Dr Tracey Rihll
Reader
Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology
Telephone: (01792) 295186

Tracey Rihll taught at Leeds and Lampeter before Swansea, where she moved in 1990. She serves on the Council of the Hellenic Society, the editorial advisory board of Vulcan: The Journal of the Social and Cultural History of Military Technology (Brill), and is co-editor of Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science (Institute for Research in Classical Philosophy and Science, Princeton). She received an Onassis Foreigner's Fellowship in 2010-2011, and a Swansea University Distinguished Teaching Award in 2012.

She has long specialized in the history of ancient science and technology, and more recently has been extending into the area of science and technology studies more generally. She also continues to work on slavery, and the social, economic and political history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.

Publications

  1. Depreciation in Vitruvius. Classical Quarterly 63(2), 893-897.
  2. Technology and Society in the Ancient Greek and Roman Worlds. Washington DC: The American Historical Association and the Society for the History of technology.
  3. & Phatic Technologies. Technology in Society 33, 44-51.
  4. Greek science. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  5. (Eds.). Science and mathematics in ancient Greek culture. C.J.Tuplin and T.E.Rihll (Ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Teaching

  • CLH268 Beyond Mainland Greece: Asia in the Classical and Hellenistic Periods.

    This module explores Asia during the Classical and Hellenistic periods, offering students the opportunity to place Greek history and culture into its wider context. At the core of the module are six regional case studies reaching across the continent, which examine local experiences across some 400 years of history. This was an age of empires (Persian and Macedonian) and we examine how foreign rule affected local culture and, in turn, how local cultures shaped these imperial powers. A number of thematic studies explore key issues across the whole continent, introducing students to comparative history whilst examining the challenges of ruling a multi-cultural empire. We also investigate the relationship between the Greek mainland and Asia, exploring how ideas were exchanged, how the Greeks described Asia, and how this Greek view has influenced our own. The course will give students the skills required to analyse an array of sources ¿ literary, archaeological, artistic ¿ focusing particularly on understanding the relationship between written evidence and material culture.

  • CLH368 Beyond Mainland Greece: Asia in the Classical and Hellenistic Periods.

    This module explores Asia during the Classical and Hellenistic periods, offering students the opportunity to place Greek history and culture into its wider context. At the core of the module are six regional case studies reaching across the continent, which examine local experiences across some 400 years of history. This was an age of empires (Persian and Macedonian) and we examine how foreign rule affected local culture and, in turn, how local cultures shaped these imperial powers. A number of thematic studies explore key issues across the whole continent, introducing students to comparative history whilst examining the challenges of ruling a multi-cultural empire. We also investigate the relationship between the Greek mainland and Asia, exploring how ideas were exchanged, how the Greeks described Asia, and how this Greek view has influenced our own. The course will give students the skills required to analyse an array of sources ¿ literary, archaeological, artistic ¿ focusing particularly on understanding the relationship between written evidence and material culture.