Professor Andrew Rothwell
Professor of French and Translation Studies
Modern Languages
Telephone: (01792) 295967

Andrew Rothwell is Professor of French, subject-leader for Translation Studies and chair of the Translation and Multilingualism (TRAM) research group. He also coordinates the School's MA in Translation with Language Technology and PhD Translation programmes and is co-chair (with Dr John Goodby, English) of the Modernisms research group. After a BA in French and German at St John's College, Oxford, he stayed on to begin a DPhil on the French Modernist poet Pierre Reverdy, before taking up a one-year post as lecteur at the Ecole Normale Supérieure (rue d'Ulm) in Paris. A Laming Travelling Fellowship at the Queen's College, Oxford then took him back to Paris, followed by lectureships in French at the Universities of Exeter and Leeds. He was appointed to a chair in Swansea in 1999.

Publications

  1. & Translation Studies and Translation Practice: Proceedings of the 2nd International TRANSLATA Conference, 2014. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.
  2. Noël, Nonoléon, Jabès: Anagrams and Palindromes of the Papoète. The Modern Language Review 112(1), 121
  3. (2016). Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) Tools as an Aid to Translation Creativity: the Case of Zola’s La Joie de vivre. Presented at Creativity in Translation/Interpetation and Interpreter/Translator Training,, 113-116. Rome: Aracne.
  4. 'qui es-tu sous la ressemblance qui va là sous couvert de moi’ – the hourglass of poetic identity in Bernard Noël’s L’Ombre du double. Modern Language Review 110(1), 121-148.
  5. 'et ma logique va en rond': Bernard Noël's Hourglass Figure. The Modern Language Review 108(1), 109-128.

See more...

Teaching

  • EGIM10F Communications skills in a foreign language - French

    In this module, students will be exposed to basic communication skills in French. This module is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of the chosen foreign language. The aim of the module is two-fold: - To enable students to acquire a basic vocabulary and an understanding of fundamental grammatical structures so as to allow them to communicate in a written and spoken manner. Students will also acquire awareness of contemporary foreign culture from the range of materials used. - In addition, students will develop basic technical communication skills within the field of computational mechanics from the range of materials used, such as technical papers, chapters of books or recorded lectures/presentations in the chosen foreign language.

  • EGIM10G Communications skills in a foreign language - German

    In this module, students will be exposed to basic communication skills in German. This module is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of the chosen foreign language. The aim of the module is two-fold: - To enable students to acquire a basic vocabulary and an understanding of fundamental grammatical structures so as to allow them to communicate in a written and spoken manner. Students will also acquire awareness of contemporary foreign culture from the range of materials used. - In addition, students will develop basic technical communication skills within the field of computational mechanics from the range of materials used, such as technical papers, chapters of books or recorded lectures/presentations in the chosen foreign language.

  • MLF160B French Language 1B

    This module is the foundation of advanced level study of French which will equip students with the skills needed to use French in day-to-day life and professional environments. The module aims to consolidate and extend the language skills developed by students at A level (or equivalent) and to facilitate their progress in linguistic competence. It concentrates on further developing fluency and accuracy in written and spoken French, establishing a firm grammatical understanding of the language, and extending students¿ vocabulary to read, write, interpret and speak about issues related to contemporary French society and culture. The module aims to enhance students¿ employability by providing a grounding in the vocabulary and use of French in contexts relating to the world of work. Classes are mainly conducted in French. It is typically taken in conjunction with MLF160A. There is a Welsh-medium version of this module: MLF160BW.

  • MLF270B Intermediate French Language 2B

    This module is the foundation of advanced level study of French which will equip students with the skills needed to use French in day-to-day life and professional environments. The module aims to consolidate and extend the language skills developed by students in their beginners' language modules and to facilitate their progress in linguistic competence. It concentrates on further developing fluency and accuracy in written and spoken French, establishing a firm grammatical understanding of the language, and extending students¿ vocabulary to read, write, interpret and speak about issues related to contemporary French society and culture. The module aims to enhance students¿ employability by providing a grounding in the vocabulary and use of French in contexts relating to sustainability. Classes are mainly conducted in French. It is typically taken in conjunction with MLF270A. There is a Welsh-medium version of this module: MLF270BW.

  • MLT100 Concepts in Translation and Interpreting

    This module, compulsory for students of the BAs in Modern Languages, Translation and Interpreting, and English-Chinese Translation and Interpreting, introduces concepts central to the academic study and the professional practice of translation and interpreting. It is designed to initiate the transition from simple language-learner to well-informed language services provider which students will undergo in the course of their degree, and to act as a foundation for subsequent modules. Topics covered include: size, structure and composition of the worldwide language services market, types of translation and interpreting and their various contexts, relevant international legislation and standards, professional organisations, business interaction of suppliers with clients, fundamentals of linguistic analysis, domain research methods, and quality assurance. Assessment will be by individual Case Study (50%) and written examination (50%).

  • MLT201 Introduction to the Theory of Translation

    The question of how to evaluate a translation has occupied linguists since antiquity. In this module, some of the main issues from the rich history of this discussion will be presented. One of the oldest issues is how literal or free a translation can or should be. An example of a more modern question is: what is the right unit of translation (why not word-for-word?, what type of larger units?). We will also consider cultural and philosophical aspects of translation, and the question to what extent the translator is (and should be) visible or invisible.

  • MLT202 Computer-Assisted Translation

    Translators have long been suspicious of computers taking over their jobs. Meanwhile a variety of tools have been developed and commercialized that increase the translator's productivity without taking over control of the translation process. These Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools have a dedicated set of functions that go far beyond those of a general purpose text editor. One component of any CAT tool is a translation memory which stores old translations and retrieves portions of them when they occur in a new source text. Another component is a terminology management system which recognizes technical terms stored in a special database. In the lecture part of this module the make-up of CAT tools and their functionality is explained, as well as their influence on the work-flow of the translator using them. In the practical part, hands-on experience with a CAT tool is acquired, illustrating the points made in lectures.

  • MLT317 Translation Work Experience for BA Students

    As a student of translation, you tend to work with much precision on the solution of individual translation problems. This is of course an essential component of the work of professional translators. However, when you make the step from being a translation student to working as a professional translator, there are other factors that play a role in your day-to-day work. This module is intended to provide you with the knowledge and skills you need to make this step successfully. The first part of the module (TB1) consists of a number of lectures by industry professionals presenting translation project workflow and organization of the translation business, project management software, and job application procedures. It is concluded with an application letter and a CV for a position as translator/reviser in a translation agency. The translation agency is not entirely real, but real enough to work in practice. In TB2, you will work as a junior translator/revisor in this (fictitious) agency, managed by MA Translation students enrolled in the corresponding MA module. The work involves translating relatively short texts at a speed that reflects realistic demands. This means that you will have to observe tight deadlines while at the same time applying professional quality assurance procedures. As part of these quality assurance procedures, you will also be asked to revise translations by colleagues. Translation work will often be expected to be carried out with Computer-Assisted Translation tools. In the agency, you will have an MA student as a mentor, who can help you with any professional questions.

  • MLTM03 Translation Tools

    In 10 two-hour guided computer classes held weekly through Semester 1, this module provides hands-on training in key computerised tools and techniques required by the modern translation profession. Starting with productivity-enhancing aspects of generic office software (Word, Excel), we move on to look at online resources and data mining. The bulk of the module is devoted to hands-on use of three leading translation memory systems (e.g. SDL Trados, MemSource, Lionbridge's Translation Workspace, Google Translator Toolkit) to a professional standard. Assessment is by one group-based practical assignment in which students localize an English-language website into several languages, working in teams and each then writing an individual report. 20% of the marks are contributed by the group¿s data files, 20% by the quality of the translation and terminology produced by each language team, and 60% by the individual report.

  • MLTM05 Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

    Studying translation involves a number of special skills. They include, for instance, making optimal use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, and writing a well-structured commentary explaining your translation strategy or your use of specialized software. There are also some general skills you need, such as setting up a bibliography for a particular topic and formatting your documents to a professional standard. Apart from these skills, this module will also give you some general introductory knowledge of, for instance, the difference between terms and words and the organization of Computer-Assisted Translation tools. Finally, this module will introduce you to basic linguistic concepts and terminology, which you can use in discussing your translation work.

  • MLTM11 Translation Technologies

    This module follows on from MLTM03, expanding the range of Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools which students will be trained to handle and further developing their generic IT skills with specific reference to translation tasks. The 10 two-hour guided computer classes held weekly through Semester 2 explore a range of software packages including Deja-Vu, Star Transit, SDL Passolo and Systran. Particular emphasis is placed on the exchange of translation data between different packages. The assignment for the module is a software comparison in which students will select and evaluate a CAT tool which has not been taught as part of the module, comparing it in detail to one that has. The individual report that they write will carry 100% of the marks.

  • MLTM17 Translation Work Experience for MA Students

    The first part of this module consists of a number of lectures by industry professionals presenting translation project workflow and organization of the translation business, project management software, and job application procedures. It is concluded with an application letter and a CV for a position in a translation agency. In the second part of the module, this fictitious translation agency will be operational. The texts to be translated are selected by lecturers who act as customers. In addition, translation agencies or international partners may act as customers. Translation agencies will use archived work. For each translation, the originator of the task fills in a customer satisfaction report, a brief summary overview of the extent to which the product satisfies professional standards.

  • MLTM19 Audiovisual Adaptation

    Accessibility legislation is combining with globalisation to create an expanding professional market for audiovisual adaptation. Films and TV programmes need to be subtitled or dubbed into other languages for sale abroad, but same-language subtitling also serves the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing at home. Audio-description of the setting and action of plays and films, or of museum artefacts, enhances the enjoyment of people who are blind or visually-impaired (the BBC is now audio describing 20% of its content, including popular soaps, dramas, comedies and children's programmes). In each case, the content of a predominantly visual medium has to be transposed into words, in either the original or a different language, which are then re-presented on screen or in speech (by voiceover). This module, which will be of particular interest to MA students of Communication and Media Practice, and Translation and Interpreting Studies, provides an introduction to the history, theory and ideology of audiovisual adaptation from the silent cinema to the present day. Its main focus is on the different techniques of analysis and (re-)writing required by subtitling, dubbing and audio description, and on the use of appropriate software to perform those tasks. Assessment takes the form of a practical audiovisual adaptation project (50%) with reflective report (50%).

  • MLTM79A Report on Semester 1 Abroad

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting and who are enrolled on a study abroad module in semester 1. This module consists of a report submitted to the Swansea Programme Director on completion of the semester. The report, of between 2,000 and 2,500 words, will reflect on the academic, professional and practical experience that the student has gained abroad, concluding with a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis and a professional development plan covering the first two years after graduation.

  • MLTM79B Report on Semester 2 Abroad

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting and who are enrolled on a study abroad module in semester 2. This module consists of a report submitted to the Swansea Programme Director on completion of the semester. The report, of between 2,000 and 2,500 words, will reflect on the academic, professional and practical experience that the student has gained abroad, concluding with a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis and a professional development plan covering the first two years after graduation.

  • MLTM80 Semester Abroad - ISIT (Paris)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting.This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Institut Supérieur d'Interprétation et de Traduction (ISIT) of the Institut de Management et de Communication Interculturels in Paris, France. This partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module. This module must be taken in conjunction with either MLTM79A Report on Semester 1 Abroad or MLTM79B Report on Semester 2 Abroad.

  • MLTM81 Semester Abroad - UCO (Angers)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Institut de Perfectionnement en Langues Vivantes (IPLV) at the Université Catholique de l'Ouest (UCO) in Angers, France. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM82 Semester Abroad - Lessius (KU Leuven)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, Lessius Hogeschool in Antwerp, Belgium. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM83 Semester Abroad - LSTI (Univeristé Catholique de Louvain)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting.This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Institut Libre Marie Haps (ILMH) of the Haute École Léonard de Vinci in Brussels, Belgium. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM84 Semester Abroad - ISTI (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Institut Supérieur de Traducteurs et Interprètes (ISTI) of the Haute École de Bruxelles, Belgium. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM85 Semester Abroad - Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) in Barcelona, Spain. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM86 Semester Abroad - Università di Bologna (Forlì)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Università di Bologna (Forlì Campus), in Italy. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM87 Semester Abroad - Universität Leipzig

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting.This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Universität Leipzig, Germany. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM88 Semester Abroad - Universität Wien

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Universität Wien (Vienna), Austria. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM89 Semester Abroad - Comillas (Madrid)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting. This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Universidad Pontificia Comillas, Madrid. The partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module.

  • MLTM90 Semester Abroad - USAL (Universidad de Salamanca)

    This module is only available to students who have successfully completed Year 1 of an Extended (240 credit/120 ECTS) MA in Translation and/or Interpreting.This module, which may be taken in either semester, is made up of approved modules totalling 25 ECTS (approx.) selected from the portfolio offered by the host institution, the Universidad de Salamanca, Spain. This partner is responsible for all teaching and assessment. Module marks are returned to Swansea, converted, weighted proportionally to credit and combined into a single composite mark for this Swansea 'wrapper' module. This module must be taken in conjunction with either MLTM79A Report on Semester 1 Abroad or MLTM79B Report on Semester 2 Abroad.

Supervision

  • 'Have Meet the Fockers and The Bounty Hunter found their Arabic Glass Slipper?' (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Patricia Rodriguez-Martinez
  • An Evaluation of the Translation Programmes in the Saudi Arabian Universities. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Maria Fernandez Parra
  • Saudi EFL Learners' Attitudes toward Using Machine Translation in their EFL Study Programme: A Case Study of Qassim University. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Rocio Perez-Tattam
  • A comparative evaluation of the performance of Computer-Aided Translation (CAT) and Machine Translation (MT) tools in English-Arabic translation (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Maria Fernandez Parra