Vivienne's research interests lie primarily in the areas of second language acquisition of syntax and vocabulary and language pedagogy. She is particularly keen to empirically examine theoretically motivated research questions using large corpora of data and also to extend this to consider the implications for language teaching pedagogy.

Areas of Expertise

  • Second language acquisition
  • Syntax
  • Vocabulary
  • Link between SLA research and language pedagogy
  • Corpus Linguistics
  • Psycholinguistics

Publications

  1. & Examining the LLAMA aptitude tests. Journal of the European Second Language Association 1(1), 49-60.
  2. A brief evaluation of the LLAMA_B test. In Paul Meara & Imma Miralpeix (Ed.), Tools for researching vocabulary.. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
  3. & The Mental Lexicon. In Martha Young-Scholten, Torsten Piske, Clare Wright (Ed.), Mind Matters in Second Language Acquisition. Multilingual Matters.
  4. & Testing aptitude. EUROSLA Yearbook 16, 179-210.
  5. & Knowledge of Grammatical Use. In Milton, J.L. & Fitzpatrick, T. (Ed.), Dimensions of Vocabulary Knowledge. (pp. 106-122). Croydon: Palgrave.

See more...

Teaching

  • ALE211 Psycholinguistics

    Lectures will explain and explore the field of psycholinguistics and its concerns; the brain and biological systems; speech perception; words and meanings; sentence processing; text and discourse; first language acquisition; bilingualism; second language acquisition.

  • ALE218 Discourse Analysis

    This module introduces students to key approaches and research methodologies in the broad field of discourse analysis, including ethnography of communication, speech act theory, pragmatics, register analysis, genre analysis, and interactional sociolinguistics/conversation analysis. We will discuss these approaches, their strengths and limitations, and critically examine the application of these approaches in empirical research studies. The course features hands-on data analyses, and students will be responsible for carrying out an original discourse analysis based on original data.

  • ALE306 Second Language Acquisition

    To examine second language learning from psycholinguistic/social/cultural perspectives. To identify qualities and conditions necessary for successful SLA. To explore similarities/differences between first and second language acquisition. To build on preliminary investigations into language acquisition in ALE211 (Psycholinguistics) and ALE305 (First Language Acquisition).

  • ALE316 Language in the Media

    This module builds upon work that you have done on discourse analysis during years 1 and , applying it to a range of media texts, including television interviews, documentaries, political debates, social network sites, and participatory news sites. You will use several of the main theoretical frameworks in Discourse Analysis to do so. For example, you will draw upon the micro-analytic methods of Conversation Analysis to examine how political interviews on television and radio phone-in programmes are routinely structured: How are they opened and closed?; How are `neutral┬┐ questions posited?; and How are answers evaded? Likewise, using Im-Politeness theories, you will examine verbal conflict and aggression in online political deliberation. You will also learn about the similarities in the use of narratives across genres as diverse as documentaries, news and talkshows . The course will improve your data collection and discourse analytic skills. It will also teach you to assess critically the impact of media discourse upon contemporary society (and vice versa) and to evaluate discursive practices whereby identities are legitimised and/or challenged within the media.

  • ALE318 Research Project (Linguistics)

    In this module, students will conduct an empirical research project in Linguistics under supervision. This will entail collecting and analyzing data, as well as writing up their projects in an 8,000 word dissertation.

  • ALEM20 Second Language Acquisition

    How do you learn a second language? What processes are involved? What is the role of the first language? In this module, students will engage with these questions among others. Students will critically evaluate different theories of second language acquisition including what knowledge we have at the outset of the acquisition process and how we develop. Students will also examine different factors that may influence how successful a language learner becomes, including motivation, aptitude etc. We will read empirical studies that have sought to examine different studies and we will critically evaluate their results. The different methods of assessment will require students to critical evaluate research papers, analyse second language learner data and use this to support their arguments.

Supervision

  • A corpus driven analysis of patient information for radiography (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Cornelia Tschichold
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MA
    Other supervisor: Prof Tess Fitzpatrick
  • Untitled (current)

    Student name:
    MA
    Other supervisor: Mr Steven Morris
  • The effects of pre-teaching sub-technical vocabulary cognitively and productively on the learners' retention. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Cornelia Tschichold
  • A history of Welsh English (brief working title) (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Robert Penhallurick
  • The correlation between syntactic processing and lexical items among Arabic native speakers learning English as a second and foreign language inside Saudi Arabia and in UK. (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Cornelia Tschichold
  • The Relationship between Vocabulary Knowledge and Syntax Development in Second Language Learners (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Cornelia Tschichold
  • Investigating lower-level reading processes among L1 Arabic learners of L2 English (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Jim Milton
  • The mental lexicon: Stable construct or dynamic situated conceptualizations? (current)

    Student name:
    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Tess Fitzpatrick