selection

    The module aims to give a complete understanding of the main aspects of gas turbine design. It is “holistic” in its emphasis on the links between performance aerodynamics, mechanics and the associated materials selection. These design criteria will be applied to the case study of a simple turbofan or intercooled/recuperated marine/industrial engine, using only hand calculations on paper (i.e. without the aid of a computer) and working in small teams.

Supervision

  • Interactions of stress and oxidation in Ni-based alloys (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache
  • MA by DLD - Mechanical property evaluation (IN718) (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache
  • An investigation into the thermal mechanical fatigue behaviour of TiMMCs (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • Constitutive behaviour in turbine disc alloys (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Dr Helen Davies
  • Thermo-mechanical fatigue crack propagation behaviour in titanium alloys (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Geraint Williams
  • 'Application of the wilshire equations to nickel disc alloys with an investigation of the dislocation network' (current)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Steve Brown
  • The thermal degradation of 300 series austenitic stainless steel welds (current)

    Student name:
    MSc
    Other supervisor: Dr David Penney
  • 'Constitutive relationships and the prediction of notched specimen behaviour under TMF loading RR1000' (awarded 2016)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • 'The effects of loading proportionality on fatigue life ' (awarded 2016)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • The effects of prior inelastic strain on fatigue lives and crack growth rates (awarded 2016)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • 'Influence of new joining techniques on the fatigue performance of novel chassis & suspension designs' (awarded 2016)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • 'Thermo-mechanical fatigue crack growth of a polycrystalline nickel aklloy' (awarded 2015)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Steve Brown
  • ''Titanium Alloy Developments for "Vision 10" Dan Disc Applications` (awarded 2015)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Dr Karen Perkins
  • 'Lifing Methods Against Rotor Overspeed Failure for Gas Turbine Applications' (awarded 2015)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Steve Brown
  • 'Fatigue Characterisation of Novell Titanium alloys future aero engine components' (awarded 2015)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache
  • 'Wear fatigue in nickel superalloys' (awarded 2015)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Steve Brown
  • 'Minimising variability in steel/weld fatigue data and developing robust durability design for automotive chassis applications' (awarded 2013)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • Fatigue resistant AHSS grades development (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Dr Karen Perkins
  • Applying the Wilshire Equations to Grades 22, 23 and 24 Steel (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    MRes
    Other supervisor: Professor Hamilton Mcmurray
  • Multi-axial and thermo-mechanical loading effects in nickel-based disc superalloys (awarded 2012)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache
  • Thermo-mechanical fatigue in nickel based disc alloys (awarded 2011)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache
  • Characterisation of steel cut edges for improved fatigue property data estimations and enhanced CAE durability (awarded 2011)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Professor David Worsley
  • Reliable Durability Assessment of Welded Yellow Goods Equipment. (awarded 2010)

    Student name:
    EngD
    Other supervisor: Dr David Isaac
  • Fourth Generation Single Crystal Superalloys and Advanced Lifing Methodologies (awarded 2010)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache
  • The Notch Sensitivity and Crack Propagation of Fourth Generation Single Crystal Alloys (awarded 2008)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Professor Martin Bache

Career History

Start Date End Date Position Held Location
2012 Present Senior Lecturer Materials Research Centre, Swansea University
2007 Present RCUK Fellow Materials Research Centre, Swansea University
2003 2007 Research Officer Materials Research Centre, Swansea University

Invited Presentations, Lectures and Conferences

Date Description
2004 “Texture, microstructure and mechanical properties in Ti6-4”, Ti 2003 Science & Technology 3, pp 1759-1766
2006 “Prediction of LCF initiation lives in DEN specimens based on strain control testing of plain Ti6246 specimens”
2006 “Prediction of notched specimen behaviour in textured Ti-6Al-4V”, 9th International Fatigue Congress, Atlanta
2007 “Torsion fatigue in near alpha and alpha titanium alloys”, 11th International titanium conference, Kyoto
2007 “Effect of prestrain on ambient and high temperature creep in Ti834”, 11th International titanium conference, Kyoto
2008 “Characterisation of stress concentration features in the +  titanium alloys” 11th Portuguese conference on fracture
2009 “Time Dependent Fracture of Titanium Alloys” 12th International Conference on Fracture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
2009 “Fracture mechanisms due to Fatigue, Creep and Environmental damage in titanium alloys” 12th International Conf. on Fracture
2009 “Creep fracture of centrifugally-cast HK40 tube steel”, ECCC creep conference, Zurich
2011 “Fatigue life variation due to microstructure in Ti6-4” 12th World conference on Titanium, Beijing
2012 “The Wilshire Equations for Long-Term Creep Life Prediction”, Creep 2012
2012 “High Temperature Creep Behaviour of Gamma Titanium Aluminides (-TiAl)” Creep 2012

External Responsibilities

  • Board Member, Institute of Materials Structure and Properties of Materials

    2011 - Present

  • External Examiner at PhD and MRes Levels, The University of Birmingham

    2012 - Present

Awards And Prizes

Date Description
2007 Awarded Chartered Physicist Status
2007 Awarded RCUK Research Fellowship

Research

Thermo-mechanical fatigue

Within the gas turbine engine, the high transient thermal stresses resulting from throttle movement from idle to high settings give rise to the phenomenon of thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). These effects have been widely explored for turbine blade materials, typically single crystal nickel alloys. More recently however, a combination of thinner disc rims and further increases in turbine entry temperature has lead to a situation where TMF in disc materials cannot be ignored. Turbine discs will usually be manufactured from polycrystalline nickel alloys, and as such it is now considered critical that TMF effects in this system of alloys is fully characterised. Research within the Institute of Structural Materials in collaboration with Roll-Royce plc leads the way in the development of modelling approaches to TMF through a range of cutting edge experimental techniques.

Modern creep lifing approaches

Traditional creep lifing techniques based on power law equations have shown themselves to be extremely limited, particularly in the prediction of long term data based only on short term experimental data. More recently, alternative approaches such as the Wilshire equations and hyperbolic tangent methods have been proposed which offer a new insight into the field. Ongoing research within the Institute of Structural Materials focuses on the development of the Wilshire equations in particular, their relationship with microscopic behaviour of engineering alloys and their application to a range of materials that currently includes copper, aluminium alloys, steels, titanium alloys, nickel superalloys and titanium aluminides.

Titanium alloys

Premature failure of titanium based engineering components in the 1970s brought to attention the phenomenon of dwell effects at low temperatures in these alloys, loosely termed ‘cold creep’, which are currently still a major concern for designers. Ongoing research at the Institute of Structural Materials seeks to address the issue through targeted mechanical testing and microscopic evaluation. The presence, extent and effect on mechanical properties of cold dwell related features such as ‘quasi-cleavage’ facets are investigated with the resultant effect on both creep and fatigue life also studied.

Measures of Esteem

  • Invited contribution to book (single author) – Gas Turbines (ISBN 978-953-307-324-8.) – Chapter title – Titanium in the Gas Turbine engine.
  • Invited speaker – Power plant cycling conference, North Carolina, 2012
  • Co-author of invited papers (Fatigue 2007, Grain Boundaries at High Temperatures 2009)
  • Act as an international consultant on titanium alloys and creep lifing
  • Reviewer for 5 major international journals - International Journal of Fatigue, Journal of Materials Science, Metallurgical & Materials Transactions A, Fatigue & Fracture of Engineering Materials & Structures